Places Study on Mesha

Places Study on Mesha

Genesis 10: And their dwelling was from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the east.
2 Kings 3: And Mesha king of Moab was a sheepmaster, and rendered unto the king of Israel an hundred thousand lambs, and an hundred thousand rams, with the wool.
1 Chronicles 2: Now the sons of Caleb the brother of Jerahmeel were, Mesha his firstborn, which was the father of Ziph; and the sons of Mareshah the father of Hebron.
1 Chronicles 8: And he begat of Hodesh his wife, Jobab, and Zibia, and Mesha, and Malcham,
Daniel 1: Unto whom the prince of the eunuchs gave names: for he gave unto Daniel the name of Belteshazzar; and to Hananiah, of Shadrach; and to Mishael, of Meshach; and to Azariah, of Abednego.
Daniel 2: Then Daniel requested of the king, and he set Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, over the affairs of the province of Babylon: but Daniel sat in the gate of the king.
Daniel 3: There are certain Jews whom thou hast set over the affairs of the province of Babylon, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; these men, O king, have not regarded thee: they serve not thy gods, nor worship the golden image which thou hast set up.
Daniel 3: Then Nebuchadnezzar in his rage and fury commanded to bring Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Then they brought these men before the king.
Daniel 3: Nebuchadnezzar spake and said unto them, Is it true, O Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, do not ye serve my gods, nor worship the golden image which I have set up?
Daniel 3: Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, answered and said to the king, O Nebuchadnezzar, we are not careful to answer thee in this matter.
Daniel 3: Then was Nebuchadnezzar full of fury, and the form of his visage was changed against Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego: therefore he spake, and commanded that they should heat the furnace one seven times more than it was wont to be heated.
Daniel 3: And he commanded the most mighty men that were in his army to bind Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, and to cast them into the burning fiery furnace.
Daniel 3: Therefore because the king's commandment was urgent, and the furnace exceeding hot, the flame of the fire slew those men that took up Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.
Daniel 3: And these three men, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, fell down bound into the midst of the burning fiery furnace.
Daniel 3: Then Nebuchadnezzar came near to the mouth of the burning fiery furnace, and spake, and said, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, ye servants of the most high God, come forth, and come hither. Then Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, came forth of the midst of the fire.
Daniel 3: Then Nebuchadnezzar spake, and said, Blessed be the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, who hath sent his angel, and delivered his servants that trusted in him, and have changed the king's word, and yielded their bodies, that they might not serve nor worship any god, except their own God.
Daniel 3: Therefore I make a decree, That every people, nation, and language, which speak any thing amiss against the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, shall be cut in pieces, and their houses shall be made a dunghill: because there is no other God that can deliver after this sort.
Daniel 3: Then the king promoted Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, in the province of Babylon.

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Mesha
Middle district, Vulgate, Messa.
A plain in that part of the boundaries of Arabia inhabited by the descendants of Joktan (Genesis 10:30 ).



Heb. meysh'a, "deliverance," the eldest son of Caleb (1 Chronicles 2:42 ), and brother of Jerahmeel.



Heb. id, a king of Moab, the son of Chemosh-Gad, a man of great wealth in flocks and herds (2 Kings 3:4 ). After the death of Ahab at Ramoth-Gilead, Mesha shook off the yoke of Israel; but on the ascension of Jehoram to the throne of Israel, that king sought the help of Jehoshaphat in an attempt to reduce the Moabites again to their former condition. The united armies of the two kings came unexpectedly on the army of the Moabites, and gained over them an easy victory. The whole land was devastated by the conquering armies, and Mesha sought refuge in his last stronghold, Kir-harasheth (q.v.). Reduced to despair, he ascended the wall of the city, and there, in the sight of the allied armies, offered his first-born son a sacrifice to Chemosh, the fire-god of the Moabites. This fearful spectacle filled the beholders with horror, and they retired from before the besieged city, and recrossed the Jordan laden with spoil (2 Kings 3:25-27 ). The exploits of Mesha are recorded in the Phoenician inscription on a block of black basalt found at Dibon, in Moab, usually called the "Moabite stone" (q.v.).




Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Mesha
1. King of Moab. (See DIBON on his victorious campaign against Israel, and confirmation of Scripture.) Revolted at Ahab's death (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 3:4-5). Being "sheepmasters" the Moabites had rendered tribute to Israel ever since David's days (2 Samuel 8:2) in flocks, 100,000 lambs, and 100,000 rams with the wool. Isaiah (Isaiah 16:1) counsels Moab to resume payment, "send the lamb to the ruler ... from Sela unto ... Zion." (See JEHORAM, JEHOSHAPHAT, ELISHA, ENGEDI, CHEMOSH, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land.)

2. Firstborn of Jerahmeel's brother Caleb; father, i.e. founder, of Ziph (1 Chronicles 2:42).

3. A descendant of Benjamin, born in Moab, son of Shaharaim and Hodesh (1 Chronicles 8:8-9). 1 Chronicles 8:4. Joktan's descendants "dwelt from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the East." The western port of Arabia; Muss (Bothart), Mesene ("a fluviatile island") at the mouth of the Tigris and Euphrates, near Bassora (Gesenius) (Genesis 10:30); Beishe in the N. of Yemen (Knobel).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Mesha
(mee' sshuh) English translation of three Hebrew names. 1. Personal name meaning “Safety.” Ruler of Moab who led a rebellion against Israel (2 Kings 3:4-27 ). The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief. The date of his revolt is uncertain. 2 Kings 1:1 suggests the revolt followed immediately on Ahab's death (850 B.C.). 2 Kings 3:4 sets the revolt in the reign of Jehoram (849-842 B.C.). The Moabite stone erected by Mesha to celebrate his exploits contains two apparently irreconcilable time notes: in the middle of the reign of Omri's son and forty years after the beginning of Omri's oppressive taxation of Moab. If Omri's son is taken literally, the Moabite stone places the revolt in the reign of Ahab (869-850 B.C.). “Son of Omri” was, however, used as a title for any of the kings who succeeded Omri as king in Samaria, even of Jehu who overthrew Omri's dynasty. Jehoram, Omri's grandson, might thus be the “son” of Omri of the Moabite stone. Jehoram's reign, however, ended five years before the fortieth anniversary of the earliest date of Omri's oppression of Moab. At the beginning of the revolt, Mesha succeeded in seizing Israelite border towns and in fortifying towns on his frontier. An alliance of Israel, Judah, and Edom, however, outflanked his defenses and attacked Mesha from the rear. Mesha retreated to Kir-hareseth from which he attempted, unsuccessfully, to escape to his Aramean allies. With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls. In response, the Israelites lifted their seige and returned home. The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of cities and highways. Archaeological evidence, however, suggests a decline in Moabite civilization following the revolt. See Moab.

2. Descendant of Benjamin living in Moab (1 Chronicles 8:9 ). 3 . Descendant of Caleb (1 Chronicles 2:42 ; RSV follows early Greek translation in reading Mareshah). 4. Place name meaning, “debt.” City in the territory of the Joktanites (Genesis 10:30 ), most likely to be identified with Massa (Genesis 25:14 ; Proverbs 31:1 ), located between the head of the gulf of Aqaba and the Persian Gulf. This Massa is identified with the Assyrian Mash and the Persian Maciya .

Chris Church



People's Dictionary of the Bible - Mesha
Mesha (mç'shah), deliverance. 1. A king of Moab who refused to pay tribute to Jehoram, king of Israel. Jehoram determined to punish him; but Mesha made the horrible sacrifice of his eldest son to some idol god, openly upon the wall, in sight of the Israelites, who fearing that they might incur the anger of God by having given occasion to a human sacrifice, retreated to their own country. 2 Kings 3:4-27. A most wonderful corroboration of the Scripture history is found In the famous Moabite stone. See Moab. 2. A son of Caleb, and brother of Mareshah. 1 Chronicles 2:42. S. A Benjamite, son of Shaharaim. 1 Chronicles 8:9.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Mesha
MESHA. 1. Son of Shaharaim, a Benjamite ( 1 Chronicles 8:2 ). 2. Firstborn of Caleb ( 1 Chronicles 2:42 ).

MESHA. A king of Moab in the 9th cent. b.c. According to an inscription (on the ‘ Moabite Stone ’ discovered at Dibon in 1868) describing his deeds, he expelled the Israelitish inhabitants from northern Moab, or from a portion of the debatable land between the two monarchies east of the northern third of the Dead Sea. Under Omri, the builder of Samaria, the border of Israel had been extended southwards to near its ancient limits ( Numbers 21:24 ff.); and Mesha reclaimed it by vindictive warfare, from Kiriathaim as far as Nebo. 2 Kings 3:1-27 also deals with the relation between northern Israel and Mesha, and it is difficult to reconcile the two accounts in every detail. The matter can best be dealt with here by giving the most probable order of the events: (1) the conquest by Omri [Inscription, lines 4, 5] about b.c. 880; (2) the expulsion of the Hebrews by Mesha in the time of Ahab [Inscr. 1. 8 ff.] about b.c. 855, Mesha’s ‘forty years’ being, as also often in Hebrew narrative, a round number; (3) the refusal of Mesha to again submit, which is all that the Hebrew of 2 Kings 1:1 ; 2 Kings 3:5 (EV [Note: English Version.] ‘rebelled’) necessarily implies; (4) the unsuccessful expedition by Joram and his allies to reduce Mesha to submission, recorded in 2 Kings 3:6-27 .

J. F. M‘Curdy.

MESHA is mentioned as marking one of the boundaries of the territory ascribed to the descendants of Joktan in Genesis 10:25 . Its position has not yet been satisfactorily identified. The proposed identification with the late territory of Mesene at the head of the Persian Gulf is improbable. A better case can be made out for identifying it with Mash or Mashu, a general term in the Assyrian inscriptions for the Syro-Arabian desert; though the passage suggests that a single place, or tribe, rather than so vast a region, is referred to. If the vowel points be emended the word may be read as Massa , the name of a son of Ishmael in Genesis 25:14 and 1 Chronicles 1:30 . Traces of this latter tribe have been sought in place names in central Arabia, but no identification yet suggested can be regarded as certain.

L. W. King.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Mesha
Burden; salvation
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mesha
King of Moab, 2 Kings 3:4. The name hath been thought to signify burden.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Mesha
1. One of the limits of the Joktanites, Genesis 10:30 ; probably in the S.E. Perhaps Musa on the Red Sea.

2. King of Moab, described as a sheep-master: a pastoral prince rich in flocks and herds. He was tributary to Ahab, but rebelled and suffered an entire defeat from Jehoram, Jehoshaphat, and the king of Edom. With 700 men he endeavoured to break through the allied forces but failed. In desperation he offered his eldest son as a sacrifice on the wall. 2 Kings 3:4-27 .

3. Eldest son of Caleb the brother of Jerahmeel. 1 Chronicles 2:42 .

4. Son of Shaharaim, a Benjamite. 1 Chronicles 8:9 .

Holman Bible Dictionary - Mesha
(mee' sshuh) English translation of three Hebrew names. 1. Personal name meaning “Safety.” Ruler of Moab who led a rebellion against Israel (2 Kings 3:4-27 ). The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief. The date of his revolt is uncertain. 2 Kings 1:1 suggests the revolt followed immediately on Ahab's death (850 B.C.). 2 Kings 3:4 sets the revolt in the reign of Jehoram (849-842 B.C.). The Moabite stone erected by Mesha to celebrate his exploits contains two apparently irreconcilable time notes: in the middle of the reign of Omri's son and forty years after the beginning of Omri's oppressive taxation of Moab. If Omri's son is taken literally, the Moabite stone places the revolt in the reign of Ahab (869-850 B.C.). “Son of Omri” was, however, used as a title for any of the kings who succeeded Omri as king in Samaria, even of Jehu who overthrew Omri's dynasty. Jehoram, Omri's grandson, might thus be the “son” of Omri of the Moabite stone. Jehoram's reign, however, ended five years before the fortieth anniversary of the earliest date of Omri's oppression of Moab. At the beginning of the revolt, Mesha succeeded in seizing Israelite border towns and in fortifying towns on his frontier. An alliance of Israel, Judah, and Edom, however, outflanked his defenses and attacked Mesha from the rear. Mesha retreated to Kir-hareseth from which he attempted, unsuccessfully, to escape to his Aramean allies. With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls. In response, the Israelites lifted their seige and returned home. The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of cities and highways. Archaeological evidence, however, suggests a decline in Moabite civilization following the revolt. See Moab.

2. Descendant of Benjamin living in Moab (1 Chronicles 8:9 ). 3 . Descendant of Caleb (1 Chronicles 2:42 ; RSV follows early Greek translation in reading Mareshah). 4. Place name meaning, “debt.” City in the territory of the Joktanites (Genesis 10:30 ), most likely to be identified with Massa (Genesis 25:14 ; Proverbs 31:1 ), located between the head of the gulf of Aqaba and the Persian Gulf. This Massa is identified with the Assyrian Mash and the Persian Maciya .

Chris Church



American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Mesha
1. A place on the eastern frontier of the territory of Joktan, Genesis 10:30 , supposed to have been in the region of Bassora, at the northwest end of the Persian Gulf.

2. A king of Moab, who paid an enormous tribute to Ahab king of Israel, but revolted at his death, 2 Kings 1:1 ; 3:4-27 . Joram the son of Ahab, with the aid of Judah and Edom, made war upon him, and besieged him in his capital. Unable to force his way through the besieging host, King Mesha sought the aid of his gods by sacrificing his own son on the city wall; and the besiegers, horrorstruck at this atrocious act, withdrew in terror, lest some curse should fall on them.

Sentence search

Mesha - Mesha. ... Mesha. ); and Mesha reclaimed it by vindictive warfare, from Kiriathaim as far as Nebo. 2 Kings 3:1-27 also deals with the relation between northern Israel and Mesha, and it is difficult to reconcile the two accounts in every detail. 880; (2) the expulsion of the Hebrews by Mesha in the time of Ahab [Inscr. 855, Mesha’s ‘forty years’ being, as also often in Hebrew narrative, a round number; (3) the refusal of Mesha to again submit, which is all that the Hebrew of 2 Kings 1:1 ; 2 Kings 3:5 (EV [Note: English Version. ] ‘rebelled’) necessarily implies; (4) the unsuccessful expedition by Joram and his allies to reduce Mesha to submission, recorded in 2 Kings 3:6-27 . ... Mesha is mentioned as marking one of the boundaries of the territory ascribed to the descendants of Joktan in Genesis 10:25
Mesha - The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief. The Moabite stone erected by Mesha to celebrate his exploits contains two apparently irreconcilable time notes: in the middle of the reign of Omri's son and forty years after the beginning of Omri's oppressive taxation of Moab. At the beginning of the revolt, Mesha succeeded in seizing Israelite border towns and in fortifying towns on his frontier. An alliance of Israel, Judah, and Edom, however, outflanked his defenses and attacked Mesha from the rear. Mesha retreated to Kir-hareseth from which he attempted, unsuccessfully, to escape to his Aramean allies. With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls. The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of cities and highways
Mesha - The designation of Mesha as a sheep breeder (2 Kings 3:4 NRSV) is perhaps an honorary title for chief. The Moabite stone erected by Mesha to celebrate his exploits contains two apparently irreconcilable time notes: in the middle of the reign of Omri's son and forty years after the beginning of Omri's oppressive taxation of Moab. At the beginning of the revolt, Mesha succeeded in seizing Israelite border towns and in fortifying towns on his frontier. An alliance of Israel, Judah, and Edom, however, outflanked his defenses and attacked Mesha from the rear. Mesha retreated to Kir-hareseth from which he attempted, unsuccessfully, to escape to his Aramean allies. With no escape possible, Mesha sacrificed his firstborn son to his god Chemosh on the city walls. The Moabite stone describes Mesha as a builder of cities and highways
Horonaim - The name of Horonaim is found on the Moabite stone: it was taken by King Mesha
Kir-Hareseth - ... During the reign of Jehoram of Israel, Mesha, king of Moab, rebelled against Israel (2 Kings 3:4-27 ). The forces allied against Mesha crushed the rebellion, but they were unsuccessful in capturing Mesha. After Mesha tried unsuccessfully to break through the besiegers, he offered his son as a sacrifice upon the city walls. As a result, “there came a great wrath upon Israel” (2 Kings 3:27 NRSV); and the allied forces withdrew, leaving Mesha alive in Kir-Hareseth ( 2 Kings 3:4-27 )
Moabite Stone - A basalt stone, bearing an inscription by King Mesha, which was discovered at Dibon by Klein, a German missionary at Jerusalem, in 1868. It was set up by Mesha as a record and memorial of his victories. It records (1) Mesha's wars with Omri, (2) his public buildings, and (3) his wars against Horonaim. This inscription in a remarkable degree supplements and corroborates the history of King Mesha recorded in 2 Kings 3:4-27 . ... This ancient monument, recording the heroic struggles of King Mesha with Omri and Ahab, was erected about B
Jahaz - On the Moabite stone, King Mesha of Moab claims an Israelite king (perhaps Jehu) built Jahaz and used it as a base in his unsuccessful fight against Mesha, Chemosh, the Moabite god driving the Israelites out. Mesha then annexed the city to Dibon
Baal Meon - The famous Moabite stone of Dibon mentions that as Omri made Medeba a military center for opposing Moab, so Mesha occupied Baal Meon as his center for assailing Israel; "I Mesha, son of Kamos (Chemosh), fortified Baal Meon, and I besieged and took Kiriathaim and Nebo," etc
Mesha - Mesha (mç'shah), deliverance. Jehoram determined to punish him; but Mesha made the horrible sacrifice of his eldest son to some idol god, openly upon the wall, in sight of the Israelites, who fearing that they might incur the anger of God by having given occasion to a human sacrifice, retreated to their own country
Joktan - See Mesha ; Sephar
Sharon, Plain of - Area of uncertain location east of the Jordan inhabited by the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:16 ) and mentioned by King Mesha of Moab. See Mesha
Almon-Diblathaim - of the Arnon) and the Abarim range (Numbers 33:46-47); probably the same as Beth-Diblathaim of Moab (Jeremiah 48:22), which Mesha mentions in the famous Moabite stone as "built" by him and colonized with Moabites
Beth-Diblathaim - , Mesha, king of Moab, bragged that he built the city, as recorded on the Moabite Stone
Mesha - After the death of Ahab at Ramoth-Gilead, Mesha shook off the yoke of Israel; but on the ascension of Jehoram to the throne of Israel, that king sought the help of Jehoshaphat in an attempt to reduce the Moabites again to their former condition. The whole land was devastated by the conquering armies, and Mesha sought refuge in his last stronghold, Kir-harasheth (q. The exploits of Mesha are recorded in the Phoenician inscription on a block of black basalt found at Dibon, in Moab, usually called the "Moabite stone" (q
Bezer - Mesha, king of Moab about 830 B
Kir-Haraseth - After the death of Ahab, Mesha, king of Moab (see 2 Kings 3:20-27 )
Bamoth-Baal - ” Mesha, king of Moab about 830 B
Moabite Stone - It records the victories of Mesha, king of Moab, esp
Chemosh - ), Mesha (2 Kings 3:5 ) ascribes his victories over the king of Israel to this god, "And Chemosh drove him before my sight
Moab And the Moabite Stone - Moab's agricultural productivity is illustrated by the biblical passages pertaining to Ruth and King Mesha, surely the two best-known Moabites from the Bible. King Mesha, we are told, “was a sheep breeder; and he had to deliver annually to the king of Israel a hundred thousand lambs, and the wool of a hundred thousand rams” (2 Kings 3:4 RSV). The siege was lifted when King Mesha of Moab sacrificed his oldest son on the city wall. This stone, which bears an inscription from the reign of the same King Mesha mentioned in 2 Kings 3:1 , was discovered in 1868, near the ruins of ancient Dibon, by a German missionary. Known also as The Mesha Inscription, the monument reports the major accomplishments of King Mesha's reign. , the time of the Omri dynasty of Israel and King Mesha of Moab (1Kings 16:15–2 Kings 10:18 ). King Mesha ascended the throne of Moab approximately midway during Ahab's reign, however, and eventually succeeded in throwing off the Israelite yoke. Mesha apparently began the struggle for Moabite independence during the turbulent years following Ahab's death (2 Kings 1:1 ). Ahaziah, who succeeded Ahab to the throne of Israel, was unable to respond to Mesha's challenge because of an accident which led to his premature death (2 Kings 1:1 ). Later, when Jehoram followed Ahaziah to the throne of Israel and attempted to restore Israelite control over Mesha, he was unsuccessful (2 Kings 3:1 ). See Kir-hareseth ; Arnon River; Transjordan ; King Mesha; Ruth ; Jehoram (of Israel); Jehoshaphat
Mesha - " (See JEHORAM, JEHOSHAPHAT, ELISHA, ENGEDI, CHEMOSH, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land. Joktan's descendants "dwelt from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the East
Nebo - It was held by Israel until recaptured by King Mesha about 850 B. David recaptured the area (2 Samuel 8:2 ), and it remained a part of Israel until Mesha rebelled and took control about 850 B
se'Phar - It is written after the enumeration of the sons of Joktan, "And their dwelling was from Mesha as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the east
Jogbehah - Chemosh Gad ("he whose good fortune is Chemosh") the father of Mesha was a Dibonite
Ziph - Son of Mesha, a son of Caleb
Baal-Meon - Mesha, king of Moab about 830 B
Ataroth - Mesha, king of Moab, about 830 B
Dibon - Klein, of the Church Missionary Society, in traveling from Es-Salt to Kerak was informed by a sheikh of the Beni Hamide of the now well-known basalt stone of Dibon, with its remarkable inscription by King Mesha. The first part (lines 1-21) records Mesha's wars with Omri, king of Israel (i. In Isaiah 15:2 Dibon is termed a "high place"; Mesha on the stone terms it his birthplace, and chose it as the site of his monument. The phrase of "Mesha" (named on the stone just as we read it 2 Kings 3:4-27), "Chemosh let me see my desire upon all my enemies," is word for word, substituting Jehovah for the idol of apostate Moab, David's phrase (Psalms 59:10). The revolt of Mesha (recorded on the stone) from Judah, to which he had paid a tribute of 100,000 lambs and 100,000 rams (2 Kings 3:4; Isaiah 16:1), was probably in Ahaziah's reign, who died 896 B. Mesha's words on the stone imply that he had more than Israel alone to contend with: "he let me see my desire upon all my enemies" (line 4). A confirmation of the Scripture account of Mesha's defeat by the three confederates appears in the Black Obelisk from Nimrud, of the same age as the Moabite stone. of Moab is probably accounted for by the fact recorded on the Moabite stone; Mesha was carrying all before him in the W. The stone notices expressly Israel's oppression of Moab in the reign of "Omri king of Israel and his son (and 'his son's son' is to be supplied in one gap of the inscription) forty years," and Mesha's breaking off the yoke; after which it says "all Dibon was loyal"; whereas previously "the men of Gad dwelt in the land of Ataroth" (compare Numbers 32:84-88), and "the king of Israel fortified" it. There we read "Israel departed from the Moabite king, and returned to their own land;" ultimately, the Dibon stone informs us Mesha took town after town of Gad, "Medeba, Jahaz, Dibon, and Kir. From the time of Mesha, Israel was from time to time subjected to Moabite invasions (2 Chronicles 20:1; 2 Kings 13:20). ... Mesha, according to the Dibon stone, "built (i. Mesha says in the inscription on the basalt stone, "I made this high place a stone of salvation;" compare Ebenezer, "the stone of help," 1 Samuel 7:12 margin See "The Moabite Stone," by W
Omri - In the stele of Mesha (the "Moabite stone"), which was erected in Moab about twenty or thirty years after Omri's death, it is recorded that Omri oppressed Moab till Mesha delivered the land: "Omri, king of Israel, oppressed Moab many days, for Chemosh was angry with his land
Dibon - The Moabite stone of King Mesha, discovered in Dibon, shows that Moab controlled Dibon about 850 B. , climaxing about 850 with Mesha
me'Sha - (Genesis 10:30 ) ... The king of Moab who was tributary to Ahab, (2 Kings 3:4 ) but when Ahab fell at Ramoth-gilead, Mesha refused to pay tribute to his successor, Jehoram. (At Dibon in Moab has lately been discovered the famous Moabite Stone, which contains inscriptions concerning King Mesha and his wars, and which confirms the Bible account
Mesha - Unable to force his way through the besieging host, King Mesha sought the aid of his gods by sacrificing his own son on the city wall; and the besiegers, horrorstruck at this atrocious act, withdrew in terror, lest some curse should fall on them
Bajith - In the Moabite stone of Dibon there is inscribed: "I Mesha, son of Chemosh god, built Beth Bamoth, for it was destroyed, and Beth Diblathaim, and Beth Baal Meon
Bezer - It is mentioned also by Mesha’ (Moab
Massa - Mesha, p
Joktan - Arabia, "from Mesha unto Sephar a mount of the East" (Zafari, a seaport E
Medeba - Mesha King of Moab retook the city during the reign of Omri's son
Omri - In the black obelisk even Jehu as king of Israel is called "son of Omri" In the Dibon stone Mesha records that Omri subjected and oppressed Moab until Mesha delivered his country
Bamoth-Baal - Mesha says, on the stone, he rebuilt Beth Bamoth, it having been probably destroyed in the struggles between Moab and Reuben or Gad
Siloam, Tower of - It appears that at some remote period a colony from the capital of king Mesha (Dibon-Moab) crossed the Jordan and fixed itself at the gates of Jerusalem at Silwan
Arnon - Mesha made the ‘high way in Arnon,’ and built (possibly ‘fortified’) Aroer (Moabite Stone)
Jahaz - According to the Moabite Stone (11:18 20), the king of Israel dwelt at Jahaz while at war with king Mesha, but was driven out, and the town was taken and added to Moabite territory
Moab, Moabites - ... It is dedicated to Chemosh, the god of Moab, by Mesha. There can be no doubt that the Mesha of the stone is the same as the Mesha, of scripture. Ahaziah succeeded Ahab, but it was not he that attacked Moab: his reign (called two years) and the beginning of the reign of Jehoram, would give Mesha time to strengthen himself against Israel and attack some of the outlying cities
Ariel - " Ganneau has deciphered on the Moabite stone that the Ariel of David is mentioned as taken by Mesha, the Moabite king, at Ataroth, and dragged before the face of Chemosh at Kerioth
Chemosh - The inscribed black stone set up at Dibon, lately discovered, is full of the Moabite king Mesha's praises of Chemosh as the giver of his martial successes against Israel. Chemosh required human sacrifices as god of war; Mesha, after taking Ataroth, offered all the warriors in sacrifice
Jehoram - The Moabites under Mesha their king were utterly routed and their cities destroyed. At Kir-haraseth Mesha made a final stand
Medeba - Mesha in the famous Dibon stone writes: "Omri took the land, Medeba, and occupied it (in his days and in) the days of his son 40 years"; no doubt as a fortress to command the surrounding district
Omri (1) - This is acknowledged by the Moabite king Mesha in an inscription which has come down to us
mo'Abite Stone, the - On this stone is the record in the Phoenician characters of the wars of Mesha, king of Moab, with Israel
Aroer - The Moabites had gained control of Aroer under King Mesha, as his inscription on the Moabite Stone witnesses (about 850 B
Jehoram - It is probable that the Moabites assumed the offensive, and took the Israelite cities of whose capture Mesha boasts
Lamb - Κar , "the wether": Mesha of Moab paid 100,000 as tribute to Israel (Isaiah 16:1; 2 Kings 3:4)
Joktan, - , was one of the two sons of Eber, and the father of thirteen sons or races ( Genesis 10:25-30 , 1 Chronicles 1:19-23 ); In the first table it is added that his descendants dwelt from Mesha to Sephar
Ahab - In this inscription Mesha, king of Moab, observed that his land was under Israelite control for a period of 40 years. Mesha also claimed to have gained independence from Ahab's Israel
Medeba - 8, took Mehedeba , and Israel held it forty years, till Mesha recovered it and rebuilt the cities held by Omri and Ahab
Moab, Moabites - Our next information comes from the so-called ‘ Moabite Stone ,’ an inscription of Mesha, king of Moab, found at the ancient Dibon, and now preserved in the Louvre. Mesha states that Omri, king of Israel, conquered Moab, and that Moab continued subject to Israel till the middle of the reign of Ahab, when Chemosh enabled him (Mesha) to win victories over Israel, which secured Moabitish independence, and which he describes in detail. The references to Chemosh in Mesha’s inscription are very similar to references to Jahweh in Israelitish writings of the same period
Moab - The famous Moabite Stone, bearing an inscription of Mesha, a king of Moab, about 900 b
Issachar - This name Dodo , occurring on the Mesha stele as that of a divinity, has led to the suggestion that he may have been worshipped in early times by the tribe
Gad - Gilead there takes its place, but Mesha (9th cent. As the Mesha stone shows, they had probably at that time absorbed the Reubenites, who had been more exposed previously to Moabite attacks, which at this time fell more directly upon Gad
Human Sacrifice - In the ninth century Mesha, king of Moab, offered his own son as a burnt offering presumably to Chemosh, national god of Moab, upon the walls of his capital while under siege by Israel and Judah (2 Kings 3:27 )
mo'ab - Finally, shut up within the walls of his own capital, the king, Mesha, in the sight of the thousands who covered the sides of that vast amphitheater, killed and burnt his child as a propitiatory sacrifice to the cruel gods of his country
Jehoshaphat - The Moabites were subdued; but the dreadful act of Mesha in offering his own son a sacrifice on the walls of Kir-haresheth in the sight of the armies of Israel filled him with horror, and he withdrew and returned to his own land (2 Kings 3:4-27 )
Moloch - In this respect Moloch answered to Baal the Phoenician sun god, to whom also human burnt offerings were sacrificed; also to Chemosh, to whom Mesha sacrificed his son (2 Kings 3:27; Micah 6:7; Ezekiel 16:20; Ezekiel 23:39)
Nebo - The Moabite town called Nebo is mentioned in Numbers 32:3 ; Numbers 32:33 ; Numbers 33:47 , Isaiah 15:2 , Jeremiah 48:1 ; Jeremiah 48:22 , 1 Chronicles 5:8 , and also in the inscription of Mesha, who says: ‘And Chemosh said unto me, Go take Nebo against Israel
Ashtoreth - Mesha, king of Moab, dedicated his prisoners to a composite goddess ‘Ashtar-Chemosh
Jehoram - With Judah (whose territory Moab had invaded, 2 Chronicles 20, and so provoked Jehoshaphat) and Edom as allies, Jehoram warred against Mesha, who had since Ahaziah's reign (2 Kings 1:1) withheld the yearly tribute due to Israel, "100,000 lambs and the wool of 100,000 rams" (Keil) (2 Kings 3; Isaiah 16:1). The Dibon stone records probably the victories of Mesha subsequent to this, though the allies' circuitous route S. across Jordan, may have resulted from Mesha's successes already in the latter quarter
City - Mesha, king of Moab, tells in his famous inscription how, as there was ‘no cistern in the midst of’ a certain city, he ‘said to all the people: make you each a cistern in his house’ (cf
Hebrew - To these may be added the Moabite Stone (Stele of Mesha, ninth century) and the Ammonite stele (ninth century) which contain inscriptions in languages very similar to classical Hebrew
Reuben - In the Mesha inscription (9th cent
Kings, the Books of - The Egyptian king Psinaches' patronage of Hadad the Edomite (1 Kings 11:19-20): Solomon's alliance with his successor Psusennes who reigned 35 years; Shishak's (Sesonchis I) accession toward the close of Solomon's reign (1 Kings 11:40); his conquest of Judea under Rehoboam, represented on a monument still at Karnak which mentions "the king of Judah," the time of the Ethiopian dynasty of So (Sabak) and Tirhakah, of the 25th dynasty; the rise and speedy fall of Syrian power, Assyria overshadowing it; the account of Mesha harmonizing with the (See DIBON stone; Assyria's struggles with Egypt and Babylon's' sudden supremacy under Nebuchadnezzar over both Assyria and Egypt: all these notices in Kings accord with independent pagan history and inscriptions. The names of Omri, Mesha, Jehu, Menahem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, are deciphered in inscriptions of campaigns of Tiglath Pileser, Sargon, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon
Moab - At Kirhareseth or Kerak his immolation of his own son struck superstitious fear into the besiegers so that they retired (2 Kings 3:27; compare Micah 6:5-8); and then followed all the conquests which Mesha records on the Moabite stone
Transportation And Travel - ... Kings of the ancient Near East (Shulgi of Ur III, Mesopotamia, and Mesha, king of Moab) often boasted in their official inscriptions of their road-building activities
Moab - Mesha, king of Moab, refused the tribute of a hundred thousand lambs, and as many rams, which till then had been customarily paid, either yearly, or at the beginning of every reign; which of these two is not clearly expressed in Scripture
Division of the Earth - Of the numerous children of Joktan, it is said by Moses, that "their dwelling was from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar, a mount of the east
Gods, Pagan - Mesha, king of Moab, probably offered up his son Chemosh (2 Kings 3:27 )
Canon of the Old Testament - 1400 sent their reports to Egypt in Babylonian cuneiform; whereas Mesha, king of Moab, and Panammu, king of Ya’di in North Syria, in extant Inscriptions from about b
Elisha - Israel, and Edom, in order to invade the rebelling Moabite king Mesha from the eastern side, since he was (according to the Moabite stone) carrying all before him in the N