Places Study on Michmash

Places Study on Michmash

1 Samuel 13: Saul chose him three thousand men of Israel; whereof two thousand were with Saul in Michmash and in mount Bethel, and a thousand were with Jonathan in Gibeah of Benjamin: and the rest of the people he sent every man to his tent.
1 Samuel 13: And the Philistines gathered themselves together to fight with Israel, thirty thousand chariots, and six thousand horsemen, and people as the sand which is on the sea shore in multitude: and they came up, and pitched in Michmash, eastward from Bethaven.
1 Samuel 13: And Samuel said, What hast thou done? And Saul said, Because I saw that the people were scattered from me, and that thou camest not within the days appointed, and that the Philistines gathered themselves together at Michmash;
1 Samuel 13: And Saul, and Jonathan his son, and the people that were present with them, abode in Gibeah of Benjamin: but the Philistines encamped in Michmash.
1 Samuel 13: And the garrison of the Philistines went out to the passage of Michmash.
1 Samuel 14: The forefront of the one was situate northward over against Michmash, and the other southward over against Gibeah.
1 Samuel 14: And they smote the Philistines that day from Michmash to Aijalon: and the people were very faint.
Nehemiah 11: The children also of Benjamin from Geba dwelt at Michmash, and Aija, and Bethel, and in their villages,
Isaiah 10: He is come to Aiath, he is passed to Migron; at Michmash he hath laid up his carriages:

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Michmash
Something hidden, a town of Benjamin (Ezra 2:27 ), east of Bethel and south of Migron, on the road to Jerusalem (Isaiah 10:28 ). It lay on the line of march of an invading army from the north, on the north side of the steep and precipitous Wady es-Suweinit ("valley of the little thorn-tree" or "the acacia"), and now bears the name of Mukhmas. This wady is called "the passage of Michmash" (1 Samuel 13:23 ). Immediately facing Mukhmas, on the opposite side of the ravine, is the modern representative of Geba, and behind this again are Ramah and Gibeah. This was the scene of a great battle fought between the army of Saul and the Philistines, who were utterly routed and pursued for some 16 miles towards Philistia as far as the valley of Aijalon. "The freedom of Benjamin secured at Michmash led through long years of conflict to the freedom of all its kindred tribes." The power of Benjamin and its king now steadily increased. A new spirit and a new hope were now at work in Israel. (See SAUL .)



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Michmash
1 Samuel 13-14. Now Mukhmas, a poor village of gray huts and ruins, seven miles N. of Jerusalem; on the northern edge of the wady Suweinit, the main pass between the central highlands where Michmash stands and the Jordan valley at Jericho. Opposite Michmash on the other side of the ravine was Geba (Jeba) where was the Philistine garrison, and behind this Gibeah. Jonathan smote the garrison or officer. (See JONATHAN.) The Philistines swarmed up from their seacoast plain, and occupied Michmash so that Saul had to retire to Gilgal near Jericho. Then followed Jonathan's bold enterprise, which issued in their rout, from Michmash, the farthest point E., to Ajalon on the W. The battle also passed over to Bethaven (Bethel) four miles N. of Michmash (1 Samuel 14:23.) Josephus (Ant. vi. 6, section 2) says that the part of Michmash held by them consisted of three summits, entrenched by a line of rocks, and ending in a long sharp precipice almost impregnable; here Jonathan and his armorbearer clambered up at their invitation.

Just as 1 Samuel 14:4 describes, there is what was once a sharp "toothlike rock" on one side of the gorge between the armies, answering to Bozez ("shining"), and another on the other answering to Seneh (thorn). The more timid of the Israelites emerged from the holes (which give Michmash its name ("hidden"); others derive it from Chemosh, marking a Moabite invasion at some time) to join in the pursuit. Sennacherib long after, advancing from the N., left his heavy baggage ("carriages") at Michmash, and crossing the pass lodged for the night at Geba (Isaiah 10:28-29). (See GEBA.) Kitchener suggests that Khirbet Haiy is the site of Ai. It is hardly one mile S.E. of Michmash on the old road from Jericho into the interior, and so the first stronghold Joshua would have to overcome. A plain to the N. was the battlefield; and there is room for ambush to hide without being seen by the men of Bethel. Michmash and Ai are closely connected. After the captivity 122 men of Michmash reoccupied their old dwelling (Ezra 2:27; Nehemiah 7:31). Here Jonathan Maccabeus had his seat of government (1 Maccabees 9:73). Eusebius and Jerome (Onomasticon) mention Michmash as near Ramah.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Michmash
(mik' mawssh) Place name meaning, “hidden place.” City in Benjamin about seven miles northeast of Jerusalem, four and a half miles northeast of Gibeah, rising 1980 feet above sea level overlooking a pass going from the Jordan River to Ephraim. It is four and a half miles southeast of Bethel, which rises 2,890 feet above sea level. It is modern Mukhmas. Michmash served as a staging area, first for Saul (1 Samuel 13:2 ) and then for the Philistine army as they prepared to fight. It lay on the standard invasion route from the north (Isaiah 10:28 ). The Philistines mustered 30,000 chariots and 6,000 horsemen there (1 Samuel 13:5-6 ). Before the battle could begin, Jonathan and his armor bearer sneaked into the Philistine camp, killed twenty sentries, and set off great confusion, resulting in the Philistines fighting each other (1 Samuel 14:20 ). Exiles returning from Babylon reinhabited the city (Nehemiah 11:31 ; compare Nehemiah 7:31 ). It served as Jonathan Maccabeus' residence and seat of government (1 Maccabees 9:73 ). See Jonathan ; Intertestamental History.



Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Michmash
MICHMASH. A place (not enumerated as a town) in the territory of Benjamin, and in the mountains of Bethel. It comes into prominence in connexion with the daring raid made by Jonathan and his armour-bearer upon the Philistines there encamped ( 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ). It was one of the smaller places to which the returning exiles belonged, contributing only 122 men to the enumeration of Ezra ( Ezra 2:27 ) and Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 7:31 ) [in both these last two passages Michmas ]. Nehemiah further alludes to it as a border city of Benjamin ( Nehemiah 11:31 ). Indications of its position may be obtained from the Jonathan story and also from Isaiah’s picture of the course of an Assyrian raid ( Isaiah 10:28 ). These indications permit an identification of the site with the modern village of Mukhmâs , situated in a wild and desolate region near the head of the Wady Kelt. In 1 Kings 4:9 for Makaz the LXX [Note: Septuagint.] erroneously reads Michmash . For a time it was the seat of the government of Jonathan Maccabæus ( 1Ma 9:73 ).

R. A. S. Macalister.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Michmash
A place about nine miles from Jerusalem. (1 Samuel 13:5) The name is supposed to be derived from Nacah, to strike.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Michmas, Michmash
City and mountain pass in the tribe of Benjamin. It was where Jonathan smote the garrison of the Philistines, when the victory might have been greater had not Saul distressed the people by his forbidding them to take food until the evening. Men of this town returned from the exile. 1 Samuel 13:2-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:5,31 ; Ezra 2:27 ; Nehemiah 7:31 ; Nehemiah 11:31 ; Isaiah 10:28 . Identified with Mukhmas, 31 53' N, 35 16' E . The Wady is in one place nearly half a mile wide, but elsewhere it is a deep gorge with nearly perpendicular rocks with caverns and fissures. In the winter a deep and rapid torrent rushes through it.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Michmash
A town of Benjamin, nine miles north by east of Jerusalem, Nehemiah 7:31 ; 11:31 . It was a strong position and lay on the north side of a deep valley; for which reasons perhaps Sennacherib, on his way to Jerusalem, left his heavy equipage there, Isaiah 10:28,29 . In this deep valley, a little west of the town, are two steep hills or rocks, supposed to be the ones referred to in the account of Jonathan's achievement at "the passage of Michmash," 1 Samuel 13:23 ; 14:4 . Dr. Robinson found here a village called Mukhmas, which appeared to be the remnant of a town of some size and importance.

Sentence search

Migron - The town of 1Samuel is generally located near Gibeah south of Michmash. The town of Isaiah 10:1 is generally located between Aiath (Ai) and Michmash, that is, to the north of Michmash
Seneh - ) The southern of the two isolated rocks in the passage of Michmash, mentioned in Jonathan's enterprise (1 Samuel 14:4; 1 Samuel 14:8), the nearer of the two to Geba. He made his way across from Geba of Benjamin to the Philistine garrison at Michmash over Seneh and Bozez, the rocks intervening. toward Michmash (Bozez). In going from Geba to Michmash, instead of going round by the passage of Michmash where the two valleys unite, Jonathan went directly across the ridge over the two rocks which lay between the passages or valleys
Bozez - A steep cliff on one side of the Michmash gorge opposite Seneh. of Michmash
Michmash - of Jerusalem; on the northern edge of the wady Suweinit, the main pass between the central highlands where Michmash stands and the Jordan valley at Jericho. Opposite Michmash on the other side of the ravine was Geba (Jeba) where was the Philistine garrison, and behind this Gibeah. ) The Philistines swarmed up from their seacoast plain, and occupied Michmash so that Saul had to retire to Gilgal near Jericho. Then followed Jonathan's bold enterprise, which issued in their rout, from Michmash, the farthest point E. of Michmash (1 Samuel 14:23. 6, section 2) says that the part of Michmash held by them consisted of three summits, entrenched by a line of rocks, and ending in a long sharp precipice almost impregnable; here Jonathan and his armorbearer clambered up at their invitation. The more timid of the Israelites emerged from the holes (which give Michmash its name ("hidden"); others derive it from Chemosh, marking a Moabite invasion at some time) to join in the pursuit. , left his heavy baggage ("carriages") at Michmash, and crossing the pass lodged for the night at Geba (Isaiah 10:28-29). of Michmash on the old road from Jericho into the interior, and so the first stronghold Joshua would have to overcome. Michmash and Ai are closely connected. After the captivity 122 men of Michmash reoccupied their old dwelling (Ezra 2:27; Nehemiah 7:31). Eusebius and Jerome (Onomasticon) mention Michmash as near Ramah
Mic Mash - (mihc' massh) NIV spelling of Michmash
Bozez - Rock near the ravine of Michmash
Macalon - The same as Michmash ; cf
Zeboim, Valley of - Place apparently in the vicinity of Michmash
a-i'ja, - like Aiath probably a variation of the name Ai, mentioned with Michmash and Bethel
Seneh - Rock in the "passage of Michmash" where the Philistines had a garrison in the days of Saul
Parah - Now the ruin Fârah , near the head of the Valley of Michmash
Migron - A town in the vicinity of Ai and Gibeah, north of Michmash, now lost, 1 Samuel 14:2 ; Isaiah 10:28
a-i'Ath - (feminine of Ai ), a place named by Isaiah, ( Isaiah 10:28 ) in connection with Migron and Michmash probably the same as Ai
se'Neh - (thorn ), the name of one of the two isolated rocks which stood in the "passage of Michmash," ( 1 Samuel 14:4 ) 6 1/2Miles north of Jerusalem
Migron - It was near Michmash
Seneh - ” A “cliff” (NIV) or “sharp column of rock” (REB) between Michmash and Geba (1 Samuel 14:4 )
Makaz - ] reading, Michmash , is impossible
Migron - Precipice or landslip, a place between Aiath and Michmash (Isaiah 10:28 )
Zeboim, Valley of - of Michmash) toward which the border looked, by way of which one company of Philistine marauders went. The path from Jericho to Mukhmas (Michmash) runs up a gorge called by an exactly equivalent name, Shuk ed Dubba, "ravine of the hyena" (1 Samuel 13:18)
Bozez - side "over against Michmash," "between the passages" whereby Jonathan entered the Philistines' garrison (1 Samuel 14:4-5)
Bozez - ” A sharp rock marking a passage in the wadi Suwenit near Michmash through which Jonathan and his armor-bearer went to fight the Philistines (1 Samuel 14:4 )
Michmas - Michmas (mĭkl'mas), or Michmash (mĭk'mash), something hidden. Michmash is identified with the modern village of Mukmas, about five miles north of Jerusalem, where are considerable ruins of columns, cisterns, etc
Seneh - The acacia; rock-thorn, the southern cliff in the Wady es-Suweinit, a valley south of Michmash, which Jonathan climbed with his armour-bearer (1 Samuel 14:4,5 )
Seneh - One of the steep cliffs forming the walls of the gorge of Michmash, where Jonathan’s exploit occurred ( 1 Samuel 14:4 f
Geba - and Michmash on the N. So in Isaiah 10:28-32, "he (Sennacherib) hath laid up his carriages at Michmash," i. heavy baggage) could not be got across the wady at Michmash
Ophrah - City in Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ), likely north of Michmash (1 Samuel 13:17-18 ). This site is likely et-Taiyibeh five miles north of Michmash and four miles northeast of Bethel
Zeboim - A valley and town of the Benjamites, east of Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:18 Nehemiah 11:34
Shual, the Land of - of Michmash
Beth-a'Ven - of idols ), a place on the mountains of Benjamin, east of Bethel, ( Joshua 7:2 ; 18:12 ) and lying between that place and Michmash
Shu'al, the Land of, - It is pretty certain from the passage that it lay north of Michmash
Zeboim - A valley in Benjamin between Michmash and the wilderness overlooking the Jordan River (1 Samuel 13:17-18 )
Migron - The direction of the march is from north to south: hence Migron ( Isaiah 10:28 ) lay north of Michmash (wh. of Makhmâs (Michmash)
Zebo'im - ... The valley of Zeboim, a ravine or gorge, apparently east of Michmash, mentioned only in (1 Samuel 13:18 ) The road running from Michmash to the east is specified as "the road of the border that looketh to the ravine of Zeboim toward the wilderness
Bethaven - of Bethel (Joshua 7:2; Joshua 18:12), between it and Michmash 1 Samuel 13:5; 1 Samuel 14:23)
Michmash - This wady is called "the passage of Michmash" (1 Samuel 13:23 ). "The freedom of Benjamin secured at Michmash led through long years of conflict to the freedom of all its kindred tribes
Michmash - Michmash. ] erroneously reads Michmash
Beth-Aven - Close to Ai ( Joshua 7:2 ), by the wilderness ( Joshua 18:12 ), north-west of Michmash ( 1 Samuel 13:5 ), and on the way to Aijalon ( 1 Samuel 14:23 ), still inhabited in the 8th cent
Geba - It was six or seven miles from Jerusalem, and was separated from Michmash on the north by a deep valley
Beth Dagon - of the Jordan from Michmash on the S
Socho - A fence; hedge, (1 Chronicles 4:18 ; RSV, Soco)=So'choh (1 Kings 4:10 ; RSV, Socoh), Sho'choh (1 Samuel 17:1 ; RSV, Socoh), Sho'co (2 Chronicles 11:7 ; RSV, Soco), Sho'cho (2 Chronicles 28:18 ; RSV, Soco), a city in the plain or lowland of Judah, where the Philistines encamped when they invaded Judah after their defeat at Michmash
Michmash - In this deep valley, a little west of the town, are two steep hills or rocks, supposed to be the ones referred to in the account of Jonathan's achievement at "the passage of Michmash," 1 Samuel 13:23 ; 14:4
Geba - Geba was near Michmash and on the south side of the ravine
ge'ba - It is now the modern village of Jeba , which stands picturesquely on the top of its steep terraced hill, six miles north of Jerusalem, on the very edge of the great Wady Suweinit , looking northward to the opposite village of ancient Michmash, which also retains its old name of Mukhmas
Ophrah - A town in Benjamin ( Joshua 18:23 ) which was somewhere near Michmash, and is only once elsewhere referred to, as an indication of the direction of a Philistine raid ( 1 Samuel 13:17 )
Geba - Some citizens of Geba lived in Michmash and other cities in Nehemiah's day, unless the Hebrew text is read differently (REB) to mean they lived in Geba as well as the other towns (Nehemiah 11:31 ). ... Geba is variously located, some scholars going so far as to locate a southern Geba of Benjamin at Jeba across the wadi Suweinit from Michmash, about five and a half miles north of Jerusalem, and a northern Geba (Joshua 18:24 ) at khirbet et-Tell, seven miles north of Bethel
Beth-Aven - It formed a border of Benjamin (Joshua 18:12 ) and was west of Michmash (1 Samuel 13:5 )
Michmash - Michmash served as a staging area, first for Saul (1 Samuel 13:2 ) and then for the Philistine army as they prepared to fight
Vale - of Mukhmas (Michmash), which the survey of the Palestine Exploration Fund favors. 'the precipice'), Michmash
Gibeah - Saul was in their front at Michmash, holding also mount Bethel on the N. ... Jonathan smote the garrison at Geba, and the Philistines in consequence gathering a vast host drove Saul's little army before them out of Bethel and Michmash down the eastern passes to Gilgal near Jericho, in the Jordan valley; took Michmash, Saul's former quarters, and sent out plunderers N
Jonathan - The narrative of his brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-14:52 , illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, (see also 1 Samuel 13:3 ) and the favor borne him by the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death in consequence of Saul's foolish vow
Gibeah - Robinson found traces of Gebeah in the small and ruinous village of Jeba, near Ramah, separated from Michmash on the north by a deep valley, and about six miles north by east from Jerusalem
Jonathan - His brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-23; 1 Samuel 14:1-52, illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, see also 1 Samuel 13:3, when he was about 30 years old, and his favor with the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death for violating Saul's foolish vow
Geba - of the great Wâdy Suweinît , over against Michmash, the modern Mukhmâs
Saul - Saul, with 2,000 men, occupied Michmash and Mount Bethel; while his son Jonathan, with 1,000 men, occupied Gibeah, to the south of Geba, and seemingly without any direction from his father "smote" the Philistines in Geba. Thus roused, the Philistines, who gathered an army of 30,000 chariots and 6,000 horsemen, and "people as the sand which is on the sea-shore in multitude," encamped in Michmash, which Saul had evacuated for Gilgal. ... When Saul, after Samuel's departure, went out from Gilgal with his 600 men, his followers having decreased to that number (13:15), against the Philistines at Michmash (q. ), he had his head-quarters under a pomegrante tree at Migron, over against Michmash, the Wady esSuweinit alone intervening. Saul and his 600 men, a band which speedily increased to 10,000, perceiving the confusion, pursued the army of the Philistines, and the tide of battle rolled on as far as to Bethaven, halfway between Michmash and Bethel. " But though faint and weary, the Israelites "smote the Philistines that day from Michmash to Aijalon" (a distance of from 15 to 20 miles)
Bethel -
A place in Central Palestine, about 10 miles north of Jerusalem, at the head of the pass of Michmash and Ai
Caves - Michmash, the scene of Jonathan's enterprise, implies the same
Jonathan - Then Jonathan took only his armor-bearer to the rocky crags at Michmash and brought panic to the Philistines by killing twenty of them (1 Samuel 14:1-16 )
Jonathan - The Philistine army gathered together and encamped in Michmash
Benjamin - The hilly nature of the country is marked by the names Gibeon, Gibeah, Geba, Ramah, Mizpeh (watchtower), "the ascent of Bethhoron," the cliff Rimmon, the pass of Michmash. " Up these western passes the Philistines advanced against Saul in the beginning of his reign, and drove him to Gilgal in the Arabah, occupying from Michmash to Ajalon
Saul - Saul and Jonathan , his son, were encamped in Michmash and Gibeah (Geba), when Jonathan smote the ‘garrison’ (?) of the Philistines in Geba, thus precipitating the struggle
Philistia - (See JONATHAN; DAVID; ISRAEL; Michmash
Jonathan - " Having fixed on an omen from God of success, they received it in the scoffing invitation of the Philistine guards on the other side of the steep Michmash defile, the key to command the E
Saul - " The Gilgal meant is that in the Jordan valley, to which Saul withdrew in order to gather soldiers for battle, and offer sacrifices, and then advance again to Gibeah and Geba, thence to encounter the Philistines encamped at Michmash
Maccabees - The land, however, was not at peace, and in the interests of order Bacchides gave Jonathan the right to maintain an armed force at Michmash
Palestine - ... By this Joshua drove the Canaanites to the plains; the Philistines went up to Michmash, and fled back past Ajalon