Places Study on Ituraea

Places Study on Ituraea

Luke 3: Now in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea, and Herod being tetrarch of Galilee, and his brother Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and of the region of Trachonitis, and Lysanias the tetrarch of Abilene,

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Holman Bible Dictionary - Ituraea
(iht yoo ree' uh) Place name meaning, “related to Jetur.” Region over which Herod Philip was governor when John the Baptist began his public ministry (Luke 3:1 ). It was located northeast of Galilee between the Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon mountains, though its precise boundaries are almost impossible to determine. Racially, the Ituraeans were of Ishmaelite stock; their origin probably should be traced to Jetur the son of Ishmael (Genesis 25:15 ). The earliest extant reference to the Ituraeans as a people dates from the second century B.C. Pompey conquered the territory for Rome about 50 B.C. Ituraea was eventually absorbed into other political districts, losing its distinct identity by the end of the first century A.D. See Herods; Geography.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ituraea
The region N. of Palestine. With Trachonitis Ituraea formed the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1). Stretching from mount Hermon toward the N.E., i.e. toward Hauran, and from Damascus to northern Bashan. Called from Jetur, Ishmael's son (Genesis 25:15-16). The tribe of Manasseh wrested it from the Hagrites (Ishmaelites), Jetur, Nephish, and Nodab, and "increased from Bashan unto Baal Hermon and Senir, and unto mount Hermon"; i.e., they added Ituraea to Bashan, Gaulonitis, and Trachonitis, which they already possessed (1 Chronicles 5:19; 1 Chronicles 5:23). Rome gave Ituraea to Herod the Great, 20 B.C., who bequeathed it to his son Philip. Now Jedur, with 38 towns and villages, of which ten are desolate and the rest very poor. Trachonitis was on its E., Gaulonitis on its S., Hermon on its W., and the Damascus plain on its N. An undulating table land with conical hills; the southern portion watered by streams from Hermon; the N. covered with jagged rocks of basalt seamed by chasms or sunk into pits, the molten lava having become fissured in cooling.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ituraea
ITURÆA [the name is probably derived from Jetur , who is mentioned in Genesis 25:15 and 1 Chronicles 1:31 as a son of Ishmael], with Trachonitis, constituted the tetrarchy of Philip ( Luke 3:1 ). But whether ‘Ituræa’ is employed by the Evangelist as a noun or an adjective is a disputed point. Ramsay contends ( Expositor , Jan., Feb., Apr., 1894) that no Greek writer prior to Eusebius in the 4th cent. a.d. ever uses it as the name of a country. The Ituræans as a people were well known to classical writers. According to Cicero ( Philipp . ii. 112), they were a ‘predatory people’; according to Cæsar ( Bell. Afr . 20), they were ‘skilful archers’; according to Strabo (xvi. ii. 10 etc.), they were ‘lawless.’ They seem to have migrated originally from the desert to the vicinity of Southern Lebanon and Cœle-Syria. Both Strabo and Josephus ( Ant . XIII. xi. 3) locate them in these parts. The Romans probably caused them to retreat towards the desert again shortly before the Christian era. Lysanias the son of Ptolemy is called by Dio Cassius (xlix. 32) ‘king of the Ituræans.’ He was put to death by Mark Antony in b.c. 34. Zenodorus his successor died in b.c. 20, whereupon a part of his territory fell into the hands of Herod the Great; and when Herod’s kingdom was divided, it became the possession of Philip (Jos. [Note: Josephus.] Ant . XV. x. 3). Whether Ituræa and Trachonitis overlapped (as Ramsay thinks), or were two distinct districts (as Strabo), is uncertain; G. A. Smith in his art. ‘Ituræa’ in Hastings’ DB [Note: Dictionary of the Bible.] is non-committal. The passage in Luke seems to favour a distinct and definite district, which was probably somewhere N.E. of the Sea of Galilee.

George L. Robinson.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ituraea
A province on the east of the upper Jordan of which Herod Philip was made tetrarch. Luke 3:1 . Its boundaries cannot be well defined, but it reached toward Damascus and embraced the southern slopes of Anti-Lebanon. Its name is derived from JETUR, son of Ishmael. Genesis 25:15 .

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ituraea
A district in the north-east of Palestine, forming, along with the adjacent territory of Trachonitis, the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1 ). The present Jedur comprehends the chief part of Ituraea. It is bounded on the east by Trachonitis, on the south by Gaulanitis, on the west by Hermon, and on the north by the plain of Damascus.

Sentence search

Iturea - (iht yoo ree' uh) Alternate spelling for Ituraea. See Ituraea
Jetur - Ituraea
je'Tur - ( Genesis 25:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:31 ; 5:19 ) [Ituraea ]
Jetur - See Ituraea
Ituraea - With Trachonitis Ituraea formed the tetrarchy of Philip (Luke 3:1). , they added Ituraea to Bashan, Gaulonitis, and Trachonitis, which they already possessed (1 Chronicles 5:19; 1 Chronicles 5:23). Rome gave Ituraea to Herod the Great, 20 B
Tetrarch - in reference to Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea; Philip, tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis; and Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene
Ituraea - The present Jedur comprehends the chief part of Ituraea
Jetur - See Ituraea
Hauran - It now includes the ancient Trachonitis, the Haouran, Ituraea, and part of Batanaea, and is very minutely described by Burckhardt
Tetrarch - ) As Archelaus was "ethnarch" over half of Herod the Great's whole kingdom, so Philip and Antipus had divided between them the remaining half, and were each "tetrarch" over the fourth; Herod over Galilee; Philip over Ituraea and Trachonitis; Lysanias over Abilene
Herod Agrippa i - He was appointed by the emperor Caligula to the government of Ituraea and Abilene, with the title of king
Trachonitis - Philip was tetrarch of Trachonitis and Ituraea. by Ituraea (Jedur) and Damascus
Ituraea - Racially, the Ituraeans were of Ishmaelite stock; their origin probably should be traced to Jetur the son of Ishmael (Genesis 25:15 ). The earliest extant reference to the Ituraeans as a people dates from the second century B. Ituraea was eventually absorbed into other political districts, losing its distinct identity by the end of the first century A
Herod, Family of - Philip tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis
Hauran - Afterwards it became the province, including Ituraea, ruled over by Philip
Golan - by Jedur (Ituraea) and on E
Hauran - Within its limits are also included, beside Trachonitis, Ituraea or Ittur, now called Djedour, and part of Batanaea or Bashan
Bashan - The ancient Bashan covered the Roman provinces named Gaulonitis, trachonitis, Auranitis, Batanaea, and Ituraea
Hazor - , Ituraea
Abila - At his death the southern part was added to Trachonitis and Ituraea, as a tetrarchy for his son Philip
Lysanias - 32) as having been made king of Ituraea by Mark Antony and afterwards put to death by him. He makes an error in defining the limits of the realm of Philip, Ituraea. Luke’s text, or that it should be connected with Φιλίππου, making Philip the ‘tetrareh of Ituraea, Trachonitis, and the Abilene of Lysanias,’ i
Philip - Another son of Herod the Great: he was tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis
Philip - ) ... ... The "tetrarch of Ituraea" (Luke 3:1 ); a son of Herod the Great, and brother of Herod Antipas
Bashan - of Hauran and Jaulan lies Jedur, the Ituraea of the New Testament; the country of Jetur, son of Ishmael; possibly once part of Og's kingdom of Bashan
New Testament - Philip tetrarch of Ituraea, Trachonitis
Caesar - Luke wrote (Luke 3:1): ‘Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea,’ with the tetrarchs for Galilee, Ituraea, and Abilene, desiring to mark the period in the reign of Tiberius Caesar when ‘the word of God came to John in the wilderness
Galilee - Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the north; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south
Palestine - This province was subdivided into these districts, (1) Peraea proper, lying between the rivers Arnon and Jabbok; (2) Galaaditis (Gilead); (3) Batanaea; (4) Gaulonitis (Jaulan); (5) Ituraea or Auranitis, the ancient Bashan; (6) Trachonitis; (7) Abilene; (8) Decapolis, i
Nation (2) - For Herod’s kingdom was divided among three sons: Philip having the newly added territories of Trachonitis, Ituraea (Luke 3:1), etc
Judea - Auranitis, or Ituraea, a mountainous and barren tract north of Batantaea, and bounded on the west by a branch of Mount Hermon, contained Bostra, or Bozra, about fifty miles east from the sea of Tiberias, bordering on Arabia Petraea, afterward enlarged by Trajan, and named Trajana Bostra; and Trachonitis, in 33 15' north latitude, between Hermon and Antilibanus, eastward from the sources of Jordan, and containing Baal-gad, Mispah, Paneas, or Caesarea Philippi, and AEnos, nearly twenty-five miles east of Panaeas, and as far south south-west of Damascus
Roman Law in the nt - Herod Philip was tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis, and Lysanias of Abilene (Luke 3:1)