Places Study on Philistia

Places Study on Philistia

Psalms 60: Moab is my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe: Philistia, triumph thou because of me.
Psalms 87: I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon to them that know me: behold Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia; this man was born there.
Psalms 108: Moab is my washpot; over Edom will I cast out my shoe; over Philistia will I triumph.

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People's Dictionary of the Bible - Philistia
Philistia (fi-lís'tĭ-áh or -lĭst'yah), land of sojourners. In Psalms 60:8; Psalms 87:4; Psalms 108:9, the only places where the word "Philistia" occurs, is the same Hebrew word elsewhere translated "Palestine." Palestine originally meant only the district inhabited by Philistines. In Psalms 83:7 A. V. the word is rendered "Philistines." Josephus calls these people "Palestines." Philistia, or the "land of the Philistines," included the coast plain on the southwest of Palestine, from Joppa on the north to the valley of Gerar on the south, a distance of about 40 miles. Its breadth at the northern end was ten miles, and at the southern about 20. It appears to have extended as far inland as Beersheba. Genesis 21:33-34; Genesis 26:1; Genesis 26:14-18; Exodus 23:31; Joshua 13:2-3. At the Exodus the Philistines seem to have been such a mighty and warlike people, that the Israelites deemed it prudent to avoid their land, lest "the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt." Exodus 13:17. Thenceforward, during the whole period of Old Testament history, the Israelites and the Philistines were frequently brought in contact. The Philistines are mentioned 310 times in the Old Testament, from Genesis to Zechariah. They were a commercial as well as a warlike people. Their chief god was Dagon, Judges 16:23; 1 Samuel 5:1-5, who, as well as the goddess Derketo, had the form, of a fish.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Philistia
=Palestine (q.v.), "the land of the Philistines" (Psalm 60:8 ; 87:4 ; 108:9 ). The word is supposed to mean "the land of wanderers" or "of strangers."

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Philistia
See PALESTINA,

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Philistia, Philistines
The territory of Philistia consisted largely of the plainlands that stretched along the Mediterranean coast of Palestine. The region was known in ancient times as ‘the land of the Philistines’, from which we get the modern name ‘Palestine’. The coast road from Egypt to Palestine was known as ‘the way of the land of the Philistines’, and the Mediterranean Sea was sometimes called ‘the Sea of the Philistines’ (Exodus 13:17; Exodus 23:31).

Philistia
(fih lihss' tih uh) The coastal plain of southwestern Palestine which was under the control of the Philistines (Exodus 15:14 ; Psalm 60:8 ; Psalm 87:4 ; Psalm 108:9 ; Isaiah 14:29-31 ). KJV sometimes referred to Philistia as Palestina (Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29-31 ). See Philistines.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Philistia
See Palestine, which is the same word, and originally meant "the land of the PHILISTINES:" (See PALESTINE.) Psalms 60:8; Psalms 87:4; Psalms 108:9.) Caphtorim; Amos 9:7, "the Philistines from Caphtor"; Jeremiah 47:4; Deuteronomy 2:23. Genesis 10:14 "Casluhim, out of whom came Philistine." (See CAPHTORIM; CASLUHIM.) Both came from Mizraim, i.e. Egypt. As in Amos and Jeremiah the Philistines are traced to Caphtor, probably the Casluhim and Caphtorim were tribes which intermingled, the Caphtorim having strengthened the Casluchian colony by immigration; so the Philistines may be said to have come from either (Bochart). Philistia is derived from the Ethiopic falasa "to emigrate," Hebrew palash , "wander." (In the W. of Abyssinia are the Falashas, i.e., emigrants, probably Israelites from Palestine.) Successive emigrations of the same race took place into Philistia, first the Casluhim, then the Caphtorim from both of which came the Philistines, who seemingly were in subjection in Caphtor (the northern delta of Egypt), from whence "Jehovah brought them up" (Amos 9:7). (See CAPHTOR.)

The objection to the Mizraite origin of the Philistines from their language is answered by the supposition that the Philistine or Caphtorim invaders adopted the language of the Avim whom they conquered (Deuteronomy 2:23). Their uncircumcision was due to their having left Egypt at a date anterior to the Egyptians' adoption (Herodotus ii. 36) of circumcision (compare Jeremiah 9:25-26). The Cherethites were probably Caphtorim, the modern Copts. Keratiya in the Philistine country, at the edge of the Negeb or "south country," and now called "castle of the Fenish," i.e. Philistines, is related to the name Cherethites; so "Philistines" is related to "Pelethites." Their immigration to the neighborhood of Gerar in the south country was before Abraham's time, for he deals with them as a pastoral tribe there (Genesis 21:32; Genesis 21:84; Genesis 26:1; Genesis 26:8). This agrees with the statement (Deuteronomy 2:23) that the Avim dwelt in Hazerim, i.e. in nomadic encampments. By the time of the Exodus the Philistines had become formidable (Exodus 13:17; Exodus 15:14).

At Israel's invasion of Canaan they had advanced N. and possessed fully the seacoast plain from the river of Egypt (el Arish) to Ekron in the N. (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47), a confederacy of the five cities (originally Canaanite) Gaza (the leading one), Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (always put last). Each city had its prince (called seren or sar ; Joshua 13:3 "lords"): Amos 1:7-8. The opprobrious name given to the shepherd kings, Philition (Herodotus ii. 12) seems related to Philistine. Their plain was famed for its fertility in grain, vines, and olives (Judges 15:5), so that it was the refuge from times of famine (2 Kings 8:2; compare Genesis 26:12). It suited war chariots, while the low hills of the shephelah afforded sites for fortresses. Philistia is an undulating plain, 32 miles long, and from nine to 16 broad, from 30 to 300 ft. above the sea. To the E. lie low spurs culminating in hog's backs running N. and S., and rising in places 1,200 ft. above the sea. To the E. of these the descent is steep, about 500 ft., to valleys E. of which the hill country begins.

The sand is gaining on the land, so that one meets often a deep hollow in the sand, and a figtree or apple tree growing at the bottom, or even a house and patch of ground below the sand level. It was the commercial thoroughfare between Phoenicia and Syria on the N. and Egypt and Arabia in the S. Ashdod and Gaza were the keys of Egypt, and the latter was the depot of Arabian produce (Pint., Alex. 25). The term "Canaan" ("merchant") applied to the Philistine land (Zephaniah 2:5) proves its commercial character. They sold Israelites as slaves to Edom and Greece, for which God threatens retribution in kind, and destruction (Amos 1:6-8; Joel 3:3-8). They were skilled as smiths in Saul's days; at the beginning of his reign they had so subjugated Israel as to forbid them to have any smith. (See JONATHAN; DAVID; ISRAEL; MICHMASH.) 1 Samuel 13:19-22.

Their images, golden mice, emerods, and armour imply excellence in the arts (1 Samuel 6:11; 1 Samuel 17:5-6). They carried their idols with them in war (2 Samuel 5:21), and published their triumphs in the house of their gods; these were Dagon (Judges 16:23) , Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:9-10), Baalzebub (2 Kings 1:2-6), and Derceto (Diod. Sic. 2:4). (See DAGON.) Their god Dagon was half man and half fish; Derceto was the female deity, with the face of a woman and body of a fish; our mermaid is derived from them. They had priests and diviners (1 Samuel 6:2), "soothsayers" (Isaiah 2:6). Their wealth in money was great (Judges 16:5; Judges 16:18). They had advanced military posts or garrisons in Israel's land (1 Samuel 10:5; 1 Samuel 13:3; 1 Samuel 13:17); from whence they sent forth spoilers, so that travelers durst not go by the highways (Judges 5:6), and the Israelites hid from the Philistines in caves, or else fled beyond Jordan (1 Samuel 13:6-7).

Though the Philistine land was allotted to Israel, it was never permanently occupied (Joshua 13:2; Joshua 15:2; Joshua 15:12; Joshua 15:45-47; Judges 1:18; Judges 3:5; Judges 3:31; Judges 3:13-16). Neither Shamgar nor Samson delivered Israel permanently from the Philistines. The Israelites so lost heart that they in fear of the Philistines bound Samson (Judges 15:12). The effort to deliver the nation from the Philistines was continued unsuccessfully under Eli (1 Samuel 4), successfully under Samuel (1 Samuel 7:9-14); Saul (Israel's desire for a king was that he might lead them in war: 1 Samuel 8:20), 1 Samuel 8:1 Samuel 13; 14; 17; David (after the disaster at Gilboa: 1 Samuel 31), 2 Samuel 5:17-25, when they dared to penetrate even to the valley of Rephaim, S.W. of Jerusalem, and to Bethlehem (1 Chronicles 11:16-18; 1 Chronicles 14:8-16), taking their images, and pursuing them to Gazer, then taking Gath and so wresting the supremacy from the Philistines (1 Chronicles 18:1; 2 Samuel 8:1), so that encounters with the Philistines henceforth were in their own land (2 Samuel 21:15-22). (See METHEGAMMAH.)

Solomon had them tributary (1 Kings 4:21-24; compare 1 Kings 2:39). The Egyptian Pharaoh took Gezer at the head of the Philistia plain, and gave it as his daughter's marriage portion to Solomon (1 Kings 9:16-17); and Solomon fortified it and Bethhoron, to command the passes from the Philistia plain to the central region. At Israel's disruption Rehoboam fortified Gath, etc., against the Philistines (2 Chronicles 11:8). But the Philistines laid hold of Gibbethon commanding the defile leading from Sharon up to Samaria; Israel had a long struggle for its recovery (1 Kings 15:27; 1 Kings 16:15). The tribute had ceased, only some paid presents to Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 17:11). Under Jehoram they invaded Judah (2 Chronicles 21:16-17). Uzziah inflicted a decisive blow on them, dismantling their cities Gath, Ashdod, and Jahneh, and building commanding forts in their land (2 Chronicles 26:6; Amos 6:2).

But under the weak Ahaz the Philistines recovered, and invaded the cities of the low country and S. of Judah, taking Bethshemesh, Ajalon, Gederoth. Shocho, Timnah, and Gimzo: Isaiah 9:12, "the Syrians before (i.e. from the E., which quarter they faced in marking the points of the compass) and the Philistines behind," i.e. from the W. (2 Chronicles 28:18.) Isaiah (Isaiah 14:29-32) warns Philistia, "rejoice not because the rod of him (Uzziah) that smote thee is broken; for out of the serpent's (as the Philistines regarded Uzziah) root shall come forth a cockatrice," i.e. a more deadly adder, namely, Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:8), "and the firstborn of the poor (i.e. the most abject poor, Hebraism; the Jews heretofore exposed to Philistia's invasions and oppression) shall feed in safety." Hezekiah had Egypt for his ally in resisting Assyria, possibly also in subduing the Philistines. Hence Sargon's annals (Bunsen, Eg. 4:603) term Gaza and Ashkelon "Egyptian cities." His general Tartan took Ashdod, as key of Egypt (Isaiah 20:1-5).

The Assyrians fortified it so strongly that it stood a 29 years' siege under Psammetichus (Herodot. 2:157). Sennacherib took Ashkelon, and gave part of Hezekiah's land as a reward to Ashdod, Gaza, and Ekron for their submission (Rawlinson 1:477). After the Babylonian captivity (Ezekiel 25:15-17) the Philistines vented their "old hatred" on the Jews, for which God as He foretold "executed vengeance on them with furious rebukes, and destroyed the remnant," namely, by Psammetichus, Necho (Jeremiah 25:20), and Nebuchadnezzar who overran their cities on his way to Egypt (Jeremiah 47), and finally by Alexander the Great, as foretold (Zechariah 9:5-6, "the king shall perish from Gaza"; Alexander bound Betis the satrap to his chariot by thongs thrust through his feet, and dragged round the city; the conqueror slew 10,000, and sold the rest as slaves: Zephaniah 2:4-5). At Medinet Haboo there are sculptures representing Philistine prisoners and warriors and ships attacked by Egyptians (Rosellini). They used sometimes to burn their prisoners alive (Judges 15:6; Psalms 78:63). Their speech differed from the Jews' language (Nehemiah 13:23-24). (See PHOENICIA.)

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Philistia
PHILISTIA. See next art. and Palestine.

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Sentence search

Philistia - Philistia
Palestina - (pal uhss ti' nuh) KJV alternate name for Philistia (Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29 ,Isaiah 14:29,14:31 )
Bethe'Zel - (neighbor's house ), a place named only in ( Micah 1:11 ) From the context it was doubtless situated in the plain of Philistia
Dilean - of Ekron, in Philistia
Ether - A town of Judah noticed with Libnah, apparently near the plain of Philistia, given to Simeon, and near Rimmon
Gesh'Uri - (3:14; Joshua 12:5 ; 13:11 ) ... An ancient tribe which dwelt in the desert between Arabia and Philistia
Philistia - KJV sometimes referred to Philistia as Palestina (Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29-31 )
Dagon - (For details see BAAL; Philistia
Beth-Dagon -
A city in the low country or plain of Judah, near Philistia (Joshua 15:41 ); the modern Beit Degan, about 5 miles from Lydda
Philistia - Philistia (fi-lís'tĭ-áh or -lĭst'yah), land of sojourners. In Psalms 60:8; Psalms 87:4; Psalms 108:9, the only places where the word "Philistia" occurs, is the same Hebrew word elsewhere translated "Palestine. " Philistia, or the "land of the Philistines," included the coast plain on the southwest of Palestine, from Joppa on the north to the valley of Gerar on the south, a distance of about 40 miles
Shephelah - It served as a battleground for Israel and Philistia during the period of the judges and early monarchy
Philistine - ) A native or an inhabitant of ancient Philistia, a coast region of southern Palestine
Gath-Rim'Mon - (Joshua 21:24 ; 1 Chronicles 6:69 ) situated on the plain of Philistia, apparently not far from Joppa
Cherethim - (Ezekiel 25:16 ), more frequently Cherethites, the inhabitants of Southern Philistia, the Philistines (Zephaniah 2:5 )
Ekron - It changed hands between the Philistines and the Israelites frequently (see Philistia)
Avim, Avites - A people who once inhabited the villages of Philistia, who were destroyed by the Caphtorims, Deuteronomy 2:23 ; a remnant being left till the days of Joshua
Shur - An enclosure; a wall, a part, probably, of the Arabian desert, on the north-eastern border of Egypt, giving its name to a wilderness extending from Egypt toward Philistia (Genesis 16:7 ; 20:1 ; 25:18 ; Ex
Gath - (1 Samuel 17:4,23 ) It probably stood upon the conspicuous hill now called Tell-es-Safieh , upon the side of the plain of Philistia, at the foot of the mountains of Judah; 10 miles east of Ashdod, and about the same distance south by east of Ekron. Gath occupied a strong position, ( 2 Chronicles 11:8 ) on the border of Judah and Philistia, (1 Samuel 21:10 ; 1 Chronicles 18:1 ) and from its strength and resources forming the key of both countries, it was the scene of frequent struggles, and was often captured and recaptured
Abimelech - This seems to have been the title of the kings of Philistia, as Caesar was of the Roman emperors, and Pharaoh of the sovereigns of Egypt
Cherethims, Cherethites - Inhabitants of the southern parts of Philistia
Emmaus - ʾAmwâs, on the plain of Philistia, 22 miles from Jerusalem and 10 miles from Lydda
Cherethims - Some of the Philistine Cherethites probably colonized Crete originally, while others remained in Philistia, where they had migrated from Africa. The name Pelethites may be another form of Philistines, or possibly be from Ρeleetim , (political) "refugees" from Philistia
Lehi - " In Judah, between Philistia and the cliff Etam, now Beit Likiyeh, a village on the northern side of the wady Suleiman; at the entrance of the hill country of Judah, the outermost stronghold toward the S
Palestina, Palestine - In these passages, and in Isaiah 14:29,31 , it is usual now to translate the word Philistia (as in the R
Cherethites - The Cherethites and Pelethites were people who lived among the Philistines and who, like the Philistines, probably came originally from Crete (1 Samuel 30:14; Ezekiel 25:16; Zephaniah 2:5; see Philistia)
Gaza - (For a map of the region and details of the Old Testament history of Gaza see Philistia
Gath - Hezekiah, after Uzziah, conquered Philistia (2 Kings 18:8; Isaiah 14:29-81). Tell es Safieh occupies the site of Gath, which lay on the border between Judah and Philistia, between Shocoh and Ekron (1 Samuel 17:1; 1 Samuel 17:52). Gath was from its strength often alternately in the hands of Judah and of Philistia (2 Chronicles 11:8)
Gath - (For a map of the region and other details see Philistia
Ashdod - Ashdod was one of the ‘five cities of the Philistines’, the other four being Ashkelon, Ekron, Gaza and Gath (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18; see Philistia)
Gath - It occupied a strong position on the borders of Judah and Philistia (1 Samuel 21:10 ; 1 Chronicles 18:1 )
Philis'Tia - (Philistia was the plain on the southwest coast of Palestine
Caphtor - ... Pusey suggests there were different immigrations of the same tribe into Palestine, which afterward merged in one name: the Casluhim first; a second from the Caphtorim; a third the Cherethim or Cretans, Crete being an intermediate resting place in their migrations from whence some passed into Philistia. , 5:2) says "the inhabitants of Palestine came from Crete"; perhaps many of the Cherethim settlers in Crete from Egypt, when disturbed by Minos and the Hellenes, withdrew from Crete to Philistia, where their kinsmen were settled
Philis'Tines - ( Genesis 21:32,34 ; 26:1,8 ) Between the times of Abraham and Joshua the Philistines had changed their quarters, and had advanced northward into the plain of Philistia. Later when the Philistines, joined by the Syrians and Assyrians, made war on the kingdom of Israel, Hezekiah formed an alliance with the Egyptians, as a counterpoise to the Assyrians, and the possession of Philistia became henceforth the turning-point of the struggle between the two great empires of the East. (Isaiah 20:1,4,5 ) Under Senacherib, Philistia was again the scene of important operations. It was about this time that Philistia was traversed by vast Scythian horde on their way to Egypt. (Nehemiah 13:23,24 ) From this time the history of Philistia is absorbed in the struggles of the neighboring kingdoms
Michmash - This was the scene of a great battle fought between the army of Saul and the Philistines, who were utterly routed and pursued for some 16 miles towards Philistia as far as the valley of Aijalon
Ziklag - Conder, however, identifies it with Khirbet Zuheilikah, ruins found on three hills half a mile apart, some seventeen miles north-west of Beersheba, on the confines of Philistia, Judah, and Amalek
Hagarenes - In Psalms 83:6-8 "the tabernacles of the Hagarenes" are mentioned as distinct from the "Ishmaelites," with whom and Moab, Gebal, Ammon, Amalek, Philistia, Tyre, and Assur, they confederated to invade suddenly Jehoshaphat's land and take it in possession
mo'Din, - the great maritime lowland of Philistia
Ashkelon - (See also Philistia
Ziklag - The gift may have been a means of shortening Philistia's over-extended borders. Ziklag appears never to have been a part of Philistia proper. On returning to his base following Philistia's refusal to allow him to fight with them against Saul, David found the town had been raided and burned by the Amalekites and his family taken hostage
Watchfulness: When Special Need of - All Philistia could not have blinded Samson if Delilah's charms had not deluded him
Giants - West of the Dead Sea, around Hebron and Philistia, lived the Anakim, whose aspect so terrified the Hebrew spies, Numbers 13:33 Joshua 11:21,22
Philistines - ... The Philistines are called Pulsata or Pulista on the Egyptian monuments; the land of the Philistines (Philistia) being termed Palastu and Pilista in the Assyrian inscriptions. From Philistia the name of the land of the Philistines came to be extended to the whole of "Palestine
Philistia - Philistia is derived from the Ethiopic falasa "to emigrate," Hebrew palash , "wander. ) Successive emigrations of the same race took place into Philistia, first the Casluhim, then the Caphtorim from both of which came the Philistines, who seemingly were in subjection in Caphtor (the northern delta of Egypt), from whence "Jehovah brought them up" (Amos 9:7). Philistia is an undulating plain, 32 miles long, and from nine to 16 broad, from 30 to 300 ft. The Egyptian Pharaoh took Gezer at the head of the Philistia plain, and gave it as his daughter's marriage portion to Solomon (1 Kings 9:16-17); and Solomon fortified it and Bethhoron, to command the passes from the Philistia plain to the central region. ) Isaiah (Isaiah 14:29-32) warns Philistia, "rejoice not because the rod of him (Uzziah) that smote thee is broken; for out of the serpent's (as the Philistines regarded Uzziah) root shall come forth a cockatrice," i. the most abject poor, Hebraism; the Jews heretofore exposed to Philistia's invasions and oppression) shall feed in safety
Crete - It was at one time the homeland of a people who, in the early days of the Old Testament story, sailed east and settled on Canaan’s Mediterranean coast, where they became known as the Philistines (Deuteronomy 2:23; 1 Samuel 30:14; Jeremiah 47:4; Amos 9:7; see Philistia; CHERETHITES)
Uz - A district containing a number of kings, situated between Philistia and Egypt, or, with a different pointing of the consonants of one word, between Philistia and the country of the Bedouin ( Jeremiah 25:20 : the name not in LXX [Note: Septuagint
Ziklag - Thus Ziklag lay at the confines of Philistia, Judah, and Amalek
Megiddo - , on his march against the king of Assyria, passed through the plains of Philistia and Sharon; and King Josiah, attempting to bar his progress in the plain of Megiddo, was defeated by the Egyptians
Dream - The revelation of God's will in dreams is characteristic of the early and less perfect patriarchal times (Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:24; Genesis 37:5-10); to Solomon, 1 Kings 3:5, in commencing his reign; the beginnings of the New Testament dispensation (Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22); and the communications from God to the rulers of the pagan world powers, Philistia, Egypt, Babylon (Genesis 20:3; Genesis 40:5; Genesis 41:1); Elihu, Job 33:15; Daniel 2; Daniel 4:5, etc
Jehoram - During his reign Edom and Philistia broke free from Judah’s rule (2 Chronicles 21:8), and Arab raiders plundered Judah with much success (2 Chronicles 21:16-17)
Abel - Most likely this "great stone" was a boundary mark, or an ancient monument, in Bethshemesh, on the confines of Judah, Dan, and Philistia
Joppa - Towards the west is extended the open sea; towards the south are spread the fertile plains of Philistia, reaching as far as Gaza; towards the north, as far as Carmel, the flowery meads of Sharon present themselves; and to the east, the hills of Ephraim and Judah raise their towering heads
Jehoash - " He was afterwards involved in war with Amaziah, the king of Judah (2 Chronicles 25:23-24 ), whom he utterly defeated at Beth-shemesh, on the borders of Dan and Philistia, and advancing on Jerusalem, broke down a portion of the wall, and carried away the treasures of the temple and the palace
Assyria - " Leaving a portion of his army to continue the siege, "he advanced through the province east of Jordan, spreading fire and sword," and became master of Philistia, and took Samaria and Damascus. From an early period Assyria had entered on a conquering career, and having absorbed Babylon, the kingdoms of Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria, it conquered Phoenicia, and made Judea feudatory, and subjected Philistia and Idumea
Iron - Increased availability of iron corresponds to the period of Philistia's collapse, and 1Samuel records that the Philistines prevented smiths from working in Israel (1 Samuel 13:19-21 ). However, excavations in Philistia have uncovered no more iron implements than in Israelite cities
Iron - Increased availability of iron corresponds to the period of Philistia's collapse, and 1Samuel records that the Philistines prevented smiths from working in Israel (1 Samuel 13:19-21 ). However, excavations in Philistia have uncovered no more iron implements than in Israelite cities
Mediterranean Sea, the - Most of the important nations of ancient times were either on the Mediterranean's shores or operated in its 2,200 miles of water: Israel, Syria, Greece, Rome, Egypt, Philistia, and Phoenicia
Canaan (2) - Besides the possessions of the Israelites, the land of Canaan embraced Phœnicia on the north and Philistia on the southwest
Isa'Iah, Book of - 13-23 contain chiefly a collection of utterances, each of which is styled a "burden," fore-telling the doom of Babylon, Philistia, Moab, Ethiopia, Egypt and Tyre
Giant - ’ The Rephaim included the Anakim, the aborigines of Philistia and the southern districts of Judah ( Deuteronomy 2:11 ); the Emim , the aborigines of the Moabite country ( Deuteronomy 2:10 ); the Zamzummim , the aborigines of the Ammonite country ( Deuteronomy 2:20 ), who are perhaps to be identified with the Zuzim of Genesis 14:5 ; and the old inhabitants of Bashan ( Deuteronomy 3:11 ). We naturally find the most evident traces of them in those districts of Palestine and its borders more recently occupied by past invaders, as in the East of Jordan and Philistia
Sargon - He subdued Philistia, and brought Egypt under tribute; in his second year (720) he fought to gain Gaza; in his sixth against Egypt (715); in his ninth (712) he took Ashdod by Tartan
Adullam - On the edge of the country between Philistia and Judah, he collected his band into Adullam (Ayd el Mieh); thence, by the prophet's direction, to the hills, a four miles' march to Hareth, still within reach of his own Bethlehem
Amos - These two kings between them expanded Israelite-Judean rule from Syria in the north to Egypt in the south, and from Philistia in the west to Ammon in the east (2 Kings 14:23-27; 2 Chronicles 26:1-15)
Palestine - On the west the plains of Philistia and Sharon lie between the Mediterranean and the hills, interrupted by a ridge which, shooting out from the main highlands, terminates in the bold promontory of Carmel
Joppa - To the north stretches the Plain of Sharon, to the south the Plain of Philistia
Hagar - Her exultation so irritated Sarah that the maid had to flee from the encampment, and took refuge in the wilderness of Shur ( Genesis 16:7 , Genesis 25:18 ), between Philistia and Egypt
Palesti'na - These two forms occur in the Authorized Version but four times in all, always in poetical passages; the first in ( Exodus 15:14 ) and Isai 14:29 The second (Joel 3:4 ) In each case the Hebrew is Pelesheth , a word found, besides the above, only in ( Psalm 60:8 ; 83:7 ; 87:4 ) and Psal 108:9 In all which our translators have rendered it by "Philistia" or "Philistines. " Palestine in the Authorized Version really means nothing but Philistia. On the west this lowland interposes between the mountains and the sea, and is the plain of Philistia and of Sharon. The lower half is the plain of the Philistines-Philistia, or, as the Hebrews called it, the Shefelah or Lowland. The plain of Sharon is much narrower then Philistia. It is about 10 miles wide from the sea to the foot of the mountains, which are here of a more abrupt character than those of Philistia, and without the intermediate hilly region there occurring
Gaza - (Γάζα)... Gaza, the most southern of the five chief cities of Philistia, was important as the last place of call on the road to Egypt
Philistines - A celebrated people, who inhabited the southern seacoast of Canaan, which from them took the name of Philistia, Psalm 60:8 108:9 , or Palestine
Giants - The success of David and his heroes against Goliath and the giants of Philistia (a remnant of the old giant races) illustrates the divine principle that physical might and size are nothing worth, nay are but beaststrength, when severed from God and arrayed against the people of God
Elijah - Jezebel was daughter of the king-priest of Philistia and had married King Ahab of Israel
Palestine - Four times in KJV, found always in poetry (Exodus 15:34; Isaiah 14:29; Isaiah 14:31; Joel 3:4); same as Philistia (Psalms 60:8; Psalms 87:4; Psalms 83:7 "the Philistines". The lower half, Philistia, is wider; the upper, or Sharon, narrower. Sharon is ten miles wide from the sea to the mountain base; there are no intermediate hills, as the shephelah in Philistia. Joppa between Philistia and Sharon. The alluvial soil of Philistia is formed of washings from the highlands by winter rains
Judges, the Book of - Each only delivered one part of Israel: Shamgar the region toward Philistia; Deborah and Barak northern Israel (Judges 4:10); so Gideon (Judges 6:35), Jephthah, eastern Israel; Samson, Judah, Dan and the region adjoining Philistia. ... The three first servitudes brought Israel under the nations destined to scourge it in after history: Moab, Philistia, Mesopotamia or Babylon
Philistim - It is certain that, in the time of Abraham, the Canaanites were in possession of the rest of the land, to which they gave their name: but the extreme south of Philistia, or Palestine, was even then possessed by the Philistines, whose king, Abimelech, reigned at Gerar. And the voice of prophecy, which was not silent respecting it, proclaimed the fate that awaited it, in terms as contradictory, at the time, to every natural suggestion, as they are descriptive of what Philistia now actually is
Tiglath-Pileser - 734 the Assyrian army invaded Pilishta (Philistia) according to Rost, the Mediterranean coastland S
Army - Judaea and the northern kingdom Israel being hilly, were little suited for chariots and horsemen, except in the plains of Esdraelon and Philistia, and toward Egypt and Syria
Philistia, Philistines - The territory of Philistia consisted largely of the plainlands that stretched along the Mediterranean coast of Palestine
Amos - Amos 1:1 to Amos 2:13; the sins of Syria, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, Moab, the neighbors of Israel and Judah Amos 2:4 to Amos 6:14; Israel's own state and consequent punishment; the same coasts "from the entering in of Hamath," which Jeroboam has just recovered from Syria, shall be "afflicted," and the people carried into "captivity beyond Damascus" (Amos 5:27)
Palestine - Usually it is divided into three sections: (1) the Plain of Philistia, roughly from south of Gaza to Joppa (Tel Aviv); (2) the Plain of Sharon, from Joppa north to the promontory of the Carmel chain; and (3) the detached Plain of Acco, which merges with the Plain of Esdraelon, the historic gateway inland and to the regions to the north and east. ... Further south is the Plain of Philistia. ” The name has been inaccurately applied to the Plain of Philistia, but the towns assigned by the Old Testament to the Shephelah are all situated in the low hills rather than the plain
Palestine - When the Israelites first occupied Canaan, they met some of their strongest opposition from the Philistines, the people from whom Palestine takes its name (see CANAAN; Philistia)
Samson - Judge of Israel for 20 years (Judges 15:20; Judges 16:31), namely, in the Danite region near Philistia
Ezekiel - ... After recording a number of judgments against foreign nations – Ammon, Moab, Edom, Philistia (25:1-17), Tyre (26:1-28:19), Sidon (28:20-26), Egypt (29:1-32:32) – Ezekiel spoke of a new phase in his work, namely, the building up of the people in preparation for the return from exile (33:1-20)
Canaan - The territory stretched along the Mediterranean coast from Phoenicia (Sidon) in the north to Philistia (Gaza) in the south, and extended inland to the hills of Syria and the valley of the Jordan River (Genesis 10:15-19)
Damascus - After this, Hazael of Damascus exercised strong influence, gaining influence in Israel, Judah, and Philistia (2 Kings 10:32-33 )
Scythian - , buying off these northern invaders who had come as far south as Philistia
Pharaoh - He took Gaza of the Philistines (Jeremiah 47:1), and made himself master of Philistia and most of Phoenicia; attacked Sidon, and fought by sea with Tyre; and "so firmly did he think himself established in his kingdom that he believed not even a god could east hint down" (Herodotus ii
Obadiah - ... Expanding southward, westward, eastward, and northward, they shall acquire additionally Edom, Philistia, and northern Canaan to Zarephath (Sarepta near Sidon)
Judah, Tribe And Kingdom - For Judah’s conflict with the Philistines, who occupied the coastal plain, see Philistia
Palestine - Originally denoted only the sea-coast of the land of Canaan inhabited by the Philistines (Exodus 15:14 ; Isaiah 14:29,31 ; Joel 3:4 ), and in this sense exclusively the Hebrew name Pelesheth (rendered "Philistia" in Psalm 60:8 ; 83:7 ; 87:4 ; 108:9 ) occurs in the Old Testament
Ephraim (1) - Ephraim lay near the highways from Egypt and Philistia to Galilee and from Jordan to the sea
Joel - Judgment was pronounced against Phoenicia and Philistia (Joel 3:4 ) and eventually upon all nations as they were judged by God in the Valley of Jehoshaphat, which literally means “The Lord judges” (Joel 3:2 , 3:12 )
Proselytes - ) Hezekiah's triumph over Sennacherib was followed by many bringing gifts: unto Jehovah to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 32:23); this suggested the prophecy in Psalm 87 that Rahab (Egypt) and Babylon (whose king Merodach Baladan had sent a friendly embassy to Hezekiah), Philistia, Tyre, and Ethiopia should be spiritually born (Psalms 51:5; Psalms 51:10; Psalms 22:31; Isaiah 66:8; John 3:3; John 3:5; both Old and New Testament teach the need of the new birth) in Jerusalem as proselytes
Judah, Kingdom of - ... Israel interposed between Judah and Syria and Assyria; and Egypt in its military marches toward Assyria took the coast line of Philistia, not through Judah
Josiah - If he had come by Philistia Josiah would have met him there, and not allowed him to advance to Megiddo
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - His decision for some nations, such as Tyre, Sidon, Moab, Philistia, and Assyria, will be punishment (Joel 3:4-13 ; cf. Joel graphically depicts a roll call of Tyre, Sidon, and Philistia
Canaan - The lowland especially was the country of the Canaanites; the plains between the Mediterranean on one side, and the hills of Benjamin, Judah, and Ephraim on the other; the shephelah , or low hills of Philistia, on the S. ... THE VALLEY, or LOW HILLS (shephelah ), is the fertile region between the HIGHER HILLS and the coast, from Carmel to Gaza; including Philistia on the S
Ezekiel, Book of - The prophecies are against Ammon, Moab, Edom, and Philistia
Idolatry - Each nation, however, had its own provincial Baal with a specific name or title Chemosh of Moab, Molech of Ammon, Dagon of Philistia, Hadad-Rimmon of Syria
Judaea - The upper portion (Sharon) is noted for its rich pasturage; the lower (Philistia) for its vast grain-fields, which have yielded enormous crops without the use of fertilizers, except such as nature has distributed over its surface from the wash and waste of the mountains, for forty centuries
Jeremiah - ... Finally there is a collection of messages for foreign nations: Egypt (46:1-28), Philistia (47:1-7), Moab and Ammon (48:1-49:6), Edom (49:7-22), Damascus, Kedar, Hazor and Elam (49:23-39), and Babylon (50:1-51:64)
Judaea - The upper portion (Sharon) is noted for its rich pasturage; the lower (Philistia) for its vast grain-fields, which have yielded enormous crops without the use of fertilizers, except such as nature has distributed over its surface from the wash and waste of the mountains, for forty centuries
Moab - Moab contrasts with Ammon, Edom, Philistia, Amalek, Midian, as wealthy, abounding in vineyards, fruitful fields, and gardens, and civilized to a degree next Israel
Saul - " Having cut off his head, they sent it with his weapons to Philistia, and hung up the skull in the temple of Dagon at Ashdod
Exodus, the - Instead of the direct way to Canaan by Philistia on the S
Priest, Priesthood - ... Priests of foreign gods in foreign lands referred to in the Old Testament are Potiphera, Joseph's father-in-law, who was a "priest of On" in Egypt (Genesis 41:45,50 ; 46:20 ), the whole priestly organization in Egypt (Genesis 47:22,26 ), the "priests of Dagon" in Philistia (1 Samuel 5:5 ; 6:2 ), the "priests of Chemosh" in Moab (Jeremiah 48:7 ), and the "priests of Malcam" in Ammon (Jeremiah 49:3 )
Assyria, History And Religion of - Tiglath-pileser, in response, campaigned against Philistia (734 B
Assur - ... By the end of Esarhaddon's reign Hamath, Damascus, and Samaria had been absorbed, Judaea made tributary, Philistia and Idumea subjected, Babylon recovered, and cities planted in Media
Sin - Damascus, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, and Moab, as well as Judah and Israel, all come under the displeasure of the prophet Amos
Isaiah - The petty states of Palestine—Syria, Philistia, Moab, Edom, Ammon, Arabia, Tyre, Israel, and Judah—were ultimately conquered or made tributary to Assyria
Psalms - Do we pray for victory over Moab, Edom, and Philistia; or for deliverance from Babylon? There are no such nations, no such places in the world
Zechariah, the Book of - Alexander's conquests in Syria and Philistia (Zechariah 9:1-8)
Solomon - )... Among his buildings were the famous Tadmor or Palmyra in the wilderness, to carry on commerce with inland Asia, and store cities in Hamath; Bethhoron, the Upper and the Nether, on the border toward Philistia and Egypt; Hazor and Megiddo, guarding the plain of Esdraelon; Baalath or Baalbek, etc
Judea - Judea Proper, situated in 31 40' north latitude, was bounded on the north by Samaria, on the west by the Mediterranean, on the east by the river Jordan, on the south by Arabia Petraea; and comprised the ancient settlements of Judah, Benjamin, Dan, and Simeon, with Philistia and Idumea
Jeru'Salem - ... From the great maritime plain of Philistia and Sharon
Jerusalem - From the great maritime plain of Philistia and Sharon
Palestine - ] Philistia ], being derived from that of the Philistines , properly belongs only to the strip of coast-land south of Carmel, which was the ancient territory of that people
Jerusalem - The route from Philistia and Sharon was by Joppa and Lydda, up the two Bethherons to the high ground at Gibeon, whence it turned S
Moses - Not even does Moses lead them the way of Philistia which, as being near, wisdom would suggest, but knowing their unwarlike character avoids it; Moses guides them into a defile with mountains on either side and the Red Sea in front, from whence escape from the Egyptian disciplined pursuers, who repented of letting them go, seemed hopeless, especially as Israel consisted of spiritless men, encumbered with women and with children
Babylon - " It was prophesied of Ammon that it should be a stable for camels and a couching place for flocks; and of Philistia, that it should be cottages for shepherds, and a pasture of flocks