Places Study on Lycia

Places Study on Lycia

Acts 27: And when we had sailed over the sea of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra, a city of Lycia.

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Lycia

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Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Lycia
a country of Asia Minor, having Phrygia on the north, Pamphylia on the east, the Mediterranean on the south, and Caria on the west. The greatest part of the country, however, is a peninsula projecting into the Mediterranean. Lycia derived its name from Lycus, the son of Pandion, who settled here. It was conquered by Croesus, king of Lydia, and passed with his kingdom into the hands of the Persians. It afterward, in common with the neighbouring countries of Asia Minor, formed part of the Macedonian empire, under Alexander; then of that of the Seleucidae, his successors in those countries; and, at the time of the Apostles, was reduced to the state of a Roman province.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Lycia
A wolf, a province in the south-west of Asia Minor, opposite the island of Rhodes. It forms part of the region now called Tekeh. It was a province of the Roman empire when visited by Paul (Acts 21:1 ; 27:5 ). Two of its towns are mentioned, Patara (21:1,2) and Myra (27:5).

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Lycia
A province in S.W. of Asia Minor opposite Rhodes. Pamphylia is on E., Carla W., Phrygia N., the Mediterranean S. The Taurus range here descends to the sea, with the river Xanthus flowing between its heights Cragus and Anticragus. Its two chief towns Patara and Myra Paul visited, during the period when Lycia and Pamphylia in Claudius' reign were combined under one proconsul (Acts 21:1; Acts 27:5). Previously it was allowed to form all independent state, its golden period. Sir C. Fellows brought to the British Museum interesting specimens of its coins and ancient architecture.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Lycia
LYCIA was a mountainous country in the S.W. of Asia Minor, which played very little part in the early history of Christianity. In it were situated many great cities, such as Patara ( Acts 21:1 ) and Myra ( Acts 27:5 ; cf. Acts 21:1 ). The former was a celebrated seat of the worship of Apollo, the latter an important harbour, between which and Alexandria there was constant traffic in ancient times. Lycia was ruled by the Persians, and conquered by Alexander the Great. After his death it belonged to the Seleucid Empire, was then taken from Antiochus by the Romans in b.c. 188, and given to Rhodes at first, but afterwards freed in b.c. 168. It was one of the self-governing states, to which the Romans sent letters in favour of the Jews in b.c. 138 7 ( 1Ma 15:22 ); see Caria, Delos. This proves that there were Jews there. Lycia was made a Roman province by Claudius in a.d. 43 on account of dissensions between its cities, and in a.d. 74 was formed into a double province along with Pamphylia.

A. Souter.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Lycia
(lihc' ih uh) Geographical name indicating the projection on the southern coast of Asia Minor between Caria and Pamphylia. See Acts 27:5 .



Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Lycia
(Λυκία, Eth. Λύκιος)

Lycia was a secluded mountain-land in the S.W, of Asia Minor, bounded on the W. by Caria, on the N. by Phrygia and Pisidia, on the N.E. by Pamphilia, and on the S. by the Lycian Sea. It was ‘beyond the Taurus’ (ἐκτὸς τοῦ Ταύρου). The ribs of that huge backbone of the country extended from N. to S. (in some places over 10,000 ft. in height), and between them were well-watered and fertile valleys, the homes of a highly civilized race, who in their love of peace and freedom resembled the Swiss. They were not Greek by race, but they were early hellenized. They had many overlords-Persians, Seleucids, Ptolemys, Romans-but for the most part their autonomy was undisturbed, and they had one of the finest constitutions in ancient times.

As the Lycians were suspected of favouring the Imperial party in the Civil Wars of Rome, Brutus and Cassius almost annihilated the beautiful city of Xanthus (43 b.c.), and the country never recovered its old prosperity. Pliny says that in his time the cities of Lycia, formerly 70 in number, had been reduced to 36 (Historia Naturalis (Pliny) v. 28). In a.d. 43 it was made a Roman province, and in a.d. 74 Vespasian formed the united province of Lycia-Pamphylia. Lycia is named in 1 Maccabees 15:23 as one of the Free States to which the Romans sent letters in favour of the Jewish settlers. Two of its principal seaports-Patara and Myra-are mentioned in Acts (Acts 21:1; Acts 27:5). But it appears to have been one of the last parts of Asia Minor to accept Christianity. Among the provinces addressed in 1 Peter 1:1 as having been partly evangelized, neither Lycia nor Pamphylia-both south of the Taurus-finds a place.

Literature.-C. Fellows, Discoveries in Lycia during 2nd Excursion in Asia Minor, 1841; T. A. B. Spratt and E. Forbes, Travels in Lycia, Milyas, and the Cibyratis, 1847; Benndorf-Niemann, Reisen in südwestl. Kleinasien, i.: ‘Reisen in Lykien und Karien,’ 1884.

James Strahan.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Lycia
A province of Asia Minor. Paul landed here in his way to Rome. (Acts 27:5)

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Lycia
District in the S.W. of Asia Minor. It was formerly a part of Pamphylia, but increased in importance and became a separate district, with Myra for its capital. Acts 27:5 .

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lycia
Lycia (lĭsh'i-ah), a region of Asia Minor, on the Mediterranean, between Caria and Pamphylia. It acquired some political importance, as shown by 1 Maccabees 15:23. In the reign of Claudius it became a Roman province. Paul visited it, and preached the gospel in its two largest cities, Patara, Acts 21:1, and Myra, Acts 27:5.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Lycia
A province in the southwest of Asia Minor bounded west by Caria, east by Pamphylia, north by Phrygia and Pisidia, and south by the Mediterranean. The country is somewhat mountainous, though not barren. Of its cities, only Patara and Myra are mentioned in the New Testament, Acts 21:1,2 ; 27:5 .

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Lycia
The small province of Lycia in south-west Asia Minor was important mainly for its two ports, Myra and Patara. From these ports ships sailed east to Phoenicia, south to Egypt and west to Greece and Italy. The Bible records two occasions when ships on which Paul travelled called at the ports of Lycia (Acts 21:1-2; Acts 27:5-6).

Myra - A town of Lycia, where Paul embarked for Rome, on board a ship of Alexandria, Acts 27:5
Lycia - Λύκιος)... Lycia was a secluded mountain-land in the S. by the Lycian Sea. ... As the Lycians were suspected of favouring the Imperial party in the Civil Wars of Rome, Brutus and Cassius almost annihilated the beautiful city of Xanthus (43 b. Pliny says that in his time the cities of Lycia, formerly 70 in number, had been reduced to 36 (Historia Naturalis (Pliny) v. 74 Vespasian formed the united province of Lycia-Pamphylia. Lycia is named in 1 Maccabees 15:23 as one of the Free States to which the Romans sent letters in favour of the Jewish settlers. Among the provinces addressed in 1 Peter 1:1 as having been partly evangelized, neither Lycia nor Pamphylia-both south of the Taurus-finds a place. Fellows, Discoveries in Lycia during 2nd Excursion in Asia Minor, 1841; T. Forbes, Travels in Lycia, Milyas, and the Cibyratis, 1847; Benndorf-Niemann, Reisen in südwestl
Patara - A sea-port of Lycia
Myra - Seaport of Lycia, in Asia Minor, where Paul and those with him embarked on a ship sailing to Italy
Phaselis - extremity of the coast of Lycia, a Dorian colony which apparently always maintained its independence of the rest of Lycia
Patara - City on the coast of Lycia in Asia Minor
Pamphylia - District in the south of Asia Minor, having Cilicia on the east and Lycia on the S
Phase'Lis, - a town on the coast of Asia Minor, on the confines of Lycia and Pamphylia, and consequently ascribed by the ancient writers sometimes to one and sometimes to the other
Pamphyl'ia - (of every tribe ), one of the coast-regions in the south of Asia Minor, having Cilicia on the east and Lycia on the west. Paul's time it was not only a regular province, but the emperor Claudius had united Lycia with it, and probably also a good part of Pisidia
Lycia - Lycia was a mountainous country in the S. Lycia was ruled by the Persians, and conquered by Alexander the Great. Lycia was made a Roman province by Claudius in a
Patara - A great seaport on the coast of Lycia, a few miles E. The valley of this river is the best part of Lycia, and doubtless from early times Patara had a local trade, but its importance depended on its convenient position for the trade between the West and the Levant. ... Lycia was never definitely colonized by Greeks, and the Lycians spoke a non-Aryan language. 440, and the chief Lycian god was identified with Apollo, whose celebrated oracle at Patara gave him the title Patareus (Hor
Patara - of Lycia, about 6 miles S. 182), whose temple and oracle there were only less famous than those at Delphi: ‘Pataraean Apollo who haunts the thickets of Lycia’ (Hor. The coaster in which he had sailed from Troas had either reached her destination or else was about to continue her course along the south coast, whereas larger vessels bound from Lycia for Syria struck right across the high sea, passing Cyprus on the left (Acts 21:3). Ptolemy Philadelphus enlarged and improved the city, calling it ‘the Lycian Arsince’ in honour of his wife, ‘but the old name prevailed’ (Strabo, XIV. Forbes, Travels in Lycia, Milyas, and the Cibyratis, 2 vols. There are extensive and well-preserved ruins, including a triumphal arch with the inscription, ‘Patara, the metropolis of the Lycian nation. Fellows, Account of Discoveries in Lycia, 1841; O
Myra - City of Lycia in Asia Minor, about two miles inland from its port Andriaca, where on his journey to Rome, Saint Paul and the other prisoners were removed to "a ship sailing into Italy" (Acts 27); in the Vulgate Lystra is substituted for Myra
my'ra, - an important town in Lycia, on the southwest coast of Asia Minor, on the river Andriacus, 21 miles from its mouth referred to in (Acts 27:5 ) Myra (named Dembra by the Greeks) Is remarkable still for its remains of various periods of history
Myra - An ancient port in Lycia, on the southwest coast of Asia Minor
Myra - One of the chief towns of Lycia, in Asia Minor, about 2 1/2 miles from the coast (Acts 27:5 )
Pamphylia - Lycia west, Pisidia north, and the Mediterranean south
Myra - MYRA was a city of Lycia situated 2 1 / 2 miles from the coast, but the same name is often applied to its harbour of Andriaca. In Greek times Patara surpassed it, but in Roman times Myra became the chief seaport of Lycia, and was recognized by Theodoslus as the capital. The Alexandrian ships did not coast round the Levant, but took advantage of the steady west winds to cross direct between Lycia and Egypt. Mediterranean, doubtless taking the place of a Lycian god to whom the sailors paid their vows on landing at Myra
Lyc'ia - The Lycians were incorporated in the Persian empire, and their ships were conspicuous in the great war against the Greeks (Herod. After the death of Alexander the Great, Lycia was included in the Greek Seleucid kingdom, and was a part of the territory which the Romans forced Antiochus to cede. It was not till the reign of Claudius that Lycia became part of the Roman provincial system. Paul visited the Lycian towns of Patara, ( Acts 21:1 ) and Myra
Lycia - Lycia (lĭsh'i-ah), a region of Asia Minor, on the Mediterranean, between Caria and Pamphylia
Patara - A city on the south-west coast of Lycia at which Paul landed on his return from his third missionary journey (Acts 21:1,2 )
Pamphylia - It lay between Lycia on the west and Cilicia on the east
Patara - shore of Lycia, near the left bank of the Xanthus and opposite Rhodes (Acts 21:1-2)
Pamphylia - To the south it is bounded by the Mediterranean, and to the north by Pisidia; having Lycia to the west, and Cilicia to the east
Patara - A maritime city of Lycia in Asia Minor, at the mouth of the river Xanthus, celebrated for an oracle of Apollo, who was supposed to reside here during the six winter months, and the rest of the year at Delos
Rhodes - From Rhodes he went eastward to Patara in Lycia. and Lycia to the E
Pamphylia - by Lycia, E. In Paul's time it with Lycia formed a province under the emperor Claudius
Pat'Ara - (city of Patarus ), a Lycian city situated on the southwestern shore of Lycia, not far from the left bank of the river Xanthus
Adramyttium - He was conveyed in it only to Myra, in Lycia, whence he sailed in an Alexandrian ship to Italy
Patara - Patara (păt'a-rah), a seaport town on the southwest shore of Lycia, near the left bank of Xanthus, and opposite Rhodes
Apphianus, or Appianus, or Amphianus, m - , a son of rich parents at "Pagae" (probably Araxas) in Lycia, educated in the schools of Berytus, who being not twenty years old interrupted the governor at Caesarea when sacrificing, by an exhortation to desist from idolatry, and was, after horrible tortures—e
Sarcophagus - It is otherwise called lapis Assius, or Assian stone, and is said to have been found at Assos, a city of Lycia
Lycia - Its two chief towns Patara and Myra Paul visited, during the period when Lycia and Pamphylia in Claudius' reign were combined under one proconsul (Acts 21:1; Acts 27:5)
Adramyttium - At Myra in Lycia accordingly they found an Alexandrian ship bound for Italy
Myra - A town in Lycia, where Paul was taken from the Adramyttian ship into the Alexandrian ship bound for Rome
Pisidia - by Phrygia and Lycia, S
Lycia - Lycia derived its name from Lycus, the son of Pandion, who settled here
Rhodes - 58, went from Miletus to Coos, from Coos to Rhodes, and from thence to Patara, in Lycia, Acts 21:1
Christopher, a Martyr of Universal Fame - 250) under Decius in Lycia
Pamphylia - 17) indicates that Claudius instituted the province of Lycia-Pamphylia in a. 43, but Mommsen has proved by means of a recently discovered inscription ‘that Pamphylia was a distinct procuratorial province for some time later, then was connected with Galatia for a short time, and at last was united to Lycia by Vespasian’ (W. The provinces named in 1 Peter 1:1 as having Christian converts within their borders sum up the whole of Asia Minor north of the Taurus, but Pamphylia and Lycia are conspicuous by their absence
Asia - The Asia spoken of in the Bible is Asia Minor, a peninsula which lies between the Euxine or Black sea and the eastern part of the Mediterranean, and which formerly included the provinces of Phrygia, Cilicia, Pamphylia, Caria, Lycia, Lydia, Mysia, Bithynia, Paphlagonia, Cappadocia, Galatia, Lycaonia, and Pisidia
Myra - ; often written Μύρρα, as in B)... Myra was ‘a city of Lycia’ (Acts 27:5), situated on a hill 2½ miles from the sea (Strabo, XIV. In the time of the Ptolemys, Myra shared with other Lycian towns the benefits of a great maritime traffic which was developed between Egypt and Asia Minor; and when Rome became mistress of the world, the conditions of navigation in the Mediterranean made Myra a place of growing importance. The corn-ships of Alexandria, which brought food to the population of Rome, were in the habit of sailing due north to Lycia, making Myra a place of call, and then proceeding westward
Asia - by the province of Lycia, and had been ceded to the Romans by the will of the Pergamenian king Attalus III
Nicholas of Bari, Saint - Confessor, Bishop of Myra; born Patara, Lycia, Asia Minor; died Myra, c352Although he is popular in the Greek as well as the Latin Church, nothing is historically certain about him except that he was Bishop of Myra in the 4th century
Nicholas of Myra, Saint - Confessor, Bishop of Myra; born Patara, Lycia, Asia Minor; died Myra, c352Although he is popular in the Greek as well as the Latin Church, nothing is historically certain about him except that he was Bishop of Myra in the 4th century
Myra, Nicholas of, Saint - Confessor, Bishop of Myra; born Patara, Lycia, Asia Minor; died Myra, c352Although he is popular in the Greek as well as the Latin Church, nothing is historically certain about him except that he was Bishop of Myra in the 4th century
Bari, Nicholas of, Saint - Confessor, Bishop of Myra; born Patara, Lycia, Asia Minor; died Myra, c352Although he is popular in the Greek as well as the Latin Church, nothing is historically certain about him except that he was Bishop of Myra in the 4th century
Adramyttium - Luke sailed from Caesarea by Sidon and under the lee (to the east) of Cyprus to Myra in Lycia, where they joined a corn-ship of Alexandria bound for Italy (Acts 27:2-6)
Rhodes - ) a large part of Lycia and Caria, but when she began to be dreaded as a possible rival of Rome itself, she was not only shorn of these possessions, but nearly ruined in her commerce by the raising of her rival Delos into a free port. Vespasian made the island a part of the province of Lycia
Nicolaus, Bishop of Myra - of Myra in Lycia at the time of Diocletian's persecution, and one of the most popular saints both in the East and West
Rhodes - , after the settlement with Rome in 189 made it mistress of great part of Caria and Lycia. 166 Rome declared the Carian and Lycian cities independent, and made Delos a free port
Pisidia - by Lycia, and on the E. 74 Vespasian transferred a great part of Pisidia to the new double province of Lycia-Pamphylia
Alexandria - At Myra in Lycia (Acts 27:5) the centurion found this Alexandrian
Pamphylia - coast of Asia Minor, lying between Lycia and Cilicia
Lycia - The small province of Lycia in south-west Asia Minor was important mainly for its two ports, Myra and Patara. The Bible records two occasions when ships on which Paul travelled called at the ports of Lycia (Acts 21:1-2; Acts 27:5-6)
Epaphroditus - Pseudo-Dorotheus includes him (without probability, however, since nothing suggests that he was a Hebrew) among the Seventy of Luke 10:1; and he calls him ‘bishop’ of Andriace, the port of Myra in Lycia
Phrygia - 25, and was therefore included in the new province which extended from Lycia on the S
Per'Sia - This conquest was followed closely by the submission of the Greek settlements on the Asiatic coast, and by the reduction of Caria and Lycia The empire was soon afterward extended greatly toward the northeast and east
Alexandria - Paul sailed from Myra, a city of Lycia, on his way to Rome, Acts 27:5-6
Claudius - Lycia, owing to disturbances, was made an Imperial province, under a legatus pro praetore
Amphilochius, Archbishop of Iconium - 200), and Lycia ( Ep
Titus (Emperor) - To this year belong also various improvements to roads in Italy, Spain, Galatia, and Lycia
Province - The important Imperial provinces, which required the presence of an army, were twenty-one in number: Suria (Syria), Hispania Tarraconensis, Germania Superior, Germania Inferior, Britannia, Pannonia Superior, Pannonia Inferior, Mcesia Superior, Mcesia Inferior, Dalmatia, Lusitania, Gallia Aquitanica, Gallia Lugudunensis, Gallia Belgica, Galatia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Cilicia et Syria et PhCEnice, Numidia, Cappadocia,_ each governed by a legatus Augusti pro praetore, and Egypt, governed by an equestrian praefectus aegypti, acting for his master the Emperor, who reigned as king of Egypt
Trade And Commerce - Paul found an Alexandrian trading vessel at Myra in Lycia (Acts 27:6). Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia [Ramsay, Historical Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians, London, 1899, map opposite to p
Roman Law in the nt - of the provinces of Mcesia Superior and Thracia, which are not referred to in the NT, and do not contain any of the places there mentioned; Pamphylia; Lycia. 74: Lycia is mentioned in Acts 27:5 as a separate province [cf
Antiochus - ... Next he thought, by wedding his "daughter" Cleopatra to Ptolemy Epiphanes, ultimately to gain Cilicia, Lycia, and even Egypt itself; "corrupting her," i
Trade And Commerce - Paul found an Alexandrian trading vessel at Myra in Lycia (Acts 27:6). Cicero, in spite of his good government of the large province of Cilicia (the name included in his time Cilicia, Cilicia Tracheia, Pamphylia, Lycia, Pisidia, Isaurica, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and part of Galatia [Ramsay, Historical Commentary on the Epistle to the Galatians, London, 1899, map opposite to p
Theophilus, Bishop of Alexandria - When at last he set forth, as he passed through Lycia he is said to have boasted that he was "going to court to depose John" ( ib
Thecla - Paul was her first thought and hearing he was at Myra in Lycia she disguised herself in man's attire and set out with a train of attendants male and female
Roman Empire - Lycia was united to Pamphylia as a province under one governor in 43
Galatia - It is evidently the writer’s purpose to enumerate all the provinces of Asia Minor, with the exception of Lycia-Pamphilia, where ‘the elect’ were still few (as maybe inferred from Acts 13:18; Acts 14:25), and Cilicia, which was reckoned with Syria (Acts 15:23; Acts 15:41)
Roads And Travel - His province, named Cilicia, comprised a very large territory, indeed the whole of what was afterwards Southern Galatia, as well as Lycia, Pamphylia, Cilicia (proper), etc
Paul - From Miletus he sailed by Cos, Rhodes, and Patara in Lycia, to Tyre, Acts 21