Places Study on Pamphylia

Places Study on Pamphylia

Acts 2: Phrygia, and Pamphylia, in Egypt, and in the parts of Libya about Cyrene, and strangers of Rome, Jews and proselytes,
Acts 13: Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.
Acts 14: And after they had passed throughout Pisidia, they came to Pamphylia.
Acts 15: But Paul thought not good to take him with them, who departed from them from Pamphylia, and went not with them to the work.
Acts 27: And when we had sailed over the sea of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra, a city of Lycia.

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Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Pamphylia
Pamphylia (pam-fíl'i-ah), of every tribe. A Roman province in the south of Asia Minor. It was in Pamphylia that Paul first entered Asia Minor, after preaching the gospel in Cyprus. Acts 13:13; Acts 14:24; Acts 27:6.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
Paul and his company, loosing from Paphos, sailed north-west and came to Perga, the capital of Pamphylia (Acts 13:13,14 ), a province about the middle of the southern sea-board of Asia Minor. It lay between Lycia on the west and Cilicia on the east. There were strangers from Pamphylia at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost (2:10).

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
The province of Pamphylia was in southern Asia Minor, bordering the Mediterranean Sea (Acts 27:5). Paul visited the province twice on his first missionary journey. The Bible does not mention his preaching there when he passed through it the first time (Acts 13:13-14), but on his return he preached in the main town of Perga. He then went to the nearby port of Attalia, from where he sailed back to his home church in Syria (Acts 14:24-26). (For map see ACTS, BOOK OF.)

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Pamphylia
A nation made up of every tribe
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
District in the south of Asia Minor, having Cilicia on the east and Lycia on the S.W. Acts 2:10 ; Acts 13:13 ; Acts 14:24 ; Acts 15:38 ; Acts 27:5 .

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
Southern province of Asia Minor, bounded on the N. by Pisidia, from which it was separated by the Taurus range, W. by Lycia, E. by Cilicia, S. by the Levant. In Paul's time it with Lycia formed a province under the emperor Claudius. His "peril of robbers" was in crossing Taurus, the Pisidians being notorious for robbery. He visited Pamphylia at his first missionary tour, sailing from Paphos in Cyprus to Perga in Pamphylia on the river Cestrus, where Mark forsook him (Acts 13:13; Acts 15:38). They stayed only a short time then, but on their return front the interior "they preached the word" (Acts 14:24-25). Then they "went down (sea being lower than land) to Attalia," the chief seaport of Pamphylia. The minute accuracy of the geographical order, confirming genuineness, is observable, when, in coasting westward, he is said to "sail over the sea of Cilicia, and Pamphylia." Also Acts 13:13-14, "from Perga to Antioch in Pisidia," and Acts 14:24, "after Pisidia ... to Pamphylia," in returning to the coast from inland.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pamphylia
a province of Asia Minor which gives name to that part of the Mediterranean Sea which washes its coast, Acts 27:5 . To the south it is bounded by the Mediterranean, and to the north by Pisidia; having Lycia to the west, and Cilicia to the east. Paul and Barnabas preached at Perga, in Pamphylia, Acts 13:13 ; Acts 14:24 .

Holman Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
(pam fihl' ih uh) One of the provinces of Asia Minor. Located in what is now southern Turkey, Pamphylia was a small district on the coast. It measured about eighty miles long and twenty miles wide. One of the chief cities was Perga, where John Mark left Paul and Barnabas during the first missionary journey (Acts 13:13 ). Other important cities were the ports of Side and Attalia. The New Testament records no other significant events for the early church in Pamphylia, perhaps because of the concentration of non-Hellenized peoples in the region. This would make the spread of the gospel slower and harder to achieve.



American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Pamphylia
A province of Asia Minor, having Cilicia east. Lycia west, Pisidia north, and the Mediterranean south. It is opposite to Cyprus, and the sea between the coast and the island is called the "sea of Pamphylia." The chief city of Pamphylia was Perga, where Paul and Barnabas preached, Acts 13:13 ; 14:24 .

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Pamphylia
PAMPHYLIA. The name of a district on the S. coast of Asia Minor, lying between Lycia and Cilicia. Strictly speaking, it consisted of a plain 80 miles long and (at its widest part) 20 miles broad, lying between Mt. Taurus and the sea. After a.d. 74 the name was applied to a Roman province which included the mountainous country to the N., more properly called Pisidia, but until that time it was used only in the narrower sense. The plain was shut in from all N. winds, but was well watered by springs from the Taurus ranges. Through lack of cultivation it has in modern times become very malarious, and in ancient times, though better cultivated, the district was never favourable to the development of a vigorous population. Moreover, it was very isolated except by sea, for the mountains to the N. had no good roads, and were infested by brigands. Even Alexander had to fight his way through them.

The name is probably derived from the Pamphyli , one of the three Dorian tribes, and it is likely that Dorian settlers entered Pamphylia at the time of the other Dorian migrations. But the Greek element never prevailed, and though Side and Aspendos were half-Greek cities in the 5th cent. b.c., the Greek that they spoke was very corrupt and was written in a corrupt alphabet. Side is said to have earned its prosperity as the market of Cilician pirates. The town of Attalia was founded in the 2nd century. But more important was the native town of Perga, situated inland and having apparently a port of its own on the river Cestrus at a distance of 5 miles. It was a religious centre., where a goddess ‘Artemis of Perga’ was worshipped, her rites corresponding to those associated with Diana of the Ephesians, and being therefore more Asiatic than Greek. The ruins of the city date from the period of the Seleucid kings of Syria. Pamphylia was in turn subject to Persia, Macedonia, Syria, Pergamus, and Rome.

Paul and Barnabas on their first missionary journey crossed from Cyprus to Perga, but seem to have gone straight on to Antioch without preaching. It was at Perga that John Mark left them (Acts 13:13 ). On the return journey, before taking ship at Attalia, they preached at Perga ( Acts 14:25 ), but by this time they had definitely determined to ‘turn to the Gentiles’ (cf. Acts 13:46 ). Christianity was slow in taking hold of Pamphylia, there is no mention of it in 1 Peter 1:1 and this was probably due partly to the absence of Jewish centres, partly to the backwardness of the district. Christianity made way most quickly in the chief centres of thought. See Perga.

A. E. Hillard.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Pamphylia
A province of Asia. Here Paul came in his travels. (Acts 13:13; Act 14:24) The name is taken from the Greek, and signifies altogether amiable or lovely.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Pamphylia
(Παμφυλία)

Pamphylia was the ancient name of a flat and low-lying country in the south of Asia Minor, 80 miles long from E. to W., and 20 miles broad in its widest part, skirted by the Bay of Adalia, and enclosed by a rough semicircle of lofty and precipitous mountains of the Taurus range. As no pass corresponding to the Cilician Gates afforded freedom of access to the interior, Pamphylia was always isolated. Its chief maritime cities-Attalia, Perga and Side-had to deal only with a limited traffic, and never rose to any great importance. Its climate, too, greatly interfered with its progress. The hot, moist, enervating plain, rarely swept by bracing northern winds, was unsuitable for a race of hardy colonists, and though many Greeks and some Jews (1 Maccabees 15:23, Acts 2:10) settled in its towns, the native Anatolian elements were too strong for an exotic Hellenism, so that Pamphylia as a whole remained one of the least civilized parts of Asia Minor. It was therefore late in attaining the dignity of Roman provincial government. Dio Cassius (lx. 17) indicates that Claudius instituted the province of Lycia-Pamphylia in a.d. 43, but Mommsen has proved by means of a recently discovered inscription ‘that Pamphylia was a distinct procuratorial province for some time later, then was connected with Galatia for a short time, and at last was united to Lycia by Vespasian’ (W. M. Ramsay, Pauline and other Studies, 1906, p. 265).

Paul and Barnabas crossed Pamphylia in both the outward and the homeward part of their first missionary tour. Landing at the river-harbour of Perga, they merely ‘passed through from’ the city (Acts 13:14), hastening northward over the Taurus to Antioch in Pisidia. Combining St. Luke’s narrative with Galatians 4:13, Ramsay infers that, while the original intention of the apostles was to carry on a prolonged mission in Pamphylia, which seemed, after Cilicia, to have the next claim to the gospel, a sudden illness-probably malarial fever-prostrated St. Paul and compelled them to change their plan and seek the cooler and more invigorating uplands of central Asia Minor (St. Paul the Traveller, p. 93, The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. 61 ff.). A. C. McGiffert agrees that malarial fever was probably the ‘infirmity of the flesh’ which led St. Paul to preach to the Galatians, but regards it as more likely that the illness, though contracted in the Pamphylian plain, did not show itself until St. Paul was labouring in Antioch (Apostolic Age, 1897, p. 177). About two years later the return journey was made by Perga and Attalia (Acts 14:25), and on this occasion the gospel was preached in the former city, but apparently little impression was made. Christianity, which always had the best chance of success where Hellenism and Judaism had already prepared the soil, was late in taking root in backward and uncivilized Pamphylia. The provinces named in 1 Peter 1:1 as having Christian converts within their borders sum up the whole of Asia Minor north of the Taurus, but Pamphylia and Lycia are conspicuous by their absence. Had these lands contained any considerable body of ‘the elect,’ the fact that they were regarded as ‘without (i.e. to the south of) the Taurus’ would not have prevented them from being enumerated with the other provinces.

Literature.-W. M. Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller, London, 1895, p. 89 f.; K. Lanckoronski, Städte Pamphyliens und Pisidiens, vol. i.: ‘Pamphylien,’ Vienna, 1890.

James Strahan.

Sentence search

Pamphylia - Pamphylia (pam-fíl'i-ah), of every tribe. It was in Pamphylia that Paul first entered Asia Minor, after preaching the gospel in Cyprus
Pamphylia - He visited Pamphylia at his first missionary tour, sailing from Paphos in Cyprus to Perga in Pamphylia on the river Cestrus, where Mark forsook him (Acts 13:13; Acts 15:38). Then they "went down (sea being lower than land) to Attalia," the chief seaport of Pamphylia. The minute accuracy of the geographical order, confirming genuineness, is observable, when, in coasting westward, he is said to "sail over the sea of Cilicia, and Pamphylia. to Pamphylia," in returning to the coast from inland
Pamphylia - It is opposite to Cyprus, and the sea between the coast and the island is called the "sea of Pamphylia. " The chief city of Pamphylia was Perga, where Paul and Barnabas preached, Acts 13:13 ; 14:24
Pamphylia - Paul and his company, loosing from Paphos, sailed north-west and came to Perga, the capital of Pamphylia (Acts 13:13,14 ), a province about the middle of the southern sea-board of Asia Minor. There were strangers from Pamphylia at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost (2:10)
Lycia - (lihc' ih uh) Geographical name indicating the projection on the southern coast of Asia Minor between Caria and Pamphylia
Attalia - Seaport of Pamphylia, near Perga, visited by Paul and Barnabas
Perga - City of Pamphylia in Asia Minor
Perga - A city of Pamphylia, Acts 13:13 ; 14:25 . It was one of the most considerable cities in Pamphylia; and when that province was divided into two parts, this city became the metropolis of one part, and side of the other
Attalia - A seaport town of Pamphylia, Acts 14:25, named from its founder, Attalus; later it was called Satalia, and now Adalia
Perga - On the river Cestrus, then navigable up to the city; in Pamphylia. (See Pamphylia. Paul came in May when the passes would be cleared of snow, and would join a Pamphylian company on their way to the Pisidian heights (Acts 13:13), and would return with them on his way from Antioch in Pisidia (Acts 14:24-25)
Pisidia - District of Asia Minor lying between Pamphylia and Phrygia, through which Paul passed
Pamphylia - (Παμφυλία)... Pamphylia was the ancient name of a flat and low-lying country in the south of Asia Minor, 80 miles long from E. As no pass corresponding to the Cilician Gates afforded freedom of access to the interior, Pamphylia was always isolated. The hot, moist, enervating plain, rarely swept by bracing northern winds, was unsuitable for a race of hardy colonists, and though many Greeks and some Jews (1 Maccabees 15:23, Acts 2:10) settled in its towns, the native Anatolian elements were too strong for an exotic Hellenism, so that Pamphylia as a whole remained one of the least civilized parts of Asia Minor. 17) indicates that Claudius instituted the province of Lycia-Pamphylia in a. 43, but Mommsen has proved by means of a recently discovered inscription ‘that Pamphylia was a distinct procuratorial province for some time later, then was connected with Galatia for a short time, and at last was united to Lycia by Vespasian’ (W. ... Paul and Barnabas crossed Pamphylia in both the outward and the homeward part of their first missionary tour. Luke’s narrative with Galatians 4:13, Ramsay infers that, while the original intention of the apostles was to carry on a prolonged mission in Pamphylia, which seemed, after Cilicia, to have the next claim to the gospel, a sudden illness-probably malarial fever-prostrated St. Paul to preach to the Galatians, but regards it as more likely that the illness, though contracted in the Pamphylian plain, did not show itself until St. Christianity, which always had the best chance of success where Hellenism and Judaism had already prepared the soil, was late in taking root in backward and uncivilized Pamphylia. The provinces named in 1 Peter 1:1 as having Christian converts within their borders sum up the whole of Asia Minor north of the Taurus, but Pamphylia and Lycia are conspicuous by their absence
Lycia - Pamphylia is on E. Its two chief towns Patara and Myra Paul visited, during the period when Lycia and Pamphylia in Claudius' reign were combined under one proconsul (Acts 21:1; Acts 27:5)
Lycia - It was formerly a part of Pamphylia, but increased in importance and became a separate district, with Myra for its capital
Perga - An inland city of Pamphylia about 12 miles from Attalia on the coast, but possessing a river harbour of its own on the Cestrus 5 miles away. It was the chief native city of Pamphylia, and never seems to have come much under Greek influence, but it had a coinage of its own from the 2nd cent. See Pamphylia. 1084 we find Attalia made a metropolitan bishopric, and it is the only bishopric in Pamphylia now
si'de, - a city on the coast of Pamphylia, 10 or 12 miles to the east of the river Eurymedon
Phase'Lis, - a town on the coast of Asia Minor, on the confines of Lycia and Pamphylia, and consequently ascribed by the ancient writers sometimes to one and sometimes to the other
Pamphylia - Located in what is now southern Turkey, Pamphylia was a small district on the coast. The New Testament records no other significant events for the early church in Pamphylia, perhaps because of the concentration of non-Hellenized peoples in the region
Pamphyl'ia - It was in Pamphylia that St. ( Acts 13:13 ) The two missionaries finally left Pamphylia by its chief seaport Attalia
Per'ga - (earthy ), a city of Pamphylia, ( Acts 13:13 ) situated on the river Cestius, at a distance of 60 stadia (7 1/2 miles) from its mouth, and celebrated in antiquity for the worship of Artemis (Diana)
Pisidia - a province of Asia Minor, having Lycaonia to the north, Pamphylia to the south, Cilicia and Cappadocia to the east, and the province of Asia to the west
Attalia - A seaport in Pamphylia, at the mouth of the river Catarrhactes, visited by Paul and Barnabas on their way from Perga to Antioch, Acts 14:25
Lycia - A province in the southwest of Asia Minor bounded west by Caria, east by Pamphylia, north by Phrygia and Pisidia, and south by the Mediterranean
Lycia - Lycia (lĭsh'i-ah), a region of Asia Minor, on the Mediterranean, between Caria and Pamphylia
Attali'a - (from Attalus ), a coast-town of Pamphylia, mentioned ( Acts 14:25 ) It was built by Attalus Philadelphus, king of Pergamos, and named after the monarch
Side, - SIDE , a Greek colony, was situated on the coast of Pamphylia, on a low promontory about 10 miles E
Pamphylia - Paul and Barnabas preached at Perga, in Pamphylia, Acts 13:13 ; Acts 14:24
Pisidia - Paul twice visited Pisidia, passing directly north from Perga to Antioch, Acts 13:14, and again returning through Pisidia to Pamphylia
Attalia - A town on the coast of Pamphylia, not far from the mouth of the river Catarrhactes, founded and named by Attalus II
Cilic'ia - ( the land of Celix ), a maritime province int he southeast of Asia Minor, bordering on Pamphylia in the west, Lycaonia and Cappadocia in the north, and Syria in the east
Pamphylia - Pamphylia. ... The name is probably derived from the Pamphyli , one of the three Dorian tribes, and it is likely that Dorian settlers entered Pamphylia at the time of the other Dorian migrations. Pamphylia was in turn subject to Persia, Macedonia, Syria, Pergamus, and Rome. Christianity was slow in taking hold of Pamphylia, there is no mention of it in 1 Peter 1:1 and this was probably due partly to the absence of Jewish centres, partly to the backwardness of the district
Perga - The capital of Pamphylia, on the coast of Asia Minor
Pamphylia - The province of Pamphylia was in southern Asia Minor, bordering the Mediterranean Sea (Acts 27:5)
Cilicia - Cilicia (sĭ-lĭsh'ĭ-ah), the southeasterly province of Asia Minor, having Cappadocia on the north, Syria on the east, the Mediterranean Sea on the south, and Pamphylia and Pisidia (?) on the west
Pisidia - A province of Asia Minor, separated from the Mediterranean by Pamphylia, lying on Mount Taurus and the high table land north of it, and running up between Phrygia and Lycaonia as far as Antioch its capital
Pisid'ia - (pitchy ) was a district in Asia Minor north of Pamphylia, and reached to and was partly included in Phrygia
Pisidia - by Pamphylia, E
Lycia - a country of Asia Minor, having Phrygia on the north, Pamphylia on the east, the Mediterranean on the south, and Caria on the west
Pisidia - (pih ssih di' uh) Small area in the province of Galatia in southern Asia Minor bounded by Pamphylia, Phrygia, and Lyconia
Pisidia - of the plains of Pamphylia. Until then it was dealt with as part of the province of Galatia, but at that date Vespasian attached a considerable portion of it to Pamphylia, in which province no great military force was maintained
Nestorius, Bishop of Side - of Side in Pamphylia Prima (Le Quien, i
Lycia - 74 Vespasian formed the united province of Lycia-Pamphylia. Among the provinces addressed in 1 Peter 1:1 as having been partly evangelized, neither Lycia nor Pamphylia-both south of the Taurus-finds a place
Asia - The Asia spoken of in the Bible is Asia Minor, a peninsula which lies between the Euxine or Black sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean, and which formerly included the provinces of Phrygia, Cilicia, Pamphylia, Caria, Lycia, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Galatia, Lycaonia, and Pisidia
Asia - In Acts 2:9,10 'Asia' does not include Cappadocia, Pontus, Phrygia, and Pamphylia, which are all included in Asia Minor
Cilicia - The south-eastern province of Asia Minor, bounded north by the Taurus range, separating it from Cappadocia, Lycaonia, and Isauria, south by the Mediterranean, east by Syria, and west by Pamphylia
Lycia - 74 was formed into a double province along with Pamphylia
Sea - ... The 'SEA OF CILICIA AND Pamphylia,'Acts 27:5 , is the N
Mark or Marcus - He was also the companion of Paul and Barnabas in their journey through Greece to Antioch, Perga, and Pamphylia, at which last place he left them and returned to Jerusalem, much to the dissatisfaction of Paul, Acts 13:5 , etc
Apostolici - Apostolici , one of the names adopted by an ascetic sect in Phrygia, Cilicia, and Pamphylia
Dispersion, the Jews of the, - Pamphylia; (3) Egypt
Goiim - One Greek manuscript tradition points to Pamphylia, which means “rich in peoples
Mark, John - They went from Antioch to Cyprus and then on to Pamphylia, where Mark left them and returned to Jerusalem (Acts 13:13 )
Galatia - , Pamphylia and Cilicia on the S
Mark - 47) as their "minister," but from some cause turned back when they reached Perga in Pamphylia (Acts 12:25 ; 13:13 )
Cilicia - , Pamphylia on the W
Sisinnius, Bishop of Novatianists - Together with Theodotus of Antioch he composed a synodic letter against the Thessalians, in the name of the Novatianist bishops assembled at Constantinople for his consecration, addressed to Berinianus, Amphilochius, and other bishops of Pamphylia (Phot
Amphilochius, Bishop of Sida - of Sida in Pamphylia. He was urged, as one of the Pamphylian metropolitans, to take measures against them in encyclical letters written by two successive bps
Pisidia - by the coast-land of Pamphylia, on the W. It was a land of beautiful lakes-Limnai, Caralis, Ascania, and others-and of torrents growing into rivers-the Cestrus, the Eurymedon, and the Melas-which discharged themselves into the Pamphylian Sea. 74 Vespasian transferred a great part of Pisidia to the new double province of Lycia-Pamphylia
Theodotus, Patriarch of Antioch - 426, and united in the synodical letter addressed by the bishops then assembled to the bishops of Pamphylia against the Massalian heresy (Socr
Euchites - The Messalians banished from Syria went to Pamphylia, and there met new antagonists. , mentions the proceedings in Pamphylia before mentioning those which resulted in the banishment of the Messalians to Pamphylia. In Pamphylia the contest lasted for several years. of Lycaonia and Pamphylia, obtained from the council a confirmation of the decrees made against the Euchites at Constantinople in 426 and the anathematization of the Messalian book, Asceticus , passages from which Valerian laid before the synod (Mansi, iv
Dispersion - " In the assembly on Pentecost the several dispersions were represented:... (1) Parthians, Mesopotamia;... (2) Judaea (Syria), Pamphylia;... (3) Egypt, Greece;... (4) Romans
Cyprus - Barnabas visited his native island again, with his nephew Mark, when Paul had refused to allow Mark's attendance because of his former departure from them from Pamphylia, instead of going forward with them to the work (Acts 15:36-39)
Loose - ... Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga, in Pamphylia
Paphos - Originally no more than the port of Old Paphos, it possessed a good harbour, from which the apostles sailed for Pamphylia (Acts 13:13)
Philippus, of Side - , a native of the maritime town of Side in Pamphylia, the birthplace of Troilus the sophist, whose kinsman he was proud of reckoning himself
Barnabas - delegates of the church (Acts 14:14), (Paul was also counted with the Lord's apostles by a special call: Galatians 1:1-17) they made their first missionary journey to Cyprus and Pamphylia, Pisidia, Lycaonia, and back to Antioch, A. But in consequence of Barnabas desiring to take with them John Mark, his sister's son, and Paul opposing it because of Mark's desertion at Pamphylia in the previous journey, so sharp a contention arose that they separated; and while Paul, with Silas, "being recommended by the brethren unto the grace of God" (which marks their approval of Paul's course) "went through Syria and Cilicia confirming the churches," Barnabas took Mark with him to Cyprus, his native island
Mark, - " ( Acts 13:8 ) With them he visited Cyprus; but at Perga in Pamphylia, (Acts 13:13 ) when they were about to enter upon the more arduous part of their mission, he left them, and, for some unexplained reason, returned to Jerusalem to his mother and his home
Cilicia - of Asia Minor, bounded on the west by Pamphylia, on the north by Lycaonia and Cappadocia, and on the east by the Amanus range
Barnabas - They preached at Perga in Pamphylia without much success, by reason of the obstinacy and malice of the Jews; but being come to Iconium, they made many converts
Atticus, Archbaptist of Constantinople - He wrote to the bishops of Pamphylia and to Amphilochius of Iconium, calling on them to drive out the Messalians (Phot
Mark (John) - Mark remained with the Apostles on their journey through Cyprus, but left them at Perga in Pamphylia ( Acts 13:13 ) either from cowardice, or, more probably, because the journey to Pisidian Antioch and beyond, involving work among distant Gentiles, was a change of plan which he did not approve (Ramsay)
Province - 25), Thracia, Pamphylia (established b
Mark, John - Mark readily accompanied him as "minister" (hufretes , "subordinate") to the country of his kindred; but had not the spiritual strength to overcome his Jewish prejudices which he probably imbibed from his spiritual father Peter (Galatians 2:11-14), so as to accompany Paul the apostle of the Gentiles further than Perga of Pamphylia, in his first missionary tour to the pagan
Eustathius (3), Bishop of Berrhoea - He was a native of Side in Pamphylia (Hieron
Mark - Not long after, he set out from Antioch with those Apostles upon a journey, which they undertook by the direction of the Holy Spirit, for the purpose of preaching the Gospel in different countries: but he soon left them, probably without sufficient reason, in Perga in Pamphylia, and went to Jerusalem, Acts 13
Galatia - 36, Castor’s Galatian dominions and Pamphylia were added to Amyntas’ kingdom
Procurator - The following provinces among others were governed at one time or another by them-the two Mauretaniae, Raetia, Noricum, Alpes Maritimae, Alpes Cottiae, Judaea , Cappadocia, Epirus, the Hellespont, Corsica, Sardinia, Bithynia, Pamphylia
Barnabas - Soon after their return to Antioch they were solemnly set apart by the Church for special evangelization work, and started on what is usually called the first missionary journey, in the course of which they visited Cyprus and the southern parts of Asia Minor, accompanied as far as Perga in Pamphylia by John Mark (q
Roads And Travel - 24) that ‘perils of robbers’ refers to the journey from Perga in Pamphylia across Mt. Reaching land at Attaleia in the province of Pamphylia they sailed up the river Cestrus as far as Perga. His province, named Cilicia, comprised a very large territory, indeed the whole of what was afterwards Southern Galatia, as well as Lycia, Pamphylia, Cilicia (proper), etc
Amphilochius, Archbishop of Iconium - He presided over a synod of 25 bishops assembled at Sida in Pamphylia, in which the Messalians were condemned, and his energy seems to have instigated the religious crusade which led to the extirpation of this heresy (Photius, Bibl
Province - The important Imperial provinces, which required the presence of an army, were twenty-one in number: Suria (Syria), Hispania Tarraconensis, Germania Superior, Germania Inferior, Britannia, Pannonia Superior, Pannonia Inferior, Mcesia Superior, Mcesia Inferior, Dalmatia, Lusitania, Gallia Aquitanica, Gallia Lugudunensis, Gallia Belgica, Galatia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Cilicia et Syria et PhCEnice, Numidia, Cappadocia,_ each governed by a legatus Augusti pro praetore, and Egypt, governed by an equestrian praefectus aegypti, acting for his master the Emperor, who reigned as king of Egypt
Chronology of the New Testament - First Missionary Journey, to Cyprus, Acts 13:4 ; Pamphylia, and Southern Galatia (Pisidian Antioch, Acts 13:14 ; Iconium, Acts 13:51 ; Lystra, Acts 14:6 ; Derbe, Acts 14:20 ), and back by Attalia to Antioch, Acts 14:26 [so HR; TL give one year less]
Ephesians, Book of - 45-48, established Christianity in Cilicia, Pamphylia, and Phrygia
Epiphanius, Bishop of Salamis - Soon after, several presbyters of Suedra in Pamphylia invoked his assistance in their controversy with Arians and Macedonians
Paul - The two then proceeded about 100 miles inland, passing through Pamphylia, Pisidia, and Lycaonia
Galatians, Epistle to the - Galatian theory; for the very thing that one attacked with an illness in the low-lying lands of Pamphylia would do would be to go to the high uplands of Pisidian Antioch
Trade And Commerce - Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia [Ramsay, Historical Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians, London, 1899, map opposite to p
Roman Law in the nt - of the provinces of Mcesia Superior and Thracia, which are not referred to in the NT, and do not contain any of the places there mentioned; Pamphylia; Lycia
Gospels - Mark, from love of ease and home, as well as Jewish prejudice, shrank from carrying the gospel to the heathen of Pamphylia; but by subsequent zeal he so regained Paul's favour that the apostle desired Luke to bring him, saying "he is profitable to me for the ministry" (2 Timothy 4:11)
Paul - At Perga in Pamphylia Mark forsook him and Barnabas
Physician - The school was founded by Athenaios of Attaleia in Pamphylia
Roman Empire - Lycia was united to Pamphylia as a province under one governor in 43
Trade And Commerce - Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia [Ramsay, Historical Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians, London, 1899, map opposite to p
Paul - 45, and preached the Gospel successively at Salamis and Paphos, two cities of the isle of Cyprus, at Perga in Pamphylia, Antioch in Pisidia, and at Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe, three cities of Lycaonia
Paul - From Paphos "Paul and his company" set sail for the mainland, and arrived at Perga in Pamphylia