Places Study on Mysia

Places Study on Mysia

Acts 16: After they were come to Mysia, they assayed to go into Bithynia: but the Spirit suffered them not.
Acts 16: And they passing by Mysia came down to Troas.

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Morrish Bible Dictionary - Mysia
District in the N.W. of Asia Minor. Paul visited it, but 'passed by' and went to Troas. Acts 16:7,8 .

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Mysia
a country of Asia Minor, having the Propontis on the north, Bithynia on the north-east and east, Phrygia on the south-east, Lydia (from which it was separated by the river Hermus) on the south, the AEgean Sea on the west, and the narrow strait, called the Hellespont, on the north- west. Mysia was visited by St. Paul in his circuit through Asia Minor; but he was not suffered by the Spirit to remain there, being directed to pass over into Macedonia, Acts 16:7-10 . In this country stood the ancient city of Troy; as also that of Pergamus, one of the seven churches of Asia. Under the Romans it was made a province of the empire, and called Hellespontus; and its inhabitants are represented by Cicero as base and contemptible to a proverb.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mysia
(Μυσία)

Mysia was an ill-defined country in the N. W. of Asia Minor, having the aegean, the Hellespont, and the Propontis on the W. and N., Bithynia on the N. E., and the equally ill-defined regions of Phrygia and Mysia on the S. E. and S. The absence of landmarks between the land of the Mysians and that of the Phrygians gave rise to the saying, χωρὶς τὰ Μυσῶν καὶ Φρυγῶν ὁρίσματα. ‘The reason is this: strangers who came into the country were soldiers and barbarians; they had no fixed settlement in the country of which they obtained possession, but were, for the most part, wanderers, expelling others from their territory and being expelled themselves’ (Strabo, XII. iv. 4). For the most part a mountainous country, Mysia was not so productive as Lydia and Caria. It was sometimes regarded as including the Troad in the W., sometimes as separated therefrom by the river aesepus. The river Caicus and Mount Temnos were usually taken as the southern limits, and the district of Phrygia Epictetus, which extends a considerable distance eastward-as far as Dorylaeum and Nakoleia-was at one time in the hands of the Mysians. The Romans, who showed little regard for ethnical distinctions, absorbed Mysia in the great province of Asia.

Mysia is referred to in an important but difficult passage of Acts (Acts 16:7-8). St. Paul and Silas, having in the second missionary tour ‘come over against Mysia’ (ἐλθόντες κατὰ τὴν Μυσίαν), were restrained by the Spirit of Jesus from going into Bithynia; whereupon they turned westward, and ‘passing by Mysia (παρελθόντες τὴν Μυσίαν) they came down to Troas’ (Acts 16:7-8). For a discussion of the vexed question as to the apostles’ movements before they came to the borders of Bithynia and over against Mysia see Phrygia and Galatia. Assuming that St. Paul and Silas were travelling from Pisidian Antioch northward through Phrygian Asia, Ramsay observes that they would be ‘over against Mysia’ when they reached such a point that a line drawn across the country at right angles to the general line of their route would touch Mysia (The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. 75 n. [Note: . note.] ). This point would be the city of Dorylaeum. From there they turned due westward, and, ‘passing by,’ or neglecting, Mysia-this does not mean passing along its borders, but going straight through it without pausing to do any evangelistic work in it-they came down to the aegean. The other reading, διελθόντες, preferred by Blass despite its weak authority (D and Vulgate), seems in Acts and the Pauline Epistles invariably to designate a missionary tour, which is in this case out of the question, as the apostles have just been forbidden to preach in Asia (Acts 16:6). The distance from Dorylaeum to Troas is about 240 miles. The route would lead through the valley of the Rhyndacus and the town of Apameia, where there is a local tradition of a Pauline visit (Expository Times x. [1898-99] 495).

James Strahan.

Sentence search

Mysia - (Μυσία)... Mysia was an ill-defined country in the N. , and the equally ill-defined regions of Phrygia and Mysia on the S. The absence of landmarks between the land of the Mysians and that of the Phrygians gave rise to the saying, χωρὶς τὰ Μυσῶν καὶ Φρυγῶν ὁρίσματα. For the most part a mountainous country, Mysia was not so productive as Lydia and Caria. The river Caicus and Mount Temnos were usually taken as the southern limits, and the district of Phrygia Epictetus, which extends a considerable distance eastward-as far as Dorylaeum and Nakoleia-was at one time in the hands of the Mysians. The Romans, who showed little regard for ethnical distinctions, absorbed Mysia in the great province of Asia. ... Mysia is referred to in an important but difficult passage of Acts (Acts 16:7-8). Paul and Silas, having in the second missionary tour ‘come over against Mysia’ (ἐλθόντες κατὰ τὴν Μυσίαν), were restrained by the Spirit of Jesus from going into Bithynia; whereupon they turned westward, and ‘passing by Mysia (παρελθόντες τὴν Μυσίαν) they came down to Troas’ (Acts 16:7-8). For a discussion of the vexed question as to the apostles’ movements before they came to the borders of Bithynia and over against Mysia see Phrygia and Galatia. Paul and Silas were travelling from Pisidian Antioch northward through Phrygian Asia, Ramsay observes that they would be ‘over against Mysia’ when they reached such a point that a line drawn across the country at right angles to the general line of their route would touch Mysia (The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. From there they turned due westward, and, ‘passing by,’ or neglecting, Mysia-this does not mean passing along its borders, but going straight through it without pausing to do any evangelistic work in it-they came down to the aegean
Adramyttium - A maritime town of Mysia, in Asia Minor, opposite to the island of Lesbos, Acts 27:2
Pergamum - ” A wealthy ancient city in the district of Mysia in Asia Minor
Assos - A seaport in Mysia, opposite to the island of Lesbos on the north
Asia - The Asia spoken of in the Bible is Asia Minor, a peninsula which lies between the Euxine or Black sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean, and which formerly included the provinces of Phrygia, Cilicia, Pamphylia, Caria, Lycia, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Galatia, Lycaonia, and Pisidia. On the western coast were anciently the countries of Eolia, Ionia, and Doris, the names of which were afterwards retained, although the countries were included in the provinces of Mysia, Lydia, and Caria. Cicero speaks of proconsular Asia as containing the provinces of Phrygia, Mysia, Caria, and Lydia
as'Sos, - (approaching ), a seaport of the Roman province of Asia in the district anciently called Mysia, on the northern shore of the Gulf of Adrn-myttium, and about seven miles from Lesbos
Assos - A Greek city of Mysia in "Asia,"19 miles southeast of Troas, and on the Mediterranean Sea
Adramyttium - It lies in Mysia, Asia Minor, 39 35' N, 27 2' E
Epaenetus - "Asia" is used in the restricted sense, Mysia, Lydia, and Curia
Adramyttium - a city on the west coast of Mysia, in Lesser Asia, over against the isle of Lesbos
Adramyttium - A seaport town of Mysia: it was an Athenian colony, and is now but a village, retaining the name Edremid, with some trade
Adramyt'Tium - named form Adramys , brother of Croesus king of Lydia, a seaport in the province of Asia [ ASIA ], situated on a bay of the Aegean Sea, about 70 miles north of Smyrna, in the district anciently called Aeolis, and also Mysia
Assos - A sea-port town of Proconsular Asia, in the district of Mysia, on the north shore of the Gulf of Adramyttium
Assos - Seaport in Mysia, in the west of Asia Minor, on the north shore of the Gulf of Adramyttium 20 miles from Troas
Lyd'ia - (land of Lydus ), a maritime province in the west of Asia Minor bounded by Mysia on the north, Phrygia on the east, and Caria on the south
Lyd'ia - (land of Lydus ), a maritime province in the west of Asia Minor bounded by Mysia on the north, Phrygia on the east, and Caria on the south
Asia, Proconsular - A Roman province which embraced the western parts of the peninsula, Asia Minor, including Mysia, Lydia, Caria, and a great part of Phrygia; called proconsular to distinguish it from the continent of the same name
Troas - A city of Mysia on the N. He did not preach in Mysia on the first visit, though the Western text at Acts 16:5 makes him do so
Thyatira - A city of Asia Minor, on the borders of Lydia and Mysia
Adramyttium - A city of Asia Minor on the coast of Mysia, which in early times was called AEolis
Pergamos - Royal city of Mysia in Asia Minor: it was not visited by Paul as far as is recorded
Troas - Seaport town and district in Mysia, in the north-west of Asia Minor: it was visited by Paul on his journeys to and from Macedonia
Asia - of Asia Minor, with Ephesus as its capital, including Mysia, Lydia, Caria
Adramyttium - A seaport in Mysia (Acts 27:2)
Troas - a city of Phrygia, or of Mysia, upon the Hellespont, having the old city of Troy to the north, and that of Assos to the south
Bithynia - a country of Asia Minor, stretching along the shore of the Pontus Euxinus, or Black Sea, from Mysia to Paphlagonia; having Phrygia and Galatia on the south
Thyatira - It was situated on the confines of Lydia and Mysia, near the river Lycus, between Sardis and Pergamos
Pergamos - A city of Mysia, about three miles to the north of the river Caicus, and 20 miles from its present mouth
Assos - A town over half a mile from the Gulf of Adramyttium (in Mysia, province of Asia), in a splendid position on a hill about 770 feet high at its highest point
Stratonice, Martyr at Cyzicum - Stratonice, martyr at Cyzicum in Mysia with Seleucus her husband at the quinquennalia of Galerius during Diocletian's persecution
Pergamos - The chief city of Mysia, in Asia Minor
Troas - A city on the coast of Mysia, in the north-west of Asia Minor, named after ancient Troy, which was at some little distance from it (about 4 miles) to the north
Phrygia - ; Caria, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia were on its W
Bithynia - Paul and Silas from Mysia "assayed to go into Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus (so the Sin. , by the Propontis on the W, by Mysia, Phrygia, and Galatia on the S. The river Rhyndacus, and the snowy range of mount Olympus of Mysia, are marked features on the W
Asses - Seaport of Mysia, on the N
Troas - The city of Troas was situated close by the site of ancient Troy in the region once known as Mysia
Mysia - Mysia was visited by St
Gomer - the eldest son of Japheth, by whom a great part of Asia Minor was first peopled, and particularly that extensive tract which was called Phrygia, including the subdivisions of Mysia, Galatia, Bithynia, Lycaonia, &c
Bithynia - 1 Peter 1:1 , a providence in the northern part of Asia Minor, on the shore of the Black sea, having Paphlagonia on the east, Phrygia and Galatia on the south, and Mysia on the southwest
Tro'as, - Its situation was on the coast of Mysia, opposite the southeast extremity of the island of Tenedos
Asia - Its boundaries were often changed; but generally it may be said to have comprised Phrygia, Mysia, Lydia, and Caria, in Asia Minor, and thus it must be understood in Acts 6:9; Acts 19:10
Troas - A maritime city of Mysia, in the northwest part of Asia Minor, situated on the Egean coast, at some distance south of the supposed site of ancient Troy
Per'Gamos - (in Revised Version Pergamum ) ( height, elevation ), a city of Mysia, about 3 miles to the north of the river Caicus, and 20 miles from its present mouth
Asia - The province, with Ephesus as its capital, included Caria, Lydia, and Mysia, which were anciently called Doris, Ionia, and AEolis
Pergamos - Now Bergamo, a city of Mysia, in Asia Minor, and the residence of the Attalian princes
Asia - The following ethnic districts were in this province Mysia, Lydia, Western Phrygia, and Caria
Pergamus - After Philetaerus were five kings of the same race; the last of whom, Attalus Philopater, left his kingdom, which comprehended Mysia, AEolis, Ionia, Lydia, and Caria, to the Roman empire; to which it belonged when the first Christian church was established there
Adramyttium - -This flourishing seaport of Mysia was situated at the head of the Adramyttian Gulf, opposite the island of Lesbos, in the shelter of the southern side of Mt
Troas - " A city of Mysia, S
Thyati'ra, - a city on the Lycus, founded by Seleucus Nicator, lay to the left of the road from Pergamos to Sardis, 27 miles from the latter city, and on the very confines of Mysia and Ionia, so as to be sometimes reckoned within the one and sometimes within the other
Timothy - He was designated to the office of an evangelist (1 Timothy 4:14 ), and went with Paul in his journey through Phrygia, Galatia, and Mysia; also to Troas and Philippi and Berea (Acts 17:14 )
Phrygia - ] ‘and were forbidden’] of the Holy Ghost to speak the word in Asia; and when they were come over against Mysia they assayed to go into Bithynia; and the Spirit of Jesus suffered them not; and passing by Mysia they came down to Troas
Pergamos - A city of Mysia, three miles N
Thyatira - On the confines of Mysia and Ionia
Pergamum - PERGAMUM , or PERGAMUS , was an ancient city of Mysia, the seat of an independent kingdom from about b
Asia - Cicero indicates its extent in the words: ‘Namque, ut opinor, Asia vestra constat ex Phrygia, Caria, Mysia, Lydia’ (Flac
Philippi - The check to his zeal in being forbidden by the Spirit to enter Asia, Bithynia, and Mysia, and the miraculous call to Macedon, and his success in Philippi and the love of the converts, all endeared it to him
Philadelphia - Tmolus (Boz Dagh), where Lydia, Phrygia, and Mysia met
Galatians, Epistle to the - Luke sometimes uses popular non-political names like ‘Phrygia’ or ‘Mysia’ (Acts 2:10 ; Acts 16:3 ); but St. part of Asia Minor, including Mysia). Galatia to Bithynia could bring the travellers ‘over against Mysia’ ( Acts 16:7 )
Thyatira - ] )... Thyatira was a busy commercial city of northern Lydia, close to the southern border of Mysia
Peter, the Epistles of - Men of Cappadocia, as well as of "Pontus" and "Asia" (including Mysia, Lydia, Curia, Phrygia, Pisidia, and Lycaonia), were among Peter's hearers on Pentecost; these brought home to their native lands the first tidings of the gospel. In Mysia was Pergamos
Paul - Then, being on the borders of Mysia, they thought of going back to the northeast into Bithynia; but again the Spirit of Jesus "suffered them not," so they passed by Mysia and came down to Troas
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - ] The first overtures were made in 515 by the emperor Anastasius, being moved thereto by Vitalian, a Scythian, the commander of the imperial cavalry, who, having taken up the cause of orthodoxy, made himself master of Thrace, Scythia, and Mysia, and marched with an army of Huns and Bulgarians to the gates of Constantinople
Roads And Travel - There they were κατὰ Μυσίαν (opposite Mysia), and from there a road went N
Paul - They therefore went into Mysia; and, not being permitted by the Holy Ghost to go into Bithynia as they had intended, they went to Troas