Places Study on Italy

Places Study on Italy

Acts 18: And found a certain Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla; (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome:) and came unto them.
Acts 27: And when it was determined that we should sail into Italy, they delivered Paul and certain other prisoners unto one named Julius, a centurion of Augustus' band.
Acts 27: And there the centurion found a ship of Alexandria sailing into Italy; and he put us therein.
Hebrews 13: Salute all them that have the rule over you, and all the saints. They of Italy salute you.

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Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Milan, Italy
(Celtic, met lan)

City in northern Italy. Founded in 396 B.C. by the Insubres, it became a Roman possession in 221 BC and after 296 AD was the capital of several emperors. The diocese established c.200was governed by several saints among whom are Saint Dionysius, Saint Ambrose, and Saint Petrus, the first archbishop. In 997 the title of count was given by Otto II to the archbishop whose power was diminished by the rise of the burghers who gained absolute authority in 1116. From this period, the history of the city is a succession of wars against the empire and internal disturbanccs which terminated when the archbishop Otto Visconti proclaimed himself perpetual lord, thus putting an end to the Republic of Milan. From 1500 the city was successively under the dominion of France, Spain, and Austria and finally in 1859 was annexed to the kingdom of Italy. The city is rich in works of art which include the magnificent cathedral begun in 1386 by Giovanni Galeazzo, the famous Last Supper of Leonardo da Vinci in the monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie, and numerous treasures by Bramante and Amadeo. The martyrdom of Saint Gervasius and Saint Protasius, Saint Victor, Saint Felix, etc., took place at Milan and several general councils were held there. See also,


city of Milan

patron saints index
The city is the seat of the archdiocese of Milan. It was founded as a diocese in the first century, one of the first sites in Italy. Elevated to an archdiocese in the 4th century. Suffragan dioceses include


Bergamo

Brescia

Como

Crema

Cremona

Lodi

Mantova

Pavia

Vigevano
Notable bishops and archbishops in its history include


Saint Ambrose of Milan

Saint Charles Borromeo

Blessed Andrea Carlo Ferrari

Blessed Alfredo Ildefonso Schuster

Pope Paul VI
See also


Catholic-Hiearchy.Org

archdiocese of Milan

patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Florence, Italy, City of
(Italian: Firenze)

City and former state of Italy. It was a flourishing municipium under Caesar; its first bishop was probably Saint Frontinus, disciple of Saint Peter. Municipal freedom began in 1155 and continued to develop despite Guelph and Ghibelline struggles from 1215, constant papal interference, and the rule of the Medici which commenced in 1434. The city was alternately a republic or an autocracy. In 1330 the authority of Florence was acknowledged by 46 towns. In 1530 the Medici gained absolute power which lasted until 1737. The city was the seat of the Seventeenth AEcumenical Council (1438-1445), the home of many saints (Catherine de' Ricci, Mary Magdalen de Pazzi, Philip Neri), and the birthplace of Dante, Giotto, Fra Angelico, Donatello, and of six popes. The Duomo or cathedral, dating from 1296, the Campanile begun by Giotto, the 7th-century church of San Giovanni and many other churches containing frescoes by Fra Lippo Lippi, Fra Angelico, Giotto, della Robbia, Ghirlandajo, Donatello, Ghiberti, Masaccio, Masolino, and others are of interest.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Padua, Italy, Diocese of
A city, the ancient "Patavium" of the Veneti, it was three times destroyed by Goths and Lombards (408-601), made a free commune, 1087, and its subsequent history is a succession of wars and civildisturbances until its capture by the Venetians, 1509. Among its famous buildings are the mixed Romanesque and Byzantine basilica of Saint Anthony, begun, 1232, and containing numerous art treasures, and the monastery of the Benedictines dating from the 9th century. Padua, the birth place of many celebrated men and women, gave many martyrs to the Church, Saint Giustina and Saint Daniel, and Bishop Maximus.

The city is the seat of an ancient diocese, whose traditional first bishop was Saint Prosdocimus (3century); Saint Gregorio Giovanni Gasparo Barbarigo served in the 17th century. Suffragen of the archdiocese of Venice. See also


Catholic-Hierarchy.Org

patron saints index: Padua, Italy, city of
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Florence, Italy, Archdiocese of
Also known as the archdiocese of Firenze. Founded in the 1century, one of the first outposts of the Church in Italy. Elevated to an archdiocese on May 10, 1419. Suffragan dioceses include


Arezzo-Cortona-Sansepolcro

Fiesole

Pistoia

Prato

San Miniato
Notable bishops include


Saint Antonius of Florence
See also


Catholic-Hierarchy.Org

archdiocese of Firenze

patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Naples, Italy, City of
City in southern Italy. Founded by Greeks from Cumae (4th century B.C.), Naples endured the barbarian invasions, and in 1041 was besieged by the Normans, whose conquest resulted in the acquisition of Sicily (1087) and the rise of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies or the Kingdom of Naples. After the Sicilian Vespers (1282), the history of Naples is a story of wars for succession. Under Spanish rule from 1442, conquered by Austria in the War of the Spanish Succession, a French republic in 1799, and a kingdom under Joseph Bonaparte in 1806, it was finally annexed to Italy in 1861. Its famous churches, among which are the Gothic Cathedral of Saint Januarius, begun in 1272, which shelters the martyr's relics, the baroque church of Saint Philip Neri, the Church of Saint Clare and the Monastery of San Domenico Maggiore (1255), containing the cell of Saint Thomas Aquinas, are rich in art treasures, and the secular buildings, including the royal palace and the museum have interesting archmological collections. See also.


archdiocese of Naples

patron saints index

Wikipedia

city of Naples
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Naples, Italy, Archdiocese of
Founded in the 1century, it is one of the earliest areas of Church activity. Elevated to an archdiocese during the 10th century. Illustrious bishops in its history include Saint Asprenus, Pope Paul IV, Blessed Paul Burali d'Arezzo, and Pope Innocent XII. Suffragen dioceses include


Acerra

Alife-Caiazzo

Aversa

Capua

Caserta

Ischia

Nola

Pompei o Beatissima Vergine Maria del SS.mo Rosario

Pozzuoli

Sessa Aurunca

Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia

Teano-Calvi
See also


city of Naples, Italy

patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Italy
Independent country of southern Europe. Christianity was introduced in Rome by Saint Peter and Saint Paul a few years after the Crucifixion, and was soon extended to all parts of Italy, with converts from all ranks, so that it was strongly established before the time of Constantine. Milan, Aquileia, and Ravenna gained ecclesiastical importance, and synods were frequent during the 4th and 5th centuries, especially in Rome. Unity with Constantinople was broken by the Acacian schism (484-519) which foreshadowed the great Eastern Schism. After a period of occupation by the Goths, Italy again became part of the Roman Empire, subject to the Caesaro-papism and later the culpable neglect of the Byzantine rulers, until Pepin and Charlemagne were summoned by the popes to save Rome from the Lombards. Through the gifts of the German rulers, the generosity of the people, and the need of self defense the States of the Church were established in Italy. In the second half of the 11th century arose the long conflict between the papacy and the German empire which had made use of the episcopal sees in northern and central Italy to maintain its claim to dominion over the peninsula. With the support of the Lombard League of Cities and the Normans in the south, the papacy was victorious in the first phase of the struggle. The second phase, arising from the union of the imperial crown with the royal crown of Sicily, resulted in the ruin of the Hohenstaufens. In the 13th century religious life was strengthened by the foundation of the mendicant orders and the rise of the great universities, as Bologna and Padua, under the patronage of the papacy which reached the height of its temporal power. In the following century with removal of the papal residence to Avignon, Italy became the prey of despots who dominated for selfish ends the prevailing anarchy. Not until the Western Schism ended (1417) did the Papal States recognize papal dominion, under Pope Martin V.

The rise of pagan humanism and moral laxity among clergy and laity alike in the 15th century was offset by the development of extraordinary sanctity (Saint Bernardine of Siena, Saint John Capistran, Saint Antoninus of Florence, Saint Frances of Rome). Protestantism gained no strong hold in Italy because of vigorous civiland ecclesiastical opposition, the antipathy of the people, and the union of religious, ecclesiastical, and theological activities in the Counter-Reformation. During the 17th and 18th centuries there were continuous conflicts between Catholic states in Italy and the Holy See, supplemented by the political disturbances occasioned by Jansenism, Gallicanism, and the resistance against the power of Islam. Italy became the instrument of Spanish and Austrian policy alternately, and suffered from the anti-ecclesiastical measures of Emperor Joseph II. Religious life continued to flourish in the foundation of the Redemptorists by Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1732) and the Passionists by Saint Paul of the Cross (1741). At the beginning of the 19th century Italy was divided among four powers, Austria, Sardinia, the papacy, and the Bourbons of Naples, Sicily, and Parma. Revolt against Austrian rule gathered momentum toward the middle of the century, and in 1859 Piedmont (now Sardinia) was victorious in the war for independence. It was then joined by Lombardy, Modena, Parma, Tuscany and the Romagna, the Marches and Umbria, Naples, and Sicily, and in 1861 the Kingdom of Italy was proclaimed at Turin. Venice was annexed in 1866, Rome taken by force of arms in 1870 and declared the capital of the kingdom, 1871. In the same year Pope Pius IX refused to accept the Law of Guarantees according temporal allegiance to the civilgovernment of Italy. In 1929 through the efforts of Benito Mussolini the government signed a pact with the Vatican recognizing the pope's rightful claim to sovereignty, thus settling the Italian question which had been the cause of incessant hostility between Church and State.

Archdioceses, past and present, include


Acerenza

Agrigento

Amalfi-Cava de' Tirreni

Ancona-Osimo

Bari-Bitonto

Benevento

Bologna

Brindisi-Ostuni

Cagliari

Camerino-San Severino Marche

Campagna

Campobasso-Boiano

Capua

Catania

Catanzaro-Squillace

Chieti-Vasto

Cosenza-Bisignano

Crotone-Santa Severina

Fermo

Ferrara-Comacchio

Firenze {Florence}

Foggia-Bovino

Gaeta

Genova

Gorizia

Lanciano-Ortona

L'Aquila

Lecce

Lucca

Manfredonia-Vieste-San Giovanni Rotondo

Matera

Matera-Irsina

Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela

Milano {Milan}

Modena-Nonantola

Monreale

Napoli {Naples}

Oristano

Otranto

Palermo

Perugia-Città della Pieve

Pesaro

Pescara-Penne

Pisa

Potenza-Muro Lucano-Marsico Nuovo

Ravenna-Cervia

Reggio Calabria-Bova

Rossano-Cariati

Salerno-Campagna-Acerno

Sant Angelo dei Lombardi-Conza-Nusco-Bisaccia

Santa Severina

Sassari

Siena-Colle di Val d'Elsa-Montalcino

Siracusa

Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia

Spoleto-Norcia

Taranto

Torino {Turin}

Trani-Barletta-Bisceglie (-Nazareth)

Trento

Udine

Urbino-Urbania-Sant'Angelo in Vado

Venezia

Vercelli
Dioceses, past and present, include:


Acerno

Acerra

Acireale

Acquapendente

Acqui

Adria-Rovigo

Alatri

Alba

Albenga-Imperia

Alessandria

Ales-Terralba

Alghero-Bosa

Alife-Caiazzo

Altamura-Gravina-Acquaviva delle Fonti

Amelia

Anagni-Alatri

Andria

Aosta

Aquino

Arezzo-Cortona-Sansepolcro

Ariano Irpino-Lacedonia

Ascoli Piceno

Assisi-Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino

Asti

Atri

Avellino

Aversa

Avezzano

Bagnoregio

Belluno-Feltre

Bergamo

Bertinoro

Biella

Bisaccia

Bisceglie

Bisignano

Bitonto

Bitonto

Bobbio-San Colombano

Bolzano-Bressanone {Bozen-Brixen}

Bosa

Bova

Bovino

Brescia

Brugnato

Cagli e Pergola

Caiazzo

Caltagirone

Caltanissetta

Campagna

Cariati

Carpi

Casale Monferrato

Caserta

Cassano all'Jonio

Castellammare di Stabia

Castellaneta

Cava e Sarno

Cefalù

Cerignola-Ascoli Satriano

Cerreto Sannita-Telese-Sant'Agata de' Goti

Cervia

Cesena-Sarsina

Chiavari

Chioggia

Chiusi-Pienza

Cingoli

Città della Pieve

Città di Castello

Civita Castellana (Orte, Gallese, Nepi e Sutri)

Civitaveccia

Civitaveccia-Tarquinia

Colle di Val d'Elsa

Comacchio (-Pomposa)

Como

Concordia-Pordenone

Conversano-Monopoli

Cortona

Crema

Cremona

Cuneo

Fabriano-Matelica

Faenza-Modigliana

Fano-Fossombrone-Cagli-Pergola

Feltre

Ferentino

Fidenza

Fiesole

Foligno

Forli-Bertinoro

Fossano

Fossombrone

Frosinone-Veroli-Ferentino

Gallese

Gallipoli

Giovinazzo

Gravina

Grosseto

Gualdo Tadino

Guastalla

Gubbio

Iglesias

Imola

Ischia

Isernia-Venafro

Ivrea

Jesi

Lacedonia

Lamezia Terme

Lanusei

Larino

La Spezia-Sarzana-Brugnato

Latina-Terracina-Sezze-Priverno

Lipari

Livorno

Locri-Gerace (-Santa Maria di Polsi)

Lodi

Loreto

Lucera-Troia

Macerata-Tolentino-Recanati-Cingoli-Treia

Mantova

Marsico Nuovo

Massa Carrara-Pontremoli

Massa Marittima-Piombino

Matelica

Mazara del Vallo

Melfi-Rapolla-Venosa

Mileto-Nicotera-Tropea

Modigliana

Molfetta-Ruvo-Giovinazzo-Terlizzi

Mondovi

Monopoli

Montalcino

Montalto

Montefiascone

Montepeloso

Montepeloso

Montepulciano-Chiusi-Pienza

Muro Lucano

Nardò-Gallipoli

Narni

Nepi e Sutri

Nicosia

Nicotera-Tropea

Nocera Inferiore-Sarno

Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino

Nola

Noli

Norcia

Noto

Novara

Numana

Nuoro

Nusco
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Italy
ITALY . This word varied in sense from time to time. It first signified only the Southern (the Greek) part of the peninsula; later it included all the country south of the Lombard plain; and finally, before the time of Christ, it had come to bear the meaning which it has now. Its central position in the Mediterranean, the conformation of its coast, and the capabilities of its soil under proper cultivation, fitted it to be the home and centre of a governing race. In the 1st cent. a.d. there was constant communication between the capital Rome and every part of the Empire, by well-recognized routes. Among the routes to the E., which mainly concern the NT student, was that from Rome along the W. coast of Italy to Campania, where it crossed the country and eventually reached Brundisium. From the harbour there the traveller either sailed across the Adriatic to Dyrrhachium, and went by the Egnatian road to Thessalonica and beyond, or sailed across to the Gulf of Corinth, transhipped from Lechæum to Cenchreæ (wh. see), and from there sailed to Ephesus or Antioch or Alexandria, as he desired. The best account of a home journey is in Acts 27:1-44 . The Jews poured into Italy, especially to Rome, and had been familiar to the Italians long before Christianity came.

A. Souter.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Italy
(iht' uh lee) The boot-shaped peninsula between Greece and Spain which extends from the Alps on the north to the Mediterranean Sea on the south. Its long narrow shape contributed to its ethnic diversity, with so many Greeks occupying the southern part that it was called “Great Greece” by the citizens of Rome. Through the Punic Wars with Carthage (264-146 B.C.), the city of Rome extended its control over the whole country and eventually conquered the entire Mediterranean. The Roman Empire was created when Octavian became Augustus Caesar (27 B.C.) after the murder of Julius Caesar and of the demise of the Republic (44 B.C.). Italy is named in the New Testament in Acts 18:2 ; Acts 27:1 ,Acts 27:1,27:6 and Hebrews 13:24 . John McRay



1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lucca, Italy, Archdiocese of
Founded as a diocese in the first century during the initial spread of Christianity. Elevated to an archdiocese on September 11, 1726. It is immediately subject to the Vatican, and has no suffragen dioceses. Notable bishops include


Saint Anselm of Lucca the Younger
See also


Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Italy
The peninsula from the Alps to the straits of Messina (Acts 18:2; Acts 27:1; Hebrews 13:24).

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Italy
(Ἰταλία)

The name was originally confined to the extreme southern point of the Italian peninsula. For the Greeks of the 5th cent. b.c. it denoted the tract along the shore of the Tarentine Gulf, as far as Metapontum, and thence across to the Gulf of Posidonia. By the time of Polybius the name had been extended to the whole peninsula, for he speaks of Hannibal crossing the Alps into Italy, and of the plains of the Padus as part of Italy (Hist. ii. 14, iii. 39, 54). At a later time, it is true, Gallia Cisalpina was officially regarded as part of Caesar’s province, and therefore not strictly in Italy, which he did not enter till he crossed the Rubicon; but from the Augustan Age onward the word had its present-day meaning. Scarcely any country has more clearly-marked and obvious boundaries.

The Latin language was inscribed upon the Cross of Christ, but none of the books of the NT were written in it. The founders of Christianity were not so greatly influenced by Italian as by Hebraic and Hellenic ideals. Nor did Italy herself dream that she had any kind of evangel for the East which she conquered. Her plain task was to give and maintain law and order everywhere, and her Imperial ideal certainly found its counterpart in the apostolic conception of a world-wide Church. But her own spiritual mission, so far as she was conscious of having one, was merely to be the apostle of Hellenism, of which she had for some centuries been the disciple.

‘The desire to become at least internally Hellenised, to become partakers of the manners and the culture, of the art and the science of Hellas, to be-in the footsteps of the great Macedonian-shield and sword of the Greeks of the East, and to be allowed further to civilise this East not after an Italian but after a Hellenic fashion-this desire pervades the later centuries of the Roman republic and the better times of the empire with a power and an ideality which are almost no less tragic than that political toil of the Hellenes failing to attain its goal’ (T. Mommsen, The Provinces of the Roman Empire2, Eng. translation , 1909, i. 253).

Some of the cities of Italy-certainly Rome and Puteoli, and probably others, though there is no definite information on the point-had felt the presence of Judaism before they were offered Christianity. Josephus mentions the Jewish colony of Puteoli in his story of the Jewish impostor who claimed to be Alexander the son of Herod (circa, about 4 b.c.). ‘He was also no fortunate, upon landing, as to bring the Jews that were there under the same delusion’ (Ant. xvii. xii. 1), and ‘he got very large presents’ from them (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii. vii. 1); but Augustus himself was not so easily deceived (Ant. xvii. xii. 2). Over half a century later, the first Puteolan Christians, whose fellowship St. Paul enjoyed for a week on his way to Rome (Acts 28:14), were evidently drawn from that same Jewish community and its proselytes. The presence of a great Jewish colony in Rome, dating from the time when Pompey brought his prisoners of war from Jerusalem, is abundantly attested by Latin historians and poets. It is equally certain that they made many proselytes. The swindling of Fulvia, ‘a woman of great dignity, and one that had embraced the Jewish religion’ (Ant. xviii. iii. 5), by another Jew of the baser type was the signal for an outburst against the whole colony in the time of Tiberius (Tac. Ann. ii. 85; Suet. Tiber. 36). According to Acts 18:2 Claudius went the length of expelling all the Jews from Rome (cf. Suet. Claud. 25). Even if his decree only amounted to the interdicting of their assemblies (Dio Cassius, lx. 6), this milder measure would doubtless cause a great exodus from the city. Some of the exiles merely emigrated to the neighbourhood, perhaps to Aricia (for the evidence sec E. Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] ii, ii. [1885] 238), but others went abroad. This was the occasion of the journey of Aquila and Priscilla ‘from Italy’ to Corinth (Acts 18:2).

Italy was the destination of the prisoner Paul when he made his appeal to Caesar (Acts 27:1). The narrative of his journey from point to point-Caesarea, Myra, Melita, Puteoli, and then overland by the oldest and most famous of Roman roads, the Via Appia-illustrates the fact that ‘most of the realms of the ancient Roman Empire had better connections than ever afterwards or even now.’ Dangers could not be wholly avoided, but ‘travelling … was easy, swift, and secure to a degree unknown until the beginning of the nineteenth century’ (L. Friedländer, Roman Life and Manners under the Early Empire, 1908, i. 268).

In Hebrews 13:24 ‘they of Italy’ (οἱ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰταλίας) join the writer in sending salutations. οἱ ἀπό denotes persons who have come from the place indicated (cf. Matthew 15:1, Acts 6:9; Acts 10:23). It is a mistake to imagine that the writer was himself in Italy, and that he was thinking of the Italian Christians around him there. On the contrary, the phrase implies that the author was absent from and writing to Italy, while there were in his company natives of Italy who had embraced Christianity, and who desired to be remembered to their believing compatriots in some part of the home-land. It is not an equally safe, but still a plausible, conjecture that Italy-probably Rome-was the writer’s own home (see article Hebrews, Epistle to the).

James Strahan.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Anagni, Italy
An Italian episcopal town, in the province of Rome; native place of Pope Boniface VIII. On September 7, 1303, Nogaret and Sciarra Colonna, emissaries of Philip the Fair of France, at the head of several hundred soldiers, invaded the town where Boniface was then residing, plundered the papal palace, and offered all sorts of indignities to the pontiff who refused to abdicate or to convoke a general council. On September 9, the inhabitants drove away the sacrilegious invaders.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Italy
The well-known country, of which Rome was the capital. It is only incidentally mentioned in scripture. Acts 18:2 ; Acts 27:1,6 , Hebrews 13:24 .

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Italy
Abounding with calves or heifers
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Genoa, Italy, City of
(Italian: Genova)

City and former republic, Italy. An important seaport in ancient and medieval times, the republic enjoyed municipal freedom from 1339, when the first doge was elected, until 1797, but was always the center of strife and rebellion. Its first bishop was Saint Solomon, martyred, 269; first archbishop, Saint Dyrus, 1133. The city aided in the First Crusade, was the seat of a university founded by Bartolomeo Bianco (1471), was the home of Innocent IV and Adrian V, and the scene of several councils, in 733,1216, and 1292. It was the birth-place of Christopher Columbus. The churches of San Lorenzo, founded, 1100, Saint Catherine of Genoa, where the saint's body is preserved in a silver urn, Saints Cosmas and Damian, antedating 1000, and the Gesu Maria, erected in 1487, are some of the magnificent specimens of architecture which won for Genoa the title "La Superba" (the Proud).

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Genoa, Italy, Archdiocese of
Founded in the 3century as the diocese of Genoa. Elevated to an archdiocese of March 20, 1133. Suffragan dioceses include


Albenga-Imperia

Chiavari

La Spezia-Sarzana-Brugnato

Savona-Noli

Tortona

Ventimiglia-San Remo
Notable bishops include


Blessed James of Voragine

Blessed Tommaso Reggio

Cardinal Tommaso Pio Boggiani

Saint Birinus

Saint Syrus of Genoa

Saint Valentine of Genoa

Agostino Maria Salvago (1559 - 1567)

Airaldo Guaraco

Alessandro Centurione (1591 - 1596)

Andrea Caron † (29 Apr 1912Appointed - 22Jan 1915 Resigned)

Andrea della Torre (1368 - 1377)

Andreas Charvaz † (27 Sep 1852Appointed - 18 Oct 1870 Died)

Angelo Bagnasco, (August 29, 2006-incumbent)

Antonio Sauli (1586 - 1591)

Bartolomeo de' Maroni (1321 - 1335)

Bernardo de' Arimondi (1276 - 1287)

Bertrando Bessaduri (1349 - 1358)

Boniface (1188 - 1203)

Cardinal Carlo Dalmazio Minoretti † (16 Jan 1925 Appointed - 13Mar 1938 Died)

Cipriano Pallavicino (1567 - 1586)

Dino de' Tusci (1336 - 1342)

Diogenes (4th century)

Dionigi Tettamanzi (April 20, 1995-July 11, 2002)

Domenico de' Marini (1616 - 1635)

Edoardo Pulciano † (16 Nov 1901Appointed - 25 Dec 1911Died)

Francesco Sidoli † (1924Appointed - 18 Dec 1924Died)

Gerolamo Sauli (1550 - 1559)

Giacomo III Fieschi (1383 - 1400)

Giacomo Imperiale (1439 - 1452)

Giacomo Peloso da Santa Vittoria (1342 - 1349)

Giambattista Spínola (Sr.) † (10 Nov 1664Appointed - 17 Mark 1681Resigned)

Giorgio Costa (1495 - 1496)

Giorgio Fieschi (1436 - 1439)

Giosuè Signori † (21Nov 1921Appointed - 25 Nov 1923Died)

Giovanni Battista Spínola (1664 - 1681)

Giovanni Battista Spínola (1694 - 1705)

Giovanni Canestri (July 6, 1987-April 20, 1995)

Giovanni de' Rossi (1239 - 1252)

Giovanni Lercari † (10 Jul 1767 Appointed - 18 Mark 1802Died)

Giovanni Maria Sforza (1498 - 1520)

Giulio Vincenzo Gentile (1681 - 1694)

Giuseppe Maria Saporiti † (2Dec 1743Appointed - 14Apr 1767 Died)

Giuseppe Siri † (May 14, 1946 Appointed - 6 Jul 1987 Retired)

Giuseppe Spina † (May 24, 1802Appointed - 13Dec 1816 Resigned)

Giuseppe Vincenzo Airenti, O.P. † (5 Jul 1830 Appointed - 3Sep 1831Died)

Gualtiero da Vezzano (1253 - 1274)

Guido Scetten (1358 - 1368)

Innocenzo Cybo (1520 - 1550)

Lanfranco Sacco (1377 - 1382)

Lorenzo Fieschi † (May 18, 1705 Appointed - 25 Jun 1706 Installed, Cardinal-Priest of S. Maria della Pace)

Ludovico Gavotti † (22Jan 1915 Appointed - 23Dec 1918 Died)

Luigi Emmanuele Nicolo Lambruschini, B. † (3Sep 1819 Ordained Bishop - 26 Jun 1830 Resigned)

Matteo Rivarola (1596 - 1600)

Nicolò Maria de' Franchi (1726 - 1746)

Opizzino Fieschi (1288 - 1292)

Orazio Spínola † (20 Dec 1600 Appointed - 24Jun 1616 Died)

Ottone II Ghiglini (1203 - 1239)

Paolo Campofregoso (1453 - 1495)

Paolo Campofregoso (1496 - 1498)

Peitro Boetto, S.J. † (17 Mark 1938 Appointed - 31Jan 1946 Died)

Pietro (o Pietronzino) de' Giorgi (1433 - 1436)

Pietro Boetto, S.J. (March 17, 1938-January 31, 1946)

Pileo de' Marini (1400 - 1433)

Placido Maria Tadini, O.C.D. † (28 Oct 1831Appointed - 22Nov 1847 Died)

Porchetto Spinola (1299 - 1321)

Romulus of Genoa

Saint Salonius

Salvatore Magnasco † (27 Oct 1871Appointed - 12Jan 1892Died)

Siro de' Porcello (1133 - 1163)

Stefano Durazzo (1635 - 1664)

Tarcisio Bertone, S.D.B. (December 10, 2002-September 15, 2006)

Ugone della Volta (1163 - 1188)
See also


Catholic-Hierarchy.Org

archdiocese of Genoa

Google map

Catholic Encyclopedia

patron saints
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Italy
Acts 18:2 ; 27:1,6 ; Hebrews 13:24 ), like most geographical names, was differently used at different periods of history. As the power of Rome advanced, nations were successively conquered and added to it till it came to designate the whole country to the south of the Alps. There was constant intercourse between Palestine and Italy in the time of the Romans.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Siena, Italy, City of
City in Tuscany. The ancient city (Saena) was the center of a diocese in the 5th century. It was ruled in the 11th and 12th centuries by bishops who were also temporal lords of the surrounding country. A consular system was adopted in 1125, and from this time the history of the expanding republic is one of constantly changing government and continual strife. It was finally incorporated into Tuscany in 1557, and annexed to the kingdom of Italy in 1860. Gothic architecture produced in Siena its most excellent monuments, among which is the 13th-century cathedral containing numerous valuable paintings and sculptures. Siena was the home of the artists Duccio, Simone Martini (1285-1344), and the brothers Pisani; of the illustrious Gigli, and Cardinal Piccolomini; of many saints, including


Blessed Alda

Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena

Blessed Anna Maria Taigi

Saint Bernard Tolomeo

Blessed Bonaventure Tolomei

Saint Catherine of Siena

Blessed Francis Patrizzi

Saint Galganus

Blessed Joachim Piccolomini

Blessed John Colombini

Saint Rodolfo
The city is the seat of an archdiocese, and does, of course, have patron saints.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ravenna, Italy, City of
City of northern Italy. An important Roman city, it was the seat of a bishop, Saint Apollinaris, in the first century, and residence of the emperors in 404. From 568 to 752 it was under the rule of Byzantine governors or exarchs. After this period it was united to the dominions of the Holy See, annexed to Venice in 1438, part of the Cispadane Republic in 1797, and finally joined to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860. Among the many martyrs who suffered there were


Saint Agricola (305)

Saint Fusca (250)

Saint Maura (250)

Saint Ursicinus

Saint Vitalis
Ravenna is highly important in early Christian and Byzantine art. Besides the Church of Santi Nazario e Celso, dating from 440, there are San Apollinare Nuovo and San Vitale, both due to the Gothic King Theodoric's patronage of art, San Apollinare in Classe, and many others containing rare mosaics. The city is now the center of the archdiocese of Ravenna-Cervia.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ravenna-Cervia, Italy, Archdiocese of
Founded in the 1century, one of the earliest known dioceses. Elevated to an archdiocese in the 5th century. United with the diocese of Cervia, and name changed on February 22, 1947. Its bishops have included


Saint Apollinaris, 1century

Saint Liberius of Ravenna, 2century

Saint Adheritus, 2century

Saint Dathus, late 2century

Saint John Angeloptes, early 5th century

Saint Peter Chrysologus, 433 to 450

Saint John of Ravenna, late 5th century

Saint Damianus, 688

Saint Felix, 705

Saint Rinaldo, 1303

Blessed Guido Maria Conforti, 1902 to 1904
Suffragen dioceses include


Cesena-Sarsina

Forli-Bertinoro

Rimini

San Marino-Montefeltro
See also


Catholic-Hiearchy.Org

patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Siena-Colle di Val d'Elsa-Montalcino, Italy, Archd
Founded in the 4th century. Elevated to an archdiocese on April 23, 1459. Notable bishops and archbishops in its history include


Pope Eugene IV

Pope Pius II
Suffragen dioceses include


Grosseto

Massa Marittima-Piombino

Montepulciano-Chiusi-Pienza

Pitigliano-Sovana-Orbetello
See also


Catholic-Hierarchy.Org

archdiocese of Siena-Colle di Val d'Elsa-Montalcino - italiano
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Italy
Not mentioned in the Old Testament, unless under general terms, as Chittim, Isles of the sea. In the New Testament, Acts 18:2 27:1,6 Hebrews 13:24 , it is chiefly of interest on account of ROME, ROMANS, which see. The Italian band, mentioned in Acts 10:1 , was probably a Roman cohort from Italy, stationed at Cesarea; so called to distinguish it from the other troops, which were drawn from Syria and the adjacent regions.

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Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary - ... Name Meaning; ad, to; sumere, to take (latin) ... Patronage Acadians... Alezio, Italy... archdiocese of Seattle, Washington, USA... Arquata Scrivia, Piedmont, Italy... Bard, Aosta, Italy... Bolzano, Italy... Cajuns... Carentino, Piedmont, Italy... Casal Cermelli, Piedmont, Italy... Cerreto d'Esi, Ancona, Italy... Cistercian Order... Coniolo, Piedmont, Italy... Decollatura, Italy... diocese of Bathurst, Canada... diocese of Cheyenne, Wyoming, USA... diocese of Fall River, Massachusetts, USA... diocese of Fargo, North Dakota, USA... diocese of Galway and Kilmacduagh, Ireland... diocese of Greensburg, Pennsylvania, USA... diocese of San Fernando, Pampanga, Philippines... diocese of Trenton, New Jersey, USA... Etroubles, Aosta, Italy... Fabbrica Curone, Piedmont, Italy... fish dealers... fishmongers... France... French air crews... Ghaxaq, Malta... Guatemala... Guazzora, Piedmont, Italy... Gudja, Malta... Hal Ghaxaq, Malta... harness makers... Il-Gudja, Malta... Il-Mosta, Malta... India... Issogne, Aosta, Italy... Jamaica... Loro Ciuffenna, Arezzo, Italy... Maryland, USA... Moncestino, Piedmont, Italy... Montecastello, Piedmont, Italy... Montegioco, Piedmont, Italy... Morlupo, Italy... Mosta, Malta... Paraguay... Pian di Sco, Arezzo, Italy... Slovakia... South Africa... Stia, Arezzo, Italy... Trapani, Sicily, Italy... Trisobbio, Piedmont, Italy... Villeneuve, Aosta, Italy... Zia Indian Pueblo... Storefront Commercial Links related to Our Lady of the Assumption ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Of the Assumption of Mary, by Saint Alphonsus Maria de Liguori ...
Italian - Pertaining to Italy. A native of Italy. The language used in Italy, or by the Italians
Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - ... Patronage Alzano Scrivia, Italy... Belfiore, Italy... Belforte Monferrato, Italy... Bergamasco, Italy... Casasco, Italy... chefs... Citta Invicta, Malta... coffee house keepers... coffee house owners... cooks... distillers... drapers... fish dealers... fishmongers... Fornalutx, Spain... Fresonara, Italy... gold workers... goldsmiths... Loreto, Italy... needle makers... pin makers... potters... restauranteurs... Senglea, Malta... silk workers... silver workers... silversmiths... tile makers... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast of the - ... Patronage Alzano Scrivia, Italy... Belfiore, Italy... Belforte Monferrato, Italy... Bergamasco, Italy... Casasco, Italy... chefs... Citta Invicta, Malta... coffee house keepers... coffee house owners... cooks... distillers... drapers... fish dealers... fishmongers... Fornalutx, Spain... Fresonara, Italy... gold workers... goldsmiths... Loreto, Italy... needle makers... pin makers... potters... restauranteurs... Senglea, Malta... silk workers... silver workers... silversmiths... tile makers... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions
Alessandro di Troja - Profile Priest in the diocese of Lucera-Troia, Italy. ... Born October 29, 1801 in Lucera, Foggia, Italy ... Died January 31, 1834 in Lucera, Italy of natural causes ... Venerated pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Father Alessandro, contact... Diocesi di Lucera-Troia... P. za Duomo, 13... 71036 Lucera (FG), Italy ...
Troja, Alessandro di - Profile Priest in the diocese of Lucera-Troia, Italy. ... Born October 29, 1801 in Lucera, Foggia, Italy ... Died January 31, 1834 in Lucera, Italy of natural causes ... Venerated pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Father Alessandro, contact... Diocesi di Lucera-Troia... P. za Duomo, 13... 71036 Lucera (FG), Italy ...
Cavalieri, Bonaventura - (1598-1647) Hieronymite and mathematician, born Milan, Italy; died Bologna, Italy. He is renowned for his "Method of Indivisibles," the forerunner of, and since superseded by, integral calculus, and for his efforts in popularizing the use of logarithms in Italy
Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Feast of the Holy Cross - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Feast of the Triumph of the Cross - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Holy Cross, Feast of the - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Exaltation of the Holy Cross, Feast of the - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Triumph of the Cross, Feast of the - ... Patronage Anghiari, Italy... Buttapietra, Italy... Carrosio, Italy... Cassano Spinola, Italy... Cortona, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Veneration of the Cross ... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Eutychianus, Pope Saint - Born in Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Romuald, Saint - 950in Ravenna, Italy; died on June 19, 1027 in Val-di-Castro, Italy. For almost thirty years he traveled about Italy, reforming monasteries and establishing hermitages. Relics at Fabriano, Italy
Leopoldo Nobili - Born 1784 in Trassilico, Italy; died 1835 in Florence, Italy
Nobili, Leopoldo - Born 1784 in Trassilico, Italy; died 1835 in Florence, Italy
Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart - Order founded by Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini, in the province of Milan, Italy, 1880, for the spread of the devotion to the Heart of Jesus by the practise of corporal and spiritual works of mercy. The order includes colleges, schools, nurseries, orphanages, and hospitals, in Italy, France, Spain, England, United States, Argentina, Brazil, Nicaragua, and China. The mother-house is in Rome, Italy
Giovanni Scaramelli - Born in Rome, Italy in 1687; died in Macerata, Italy in 1752
Scaramelli, Giovanni Battista - Born in Rome, Italy in 1687; died in Macerata, Italy in 1752
Mazzella, Camillo - Born Vitulamo, near Benevento, Italy, 1833; died Rome, Italy, 1900. Expelled with his order from Italy, he taught theology at Fourvieres, and at Georgetown University, Washington
Camillo Mazzella - Born Vitulamo, near Benevento, Italy, 1833; died Rome, Italy, 1900. Expelled with his order from Italy, he taught theology at Fourvieres, and at Georgetown University, Washington
Nicholas Iii, Pope - 1216at Rome, Italy; died on August 22, 1280 at Soriano, Italy. While pope he attempted to free Rome from foreign influence, and to check the Angevins in central Italy
Giovanni Orsini - 1216at Rome, Italy; died on August 22, 1280 at Soriano, Italy. While pope he attempted to free Rome from foreign influence, and to check the Angevins in central Italy
Giovanni Perrone - Jesuit theologian, born Chieri, Italy, 1794; died Rome, Italy, 1876
Giovanni Pichler - Born in Naples, Italy in 1734; died Rome, Italy, 1791
Macedonio Melloni - Born April 11, 1798 at Parma, Italy; died August 11, 1854 at Portici, Italy
Tommaso Boggiani - Prior of the Dominican convent at Ragusa, Sicily, Italy in 1891. Parish priest at Santa Maria di Castello, Genoa, Italy in 1900. Apostolic administrator of Adria, Italy in 1908. Bishop of Adria, Italy on October 16, 1908. Apostolic Administrator of Genoa, Italy on March 7, 1914. ... Born January 19, 1863 at Boscomarengo, Alessandria, Italy as Pio Boggiani ... Died February 26, 1942 of natural causes ...
Celestine iv, Pope - Born in Milan, Italy as Gofredo Castiglioni; died on October 5, 1241 in Rome, Italy
Gofredo Castiglioni - Born in Milan, Italy as Gofredo Castiglioni; died on October 5, 1241 in Rome, Italy
Otto ii, Emperor - Roman emperor and German king; born 955; died at Rome, Italy on December 7, 983. He inaugurated an extravagant policy of imperialism, in which Germany and Italy were to wield the balance of power. Otto next entered Italy and saved the papacy from the oppression of the Roman faction headed by Crescentius; he then captured Tarentum, but his defeat near Capo Colonne cost him Apulia and Calabria, and ruined the imperial prestige in Lower Italy. Returning to Italy to avenge his defeat, he died of malaria
Marchi, Giuseppe - Jesuit archaeologist, born Tolmezzo, Italy, 1795; died Rome, Italy, 1860
Florentine - ) Belonging or relating to Florence, in Italy. ) A native or inhabitant of Florence, a city in Italy
Giuseppe Marchi - Jesuit archaeologist, born Tolmezzo, Italy, 1795; died Rome, Italy, 1860
Ballerini, Antonio - (1805-1881) Jesuit canonist, born Medicina, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Bernardine of Feltre, Blessed - Born Feltre, Italy, 1439; died Pavia, Italy, 1494. Joining the Franciscans in 1456, he was ordained a priest, 1463, taught in Franciscan schools, and began his missionary labors throughout the larger cities of Italy
Lando, Pope - Born in Sabina, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Landus, Pope - Born in Sabina, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Attala, Saint - Abbot (died 627), born Burgundy; died at Bobbio, Italy. Relics at Bobbio, Italy
Leo v, Pope - Born in Priapi, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Aloysius Gonzaga, Saint - Confessor born Castiglione, Italy, 1568; died Rome, Italy, 1591. Returning to Italy, he renounced his inheritance in favor of his brother, and entered the Society of Jesus, 1585. In 1591, when famine and pestilence spread through Italy, he devoted himself to the care of the sick, was stricken, and died
Gonzaga, Aloysius, Saint - Confessor born Castiglione, Italy, 1568; died Rome, Italy, 1591. Returning to Italy, he renounced his inheritance in favor of his brother, and entered the Society of Jesus, 1585. In 1591, when famine and pestilence spread through Italy, he devoted himself to the care of the sick, was stricken, and died
Leonard of Port Maurice, Saint - Confessor, missionary and ascetic writer, born Porto Maurizio, Italy, 1676; died Rome, Italy, 1751. A pupil of the Jesuits, he entered the Riformella, a branch of the Franciscans, 1697, and spent his life giving missions in Tuscany, Central and Southern Italy, and Corsica, which were crowned with wonderful success
Adrian v, Pope - Born at Genoa, Italy as Ottobuono Fieschi; died on August 18, 1276 in Viterbo, Italy
Fieschi, Ottobuono - Born at Genoa, Italy as Ottobuono Fieschi; died on August 18, 1276 in Viterbo, Italy
Ottobuono Fieschi - Born at Genoa, Italy as Ottobuono Fieschi; died on August 18, 1276 in Viterbo, Italy
Andrew the Scot, Saint - Archdeacon of Fiesole, born Ireland; died Italy, c877 He was a brother of Saint Bridget the Younger, and accompanied Donatus to Italy, becoming Archdeacon of Fiesole, where he restored the church of Saint Martin and founded a monastery
Alessandro Volta - Born on February 18, 1745 at Como, Italy; died on March 5, 1827 at Como, Italy
Scot, Andrew the, Saint - Archdeacon of Fiesole, born Ireland; died Italy, c877 He was a brother of Saint Bridget the Younger, and accompanied Donatus to Italy, becoming Archdeacon of Fiesole, where he restored the church of Saint Martin and founded a monastery
Regular Clerks of the Congregation of Saint Paul - Founded in Milan, Italy in 1530, by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria, Barthelemy Ferrari, and Jacopo Morigia, with the special object of reviving zeal among the clergy. They preach, catechize, shrive, give missions, administer the sacraments, and educate the young in Italy, Austria, France, Czechoslovakia, Belgium, Malta, China, and Brazil
Elena Lucrezia Piscopia Cornaro - Writer, born Venice, Italy, 1646; died Padua, Italy, 1684
Matteo Colombo - (1516-1559) Anatomist and discoverer of the pulmonary circulation, born Cremona, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Oriani, Barnaba - Born in Carignano, Italy in 1752; died in Milan, Italy in 1832
Barnaba Oriani - Born in Carignano, Italy in 1752; died in Milan, Italy in 1832
Adrian Iii, Pope - Born in either Teano or Rome, Italy; died near Modena, Italy
Vernage - ) A kind of sweet wine from Italy
Parmesan - ) Of or pertaining to Parma in Italy
Frangipani, Lando Dei - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Innocent Iii, Anti-Pope - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Lando Dei Frangipani - Anti-pope 1179-1180; born Italy; died monastery of La Cava. Cardinal Hugo captured him in his castle at Palombara, Italy, and shut him up for life in the monastery of La Cava
Leopoldo Caldani - Catholic anatomist and physiologist, born Bologna, Italy, 1725; died Padua, Italy, 1813
John vi, Pope - Born in Greece; died in Rome, Italy. During his pontificate he secured a cessation of Lombard attacks upon different parts of Italy
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio - Catholic anatomist and physiologist, born Bologna, Italy, 1725; died Padua, Italy, 1813
Celestine ii, Pope - Born in Tuscany, Italy as Guido del Castello; died in Rome, Italy
Guido Del Castello - Born in Tuscany, Italy as Guido del Castello; died in Rome, Italy
John x, Pope - Born in Tossignano, Italy; died at Rome, Italy. An active and energetic ruler he crowned Emperor Berengarius, 915; endeavored to end the Saracenic invasions; sought to bring the Slavs of Dalmatia into closer union with Rome; and was active in ecclesiastic and political affairs in Italy, Germany, and France
Anna Maria Taigi, Blessed - (1769-1837) Born Siena, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Siennese - ) Of or pertaining to Sienna, a city of Italy
Flavio Biondo - (1388-1463) Catholic archaeologist and historian, born Forli, Italy; died Rome, Italy
John Xiv, Pope - Reigned from 983 to 984) Born in Pavia, Italy as Peter Campanora; died in Rome, Italy
Biondo, Flavio - (1388-1463) Catholic archaeologist and historian, born Forli, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Campanora, Peter - Reigned from 983 to 984) Born in Pavia, Italy as Peter Campanora; died in Rome, Italy
Anthony Zaccaria, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Barnabites, born Cremona, Italy, 1502; died there, 1539. He worked among the poor at Milan, and established the Confraternity of Eternal Wisdom and the congregation of secular clergy to relieve the conditions in northern Italy
Rieti, Colomba of, Blessed - (1467-1501) Virgin, Dominican tertiary, born Rieti, Italy; died Perugia, Italy
Zaccaria, Anthony, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Barnabites, born Cremona, Italy, 1502; died there, 1539. He worked among the poor at Milan, and established the Confraternity of Eternal Wisdom and the congregation of secular clergy to relieve the conditions in northern Italy
Allipoli Oil - An inferior kind of olive oil, brought from Gallipoli, in Italy
Falernian - ) Of or pertaining to Mount Falernus, in Italy; as, Falernianwine
Rhegium - A city of Italy mentioned in Paul's travels
Bernardine of Siena, Saint - Confessor, the apostle of Italy, born Massa, Italy, 1380; died Aquila, Italy, 1444
Alaric - 370-410) King of the Visigoths, born on an island in the Danube; died Cosenza, Italy. He overran Italy, 400, but was forced by Stilicho to retire to IIIyricum, 403. He married Galla Placida at Narbo, 417, became master of Italy, and was about to invade Africa when he died
Siena, Bernardine of, Saint - Confessor, the apostle of Italy, born Massa, Italy, 1380; died Aquila, Italy, 1444
Dante Alighieri - Poet, born Florence, Italy, 1265; died Ravenna, Italy, 1321. In 1309, in anticipation of the visit to Italy of Emperor Henry VII, he wrote his famous treatise on the monarchy "De Monarchia" and in 1317, having settled at Ravenna, completed hig masterpiece, the "Divina Commedia," an allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the world beyond the grave, Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, written with the avowed object of converting a corrupt society. It is the last book of the Middle Ages, epitomizes the knowledge and attainments of the preceding centuries, and gives a picture of Catholicism in 13th-century Italy
Alighieri, Dante - Poet, born Florence, Italy, 1265; died Ravenna, Italy, 1321. In 1309, in anticipation of the visit to Italy of Emperor Henry VII, he wrote his famous treatise on the monarchy "De Monarchia" and in 1317, having settled at Ravenna, completed hig masterpiece, the "Divina Commedia," an allegory of human life in the form of a vision of the world beyond the grave, Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, written with the avowed object of converting a corrupt society. It is the last book of the Middle Ages, epitomizes the knowledge and attainments of the preceding centuries, and gives a picture of Catholicism in 13th-century Italy
Centesimo - ) A copper coin of Italy and Spain equivalent to a centime
Cremona - ) A superior kind of violin, formerly made at Cremona, in Italy
Donna - ) A lady; madam; mistress; - the title given a lady in Italy
Lately - ) Not long ago; recently; as, he has lately arrived from Italy
Felix ii - Born in Rome, Italy; died Porto, Italy, in 365
Ambrose of Siena, Blessed - Dominican; born Sansedoni, near Siena, Italy, 1220; died Siena, Italy, 1286
Alexander Sauli, Saint - Born in 1533 in Milan, Italy; died on October 11, 1592 in Pavia, Italy
Latian - ) Belonging, or relating, to Latium, a country of ancient Italy
John i, Pope Saint - Born in Tuscany, Italy; died in Ravenna, Italy. He was obliged by Theodoric, King of the Ostrogoths and of Italy, to head an embassy sent by Theodoric to Constantinople, 525, to secure a mitigation in the persecution of the Arians
Manutius, Aldus - Scholar and printer, born Bassiano, near Velletri, Italy, 1450; died Venice, Italy, 1515
Athanasius, Saint 15 Jul - Confessor (died 872), Bishop of Naples; born Naples, Italy; died Veroli, Italy
Sisters of Providence - A house for novices and a training school for sisters was established at Domodossola, Italy. The congregation has houses, including schools, in Italy, England, and Wales
Sisters of the Institute of Charity (Rosminians) - A house for novices and a training school for sisters was established at Domodossola, Italy. The congregation has houses, including schools, in Italy, England, and Wales
Latin - Pertaining to the Latins, a people of Latium, in Italy Roman as the Latin language. ... Latin church, the western church the christian church in Italy, France, Spain and other countries where the Latin language was introduced, as distinct from the Greek or eastern church
Apennine - ) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the Apennines, a chain of mountains extending through Italy
Dreibund - , the alliance of Germany, Austria, and Italy, formed in 1882
Comitiva - ) A body of followers; - applied to the lawless or brigand bands in Italy and Sicily
Rubicon - ) A small river which separated Italy from Cisalpine Gaul, the province alloted to Julius Caesar
Francis de Geronimo, Saint - Confessor, apostle of Naples; born Grottaglie, Italy, 1642; died Naples, Italy, 1716
Agnes of Assisi, Saint - (Greek: agnos, lamb) ... Born Assisi, Italy, c. From there she established several monasteries in the north of Italy
Anthony Baldinucci, Blessed - Born on June 19, 1665 in Florence, Italy; died on November 6, 1717. He labored in the neighborhood of Frascati and Viterbo, Italy, his work being characterized by processions, during which Anthony and many of his flock scourged themselves with disciplines; his success was largely due to his propagation of devotion to the Blessed Virgin, whose image was always carried before him on his missions
Antonio da Sangallo, the Elder - Born in Florence, Italy in 1455; died there in 1534. He later erected the church of Madonna di San Biagio at Montepulciano, one of the handsomest in Italy, as well as many splendid palaces, and became chief engineer of the fortifications of Florence
Geronimo, Francis de, Saint - Confessor, apostle of Naples; born Grottaglie, Italy, 1642; died Naples, Italy, 1716
Baldinucci, Anthony, Blessed - Born on June 19, 1665 in Florence, Italy; died on November 6, 1717. He labored in the neighborhood of Frascati and Viterbo, Italy, his work being characterized by processions, during which Anthony and many of his flock scourged themselves with disciplines; his success was largely due to his propagation of devotion to the Blessed Virgin, whose image was always carried before him on his missions
Sangalo, Antonio da, the Elder - Born in Florence, Italy in 1455; died there in 1534. He later erected the church of Madonna di San Biagio at Montepulciano, one of the handsomest in Italy, as well as many splendid palaces, and became chief engineer of the fortifications of Florence
Suidger - Born in Saxony, Germany as Suidger; died near Pesaro, Italy. " He opened his short pontificate with reform measures attacking simony, and died on the way to Rome from a triumphal tour of southern Italy with Henry
Society of the Holy Child Jesus - The society includes schools, academies, and one college in England, France, Switzerland, Italy, and the United States. The mother-house is in Rome, Italy
Pellagra - ) An erythematous affection of the skin, with severe constitutional and nervous symptoms, endemic in Northern Italy
Lately - We called on a gentleman who has lately arrived from Italy
Domenichino Zampieri - Painter, born Bologna, Italy, 1581; died Naples, Italy, 1641
Domenico Zampieri - Painter, born Bologna, Italy, 1581; died Naples, Italy, 1641
Cardan, Girolamo - (Cardano, Girolamo) (1501-1576) Physician and mathematician, born Pavia, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Cardano, Girolamo - (Cardano, Girolamo) (1501-1576) Physician and mathematician, born Pavia, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Girolamo Cardan - (Cardano, Girolamo) (1501-1576) Physician and mathematician, born Pavia, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Girolamo Cardano - (Cardano, Girolamo) (1501-1576) Physician and mathematician, born Pavia, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Andrea, Giovanni d' - Canonist, born near Florence, Italy c. 1275;died Bologna, Italy, 1348
Zampieri, Domenichino - Painter, born Bologna, Italy, 1581; died Naples, Italy, 1641
Zampieri, Domenico - Painter, born Bologna, Italy, 1581; died Naples, Italy, 1641
Etrurian - ) Of or relating to ancient Etruria, in Italy
Bologna - ) A city of Italy which has given its name to various objects
Assam, British India, Prefecture Apostolic of - Comprises the provinces of Assam, Bhutan, and Manipur; established, 1889; entrusted to the Salesians of Don Bosco (Turin, Italy)
Innocent Vii, Pope - 1336at Sulmona, Italy at Cosimo de' Migliorati; died on November 6, 1406 at Rome, Italy. Bishop of Bologna, Italy
Johann Pichler - Born Brixen, Austria in 1697; died Rome, Italy in 1779
Bergomask - ) A rustic dance, so called in ridicule of the people of Bergamo, in Italy, once noted for their clownishness
Pozzolana - ) Volcanic ashes from Pozzuoli, in Italy, used in the manufacture of a kind of mortar which hardens under water
Ferrarese - ) Pertaining to Ferrara, in Italy
Malpighi, Marcello - Born Crevalcore, Italy, March 10, 1628; died Rome, Italy, November 29, 1694
Marcello Malpighi - Born Crevalcore, Italy, March 10, 1628; died Rome, Italy, November 29, 1694
John ix, Pope - Born in Tivoli, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Lucius ii, Pope - Born in Bologna, Italy as Gherardo Caccianemici dal Orbo; died Rome, Italy
Goldwell, Thomas - 1501;died Rome, Italy, 1585. He was Cardinal Pole's secretary, and went into exile with him to Italy, in 1538
Bayma, Joseph - (1816-1892) Mathematician and scientist, born Piedmont, Italy; died Santa Clara, California. Exiled from Italy in 1860, he took refuge at Stonyhurst, England, where he wrote his Realis Philosophia
Sabina, Saint - (Latin: Sabine) ... Martyr in 126 in Rome, Italy. She was a wealthy widow of Umbria in Italy, converted to Christianity by her servant Serapia, who was martyred for her faith
Sisters of the Divine Saviour - A congregation founded in Rome, Italy in 1888 by Father John Baptist Jordan to supplement the work of the Salvatorian Fathers. The mother-house is in Rome, and they are established in Italy, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Belgium, and China
Thomas Goldwell - 1501;died Rome, Italy, 1585. He was Cardinal Pole's secretary, and went into exile with him to Italy, in 1538
Silverius, Pope Saint - Born in Rome; died in Palmaria, Italy. His innocence established, he returned to Italy, only to be exiled once more
Gherardo Caccianemici Dal Orbo - Born in Bologna, Italy as Gherardo Caccianemici dal Orbo; died Rome, Italy
Sabinian, Pope - Born in Blera (Bieda), Italy; died on February 22, 606 in Rome, Italy
Anastasius Iii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Majolica - ) A kind of pottery, with opaque glazing and showy, which reached its greatest perfection in Italy in the 16th century
Caroline - ) A silver coin once current in some parts of Italy, worth about seven cents
Veronese - ) Of or pertaining to Verona, in Italy
Guibert of Ravenna - Antipope (1080,1084-1100) Born Parma, Italy, c. 1025;died Civita, Castellana, Italy. He was imperial chancellor for Italy, 1057-1063; helped secure the election of the anti-pope Cadalous, and accepted the Archbishopric of Ravenna to which he had been nominated by Henry IV
Ravenna, Guibert of - Antipope (1080,1084-1100) Born Parma, Italy, c. 1025;died Civita, Castellana, Italy. He was imperial chancellor for Italy, 1057-1063; helped secure the election of the anti-pope Cadalous, and accepted the Archbishopric of Ravenna to which he had been nominated by Henry IV
Palladio, Andrea - Architect; born Vicenza, Italy, 1508; died Venice, Italy, 1580
Innocent ix, Pope - Born on July 22, 1519 at Bologna, Italy as Giovanni Antonio Facchinetti; died in Rome, Italy on December 30, 1591
Merici, Angela, Saint - Virgin, foundress of the Ursulines, born Desenzano, Italy, 1474; died Brescia, Italy, 1540
Mariscotti, Hyacintha, Saint - Virgin, Franciscan tertiary and foundress of the Sacconi, born Vignanello, Italy, 1585; died Viterbo, Italy, 1640
Adramyttium - He was conveyed in it only to Myra, in Lycia, whence he sailed in an Alexandrian ship to Italy. It was a rare thing for a ship to sail from any port of Palestine direct for Italy
Bellini, Gentile - Painter, born Padua, Italy, c. 1427;died Venice, Italy, 1507
Hyacintha Mariscotti, Saint - Virgin, Franciscan tertiary and foundress of the Sacconi, born Vignanello, Italy, 1585; died Viterbo, Italy, 1640
Andrea Palladio - Architect; born Vicenza, Italy, 1508; died Venice, Italy, 1580
Angela Merici, Saint - Virgin, foundress of the Ursulines, born Desenzano, Italy, 1474; died Brescia, Italy, 1540
Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - The society has houses, colleges, academies, elementary and high schools, in Italy, France, Belgium, England, Ireland, Scotland, the Netherlands, Spain, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Poland, the United States, Canada, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Argentine, Uruguay, Brazil, Colombia, Egypt, Congo, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and China. The mother-house is in Rome, Italy
Carthusian Nuns - A few convents in France, Belgium, and Italy, have been affiliated with the Carthusian Order since the 12th century, following a similar rule
Nuns, Carthusian - A few convents in France, Belgium, and Italy, have been affiliated with the Carthusian Order since the 12th century, following a similar rule
Atellan - ) Of or pertaining to Atella, in ancient Italy; as, Atellan plays; farcical; ribald
Sabine - ) Of or pertaining to the ancient Sabines, a people of Italy
Italian Band - The name of the Roman cohort to which Cornelius belonged (Acts 10:1 ), so called probably because it consisted of men recruited in Italy
Fallopio, Gabriello - Catholic anatomist, born Modena, Italy, 1523; died Padua, Italy, 1562
Francis Caracciolo, Saint - Confessor, co-founder of the Congregation of the Minor Clerks Regular, born Abruzzo, Italy, 1563; died Agnone, Italy, 1608
Savonarola, Girolamo - Born on September 21, 1452 in Ferrara, Italy; died on May 23, 1498 in F!orence, Italy
Girolamo Savonarola - Born on September 21, 1452 in Ferrara, Italy; died on May 23, 1498 in F!orence, Italy
Fra Bartolommeo - Painter, born Soffignano, Italy, March 28, 1472; died Florence, Italy, October 31, 1517
Girolamo Masci - Born on September 30, 1227 in Ascoli, Italy as Girolamo Masci; died on April 4, 1292 in Rome, Italy
Caracciolo, Francis, Saint - Confessor, co-founder of the Congregation of the Minor Clerks Regular, born Abruzzo, Italy, 1563; died Agnone, Italy, 1608
Nicholas iv, Pope - Born on September 30, 1227 in Ascoli, Italy as Girolamo Masci; died on April 4, 1292 in Rome, Italy
Masci, Girolamo - Born on September 30, 1227 in Ascoli, Italy as Girolamo Masci; died on April 4, 1292 in Rome, Italy
Gabriello Fallopio - Catholic anatomist, born Modena, Italy, 1523; died Padua, Italy, 1562
Guido Reni - Born in November 4, 1575 at Calvenzano, Italy; died in Bologna, Italy on August 18, 1642
Bartolommeo di Pagholo Del Fattorino - Painter, born Soffignano, Italy, March 28, 1472; died Florence, Italy, October 31, 1517
Bartolommeo, Fra - Painter, born Soffignano, Italy, March 28, 1472; died Florence, Italy, October 31, 1517
Reni, Guido - Born in November 4, 1575 at Calvenzano, Italy; died in Bologna, Italy on August 18, 1642
Benedict iv, Pope - 900to c903Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Italian Band - It was doubtless so called because of the men being recruited in Italy
Venetian - ) Of or pertaining to Venice in Italy
Oscan - ) Of or pertaining to the Osci, a primitive people of Campania, a province of ancient Italy
Mantua - ) A superior kind of rich silk formerly exported from Mantua in Italy
Camorra - ) A secret organization formed at Naples, Italy, early in the 19th century, and used partly for political ends and partly for practicing extortion, violence, etc
Della Crusca - A shortened form of Accademia della Crusca, an academy in Florence, Italy, founded in the 16th century, especially for conserving the purity of the Italian language
Finochio - The blanched stems are used in France and Italy as a culinary vegetable
Enoese - ) Of or pertaining to Genoa, a city of Italy
Milanese - ) Of or pertaining to Milan in Italy, or to its inhabitants
Doria, Andrea - Admiral and statesman, born Oneglia, Italy, 1468; died Genoa, Italy, 1560
Joseph of Cupertino, Saint - Confessor, mystic, born Cupertino, Italy, 1603; died Osimo, Italy, 1663
Odoric of Pordenone, Blessed - Franciscan missionary; born Villanova near Pordenone, Friuli, Italy, 1286; died Udine, Italy, 1331
Menochio, Giovanni Stefano - Born Padua, Italy, 1575; died Rome, Italy, February 4, 1655
Niccolo Sfondrati - Born in Somma, Italy on February 11, 1535; died in Rome, Italy on October 16, 1591
Marcello Cervini Degli Spannochi - Born on May 6, 1501 in Montepulciano, Italy; died in Rome, Italy on May 6, 1555
Marcellus ii, Pope - Born on May 6, 1501 in Montepulciano, Italy; died in Rome, Italy on May 6, 1555
Orlando Bandinelli - 1100in Siena, Italy as Orlando Bandinelli; died Civita Castellana, Italy
John Gualbert, Saint - Abbot, founder of the monastery of Vallombrosa, born Florence, Italy, c. 985;died Passignano, Italy, 1073
Bedini, Cajetan - (1806-1864) Cardinal and diplomat, born Sinigaglia, Italy; died Viterbo, Italy
Gualbert, John, Saint - Abbot, founder of the monastery of Vallombrosa, born Florence, Italy, c. 985;died Passignano, Italy, 1073
Andrea Doria - Admiral and statesman, born Oneglia, Italy, 1468; died Genoa, Italy, 1560
Agostino Ciasca - Augustinian cardinal, born in 1835 in Polignano a Mare, Italy; died in 1902 in Rome, Italy
Giovanni Menochio - Born Padua, Italy, 1575; died Rome, Italy, February 4, 1655
Gregory Xiv, Pope - Born in Somma, Italy on February 11, 1535; died in Rome, Italy on October 16, 1591
Gregory Viii, Pope - 1100in Benevento, Italy as Alberto di Morra; died at Pisa, Italy
Gaetano Sanseverino - Restorer of the Scholastic philosophy in Italy. Born in 1811 in Naples, Italy; died there of cholera on November 16, 1865
Bartolomeo Platina - Humanist; born in 1421 in Piadena, Italy; died in 1481 in Rome, Italy
Albornoz, Gil Alvarez Carillo de - 1310-1367) Archbishop of Toledo, cardinal, general, and statesman, born Cuenca, New Castile; died near Viterbo, Italy. Having led an army to Italy he regained the Papal States for the pope, 1354, but refused the tiara after the death of Innocent VI
Alexander Iii, Pope - 1100in Siena, Italy as Orlando Bandinelli; died Civita Castellana, Italy
Sfondrati, Niccolo - Born in Somma, Italy on February 11, 1535; died in Rome, Italy on October 16, 1591
Bandinelli, Orlando - 1100in Siena, Italy as Orlando Bandinelli; died Civita Castellana, Italy
Santini, Giovanni Sante Gasparo - Born in 1787 in Caprese, Italy; died in 1877 in Padua, Italy
Sanseverino, Gaetano - Restorer of the Scholastic philosophy in Italy. Born in 1811 in Naples, Italy; died there of cholera on November 16, 1865
Francesco Grimaldi - Born Bologna, Italy, 1613; died there, 1663
Hibelline - ) One of a faction in Italy, in the 12th and 13th centuries, which favored the German emperors, and opposed the Guelfs, or adherents of the poses
Latin - (la' tihn) Language of ancient Italy and the Roman Empire and thus one of languages in which the inscription over Christ's cross was written (John 19:20 )
Grimaldi, Francesco Maria - Born Bologna, Italy, 1613; died there, 1663
Myra - Seaport of Lycia, in Asia Minor, where Paul and those with him embarked on a ship sailing to Italy
Latin - (la' tihn) Language of ancient Italy and the Roman Empire and thus one of languages in which the inscription over Christ's cross was written (John 19:20 )
Italo-Greeks - A group of about 50,000 Byzantine Uniats scattered in southern Italy and its islands, with about 20,000 immigrants in the United States. They comprise the, original Greek-speaking inhabitants of southern Italy, which was withdrawn from the jurisdiction of Rome and given to the Patriarch of Constantinople by Emperor Leo the Isaurian in 726. In 1467,1566, and 1740 the immigration of the Albanians into lower Italy encouraged those who still clung to the Byzantine Rite
Ludovisi, Alessandro - Born in Bologna, Italy in 1554 as Alessandro Ludovisi; died in Rome, Italy on July 18, 1623. War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Gregory xv, Pope - Born in Bologna, Italy in 1554 as Alessandro Ludovisi; died in Rome, Italy on July 18, 1623. War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Alessandro Ludovisi - Born in Bologna, Italy in 1554 as Alessandro Ludovisi; died in Rome, Italy on July 18, 1623. War in the Valtelline, Italy, was averted when Gregory's army seized possession of it before Spain and Austria could open hostilities, and held it until its status was settled
Podesta - ) A mayor, alderman, or other magistrate, in some towns of Italy
Carbonaro - ) A member of a secret political association in Italy, organized in the early part of the nineteenth centry for the purpose of changing the government into a republic
Galgani, Gemma - Born Camigliano, Italy, 1878; died Lucca, 1903
Ferrara - ) A sword bearing the mark of one of the Ferrara family of Italy
Pompeian - ) Of, pertaining to, or characteristic of, Pompeii, an ancient city of Italy, buried by an eruption of Vesuvius in 79 a
Gemma Galgani - Born Camigliano, Italy, 1878; died Lucca, 1903
Denza, Francesco - Did notable photographic research on the heavenly bodies, was instrumental in establishing over 200 meteorological stations in Italy, and rebuilt the Vatican observatory for that purpose
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista - Born February 25, 1682 at Forti, Italy; died December 6, 1771
Maldonado, Juan - Jesuit theologian and exegete, born Casas de Reina, Spain, 1533; died Rome, Italy, 1583
Juan Maldonado - Jesuit theologian and exegete, born Casas de Reina, Spain, 1533; died Rome, Italy, 1583
Rhegium - Breach, a town in the south of Italy, on the Strait of Messina, at which Paul touched on his way to Rome (Acts 28:13 )
Giovanni Morgagni - Born February 25, 1682 at Forti, Italy; died December 6, 1771
Mai, Angelo - Born Schilpario, Italy, 1782; died Albano, Italy, 1854
Berchmans, John, Saint - Confessor, born Diest, Brabant, 1599; died Rome, Italy, 1621. Relics in San Ignazio, Rome, Italy
John Berchmans, Saint - Confessor, born Diest, Brabant, 1599; died Rome, Italy, 1621. Relics in San Ignazio, Rome, Italy
Damian, Peter, Saint - Doctor of the Church; Cardinal Bishop of Ostia; born Ravenna, Italy, 1007; died Faenza, Italy, 1072
Innocent Xii, Pope - Born in Spinazzolo, Italy in 1615 as Antonio Pignatelli; died in Rome, Italy
Innocent i, Pope Saint - Born Albano, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Innocent Viii, Pope - Born in Genoa, Italy, in 1432 as Giovanni Battista Cibò; died in Rome, Italy on July 25, 1492
Francis Crawford - Writer, born Bagni di Lucca, Italy, 1854; died Sorrento, Italy, 1909
Celestine v, Saint, Pope - Born in Isernia, Italy, in 1215 as Pietro de Murbone; died near Anagni, Italy, in May 19, 1296
Adramyttium - The centurion escorting Paul took an Adramyttian ship, as a vessel going the whole way from Palestine to Italy was hard to find, and as it would bring them so far on their journey toward Rome, and in that coast they would be likely to find another ship to take them the rest of the way. At Myra in Lycia accordingly they found an Alexandrian ship bound for Italy
Giorgio Giorgione - Painter, born Castelfranco, Italy, c. 1476;died Venice, Italy, 1510
Giorgione, Giorgio Barbarelli - Painter, born Castelfranco, Italy, c. 1476;died Venice, Italy, 1510
Baptistines - 1755,to hold missions in Rome and Italy. ...

Hermit Sisters of Saint John the Baptist, founded in Genoa by Giovanna Solimani, 1730, cloistered and very rigorous in discipline, now maintaining several convents in Italy
Angelo Mai - Born Schilpario, Italy, 1782; died Albano, Italy, 1854
Alexander iv, Pope - Born in Anagni, France as Rinaldo Conti; died on March 25, 1261 in Viterbo, Italy. Rome and a large portion of Italy were lost to papal control during his reign
Adrian i, Pope - Founder of the temporal power of the popes; born in Rome, Italy; died there. Elected when the Lombards were threatening to dominate all Italy, he summoned Charlemagne to assist him in averting this catastrophe, and the result of his appeal was the Donation of Charlemagne, for eleven centuries the basis of the temporal sovereignty of the popes
Alexander Vii, Pope - Born on February 13, 1599 in Siena, Italy as Fabio Chigi; died in Rome, Italy on May 22, 1667
Tomacelli, Pietro - 1356at Naples, Italy as Pietro Tomacelli; died on October 1, 1404 at Rome, Italy
Adria - The term 'Adriatic' is now confined to the sea that lies between Italy and Dalmatia and Albania; but formerly it had a wider signification and included that part of the Mediterranean which was bounded by Sicily, Italy, Greece and Africa
Benedict i, Pope - He reigned during the famine which followed upon a Lombard invasion of Italy, and died during a siege of Rome
Aul - ) The Anglicized form of Gallia, which in the time of the Romans included France and Upper Italy (Transalpine and Cisalpine Gaul)
Pinole - ) An aromatic powder used in Italy in the manufacture of chocolate
Leo Vii, Pope - Born and died in Rome, Italy
Padre - ) A Christian priest or monk; - used in Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Spanish America
Stigmatine Fathers - The congregation has its mother-house at Rome and is represented in Italy, North and South America, and China
Rhegium - City on the coast of Italy, near its south-east extremity
Johann Franzelin - Cardinal and theologian, born Aldein, Tyrol, 1816; died Rome, Italy, 1886
Franzelin, Johann Baptist - Cardinal and theologian, born Aldein, Tyrol, 1816; died Rome, Italy, 1886
Averroist - ) One of a sect of peripatetic philosophers, who appeared in Italy before the restoration of learning; so denominated from Averroes, or Averrhoes, a celebrated Arabian philosopher
Faustinus, Saint - 120), died Brescia, Italy
Jovita, Saint - 120), died Brescia, Italy
Benedict vi, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Angelus de Scarpetti, Blessed - 1306)Missionary, born and died Borgo San Sepolcro, Italy
Uelf - ) One of a faction in Germany and Italy, in the 12th and 13th centuries, which supported the House of Guelph and the pope, and opposed the Ghibellines, or faction of the German emperors
Evaristus, Pope Saint - Died in Rome, Italy
Leghorn - ) A straw plaiting used for bonnets and hats, made from the straw of a particular kind of wheat, grown for the purpose in Tuscany, Italy; - so called from Leghorn, the place of exportation
Donato Bramante - Born Monte Asdrualdo, Italy, 1444; died Rome, Italy, March 11, 1514
Domenico Capranica - Born in 1400 in Capranica, Italy; died in 1458 in Rome, Italy
Lazzaro Spallanzani - Born on January 10, 1729 in Scandiano, Modena, Italy; died February 12, 1799 in Pavia, Italy
John Bosco, Saint - Founder of the Salesian Society, born Becchi, Piedmont, Italy, 1815; died Turin, Italy, 1888
Frances of Rome, Saint - Mystic, widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440. Relics in church of Saint Francesca Romana, Rome, Italy
Lorrain, Claude de - Painter and etcher, born Chamagne, Lorraine, 1600; died Rome, Italy, 1681. He lived mainly in Italy and resided in Rome from 1625 till his death
John Xix, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as Romanus; died there. As pope he refused the request of the Eastern emperor, Basil II, to allow the Byzantine patriarchs to assume the title "AEcumenical patriarch"; crowned Conrad the Salian emperor, 1027; allowed the subjects of King Canute of Denmark and England to travel to Italy free of customs duties; and settled a dispute between the archbishops of Milan and Ravenna in favor of the former
Leo xi, Pope - Born on June 2, 1535 in Florence, Italy as Alessandro Ottaviano de' Medici; died in Rome, Italy on April 27, 1605
Jesuats - Religious congregation of men founded 1361 at Siena, Italy, by Saint John Colombini, for the care of the sick, particularly the plague-stricken, the burial of the dead, prayer, and strict mortification. Under his successors Francesco Mini and Blessed Jerome Dasciano, the congregation spread rapidly throughout, Italy
Lombardic Architecture - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries. A less pleasing characteristic is the false facade with its walls raised higher than the roof of the church, which became the prevailing form throughout Italy
Carbonari - The avowed aims of the Carbonari were to drive all foreign powers out of Italy and to free the people from absolutism. The society was condemned by the Church in 1814 and again in 1821 and soon after lost its influence, most of the members finally joining the Young Italy and similar organizations
Capranica, Domenico - Born in 1400 in Capranica, Italy; died in 1458 in Rome, Italy
Cantalice, Felix of, Saint - Confessor, born near Cantalice, Italy, 1513; died Rome, Italy, 1587
Canova, Antonio - Sculptor, born Possagno, Italy, 1757; died Venice, Italy, 1822
Lucius Iii, Pope - Born in Lucca, Italy as Ubaldo Allucingoli; died in Verona, Italy
Lombard Romanesque - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries. A less pleasing characteristic is the false facade with its walls raised higher than the roof of the church, which became the prevailing form throughout Italy
Hormisdas, Pope Saint - Born in Frusino, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Giovanni Bona - (1609-1674) Cardinal, liturgist, born Moncovi, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Architecture, Lombardic - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries. A less pleasing characteristic is the false facade with its walls raised higher than the roof of the church, which became the prevailing form throughout Italy
Antonelli, Giacomo - (1806-1876) Cardinal, secretary of state to Pius IX, born Sonnino, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Bartolommeo Gavantus - General of the Barnabite Order, liturgist, born Monza, Italy, 1569; died Milan, Italy, 1683
Antonio Canova - Sculptor, born Possagno, Italy, 1757; died Venice, Italy, 1822
Gavantus, Bartolommeo - General of the Barnabite Order, liturgist, born Monza, Italy, 1569; died Milan, Italy, 1683
Spallanzani, Lazzaro - Born on January 10, 1729 in Scandiano, Modena, Italy; died February 12, 1799 in Pavia, Italy
Romanus - Born in Rome, Italy as Romanus; died there. As pope he refused the request of the Eastern emperor, Basil II, to allow the Byzantine patriarchs to assume the title "AEcumenical patriarch"; crowned Conrad the Salian emperor, 1027; allowed the subjects of King Canute of Denmark and England to travel to Italy free of customs duties; and settled a dispute between the archbishops of Milan and Ravenna in favor of the former
Rome, Frances of, Saint - Mystic, widow, foundress of the Benedictine Oblate congregation of Tor di Specchi, born Rome, Italy, 1384; died there, 1440. Relics in church of Saint Francesca Romana, Rome, Italy
Romanesque, Lombard - The architecture of North Italy developed in the 9th and 10th centuries. A less pleasing characteristic is the false facade with its walls raised higher than the roof of the church, which became the prevailing form throughout Italy
Guelphs And Ghibellines - Two political factions which kept Italy divided during the later Middle Ages. When Otho of Bavaria and Philip of Swabia fought for the imperial crown in Germany and in Italy, at the close of the 12th century, the names of the rival parties were introduced into Italy, Guelfo and Ghibellino being the Italian forms of Well and Waiblingen; the former designated the partisans of the pope and the latter the partisans of the German emperor. The cities of Italy were divided in their allegiance; Florence and Milan, for instance, being Guelph, while Siena and Pisa were Ghibelline
Ghibellines, Guelphs And - Two political factions which kept Italy divided during the later Middle Ages. When Otho of Bavaria and Philip of Swabia fought for the imperial crown in Germany and in Italy, at the close of the 12th century, the names of the rival parties were introduced into Italy, Guelfo and Ghibellino being the Italian forms of Well and Waiblingen; the former designated the partisans of the pope and the latter the partisans of the German emperor. The cities of Italy were divided in their allegiance; Florence and Milan, for instance, being Guelph, while Siena and Pisa were Ghibelline
John Sicco - Born in Rome, Italy as John Sicco; died there
John Xvii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as John Sicco; died there
Anastasius i, Saint, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Euroclydon - A tempestuous wind, which drove ashore, on Malta, the ship in which Paul was sailing to Italy
Illyr'Icum, - an extensive district lying along the eastern coast of the Adriatic, from the boundary of Italy on the north of Epirus on the south, and contiguous to Moessia and Macedonia on the east
Sicco, John - Born in Rome, Italy as John Sicco; died there
Little Sisters of the Holy Family - The congregation has 50 missions in Canada, the United States, and Italy
Holy Family, Little Sisters of the - The congregation has 50 missions in Canada, the United States, and Italy
Giuseppe Pichler - Born Rome, Italy in 1760; died there in 1820
Leucite - It is found in the volcanic rocks of Italy, especially at Vesuvius
Archpresbytery - A peculiar form of diocesan organization, the last one of which, Altamura, in southern Italy, which dated from 1248, was ruled by an archpriest
Hermes, Saint - Martyr, died Rome, Italy, 132
Julius ii, Pope - Born on December 5, 1443 at Albissola, Italy as Giuliano della Rovere; died on February 21, 1513 at Rome, Italy. His interest centered in the temporal glory of the Church, and to this end he joined the League of Cambrai, 1509, and later formed the Holy League, 1511, to free Italy from French rule
Question, Roman - In protest against the usurpation of papal territory, the popes remained voluntary prisoners in the Vatican for 59 years, during the greater part of which sectarian prejudice and hatred kept Italy from coming to terms. On February 11, 1929, the Question was settled by the Treaty of the Lateran, in which Italy recognized both the sovereignty of the Holy See as a national entity, and the City of the Vatican as territory independent of Italy, abolished the Law of Guarantees, and settled all financial relations by payment of 750,000,000 lire cash, and 1,000,000,000 in Italian state console at five per cent; the Holy See in turn renounced its rightful legal claim to the City of Rome, and the old Papal States
Gabriello Condulmaro - Born in Venice, Italy in 1383 as Gabriello Condulmaro or Condulmerio; died in Rome, Italy on February 23, 1447. Refusing, he was exiled by his enemies and resided at Florence, Italy for nearly 10 years
Gabriello Condulmerio - Born in Venice, Italy in 1383 as Gabriello Condulmaro or Condulmerio; died in Rome, Italy on February 23, 1447. Refusing, he was exiled by his enemies and resided at Florence, Italy for nearly 10 years
Giuliano Della Rovere - Born on December 5, 1443 at Albissola, Italy as Giuliano della Rovere; died on February 21, 1513 at Rome, Italy. His interest centered in the temporal glory of the Church, and to this end he joined the League of Cambrai, 1509, and later formed the Holy League, 1511, to free Italy from French rule
Eugene iv, Pope - Born in Venice, Italy in 1383 as Gabriello Condulmaro or Condulmerio; died in Rome, Italy on February 23, 1447. Refusing, he was exiled by his enemies and resided at Florence, Italy for nearly 10 years
Roman Question - In protest against the usurpation of papal territory, the popes remained voluntary prisoners in the Vatican for 59 years, during the greater part of which sectarian prejudice and hatred kept Italy from coming to terms. On February 11, 1929, the Question was settled by the Treaty of the Lateran, in which Italy recognized both the sovereignty of the Holy See as a national entity, and the City of the Vatican as territory independent of Italy, abolished the Law of Guarantees, and settled all financial relations by payment of 750,000,000 lire cash, and 1,000,000,000 in Italian state console at five per cent; the Holy See in turn renounced its rightful legal claim to the City of Rome, and the old Papal States
John Xxiii, Anti-Pope - Born Naples, Italy, c. 1370;died Florence, Italy, 1419
Filippo Brunelleschi - Born in 1377 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1446. He revived the classical style of architecture in Italy, and was the first to apply perspective to art according to definitely formulated rules
Filippo Brunellesco - Born in 1377 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1446. He revived the classical style of architecture in Italy, and was the first to apply perspective to art according to definitely formulated rules
Marinus i, Pope - Born in Gallese, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Cajetan, Tommaso de Vio Gaetani - (1469-1534) Cardinal, philosopher, theologian, and exegete, born Gaeta, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Cesalpino, Andrea - (1519-1603) Physician, philosopher, and botanist, born Arezzo, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Benedict Xiv, Pope - (1740-1758) Born Bologna, Italy, 1675 as Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini; died Rome, Italy
Bellini, Giovanni - Painter, brother of Gentine Bellini, born Padua, Italy, c. 1428;died Venice, Italy, 1516
Martin ii, Pope - Born in Gallese, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Beaufort, Pierre Roger de - Born in 1331 in the castle of Maumont, Limoges, France as Pierre Roger de Beaufort; died Rome, Italy. His policy of appointing Frenchmen to positions in Italy led to rebellion
Andrea Cesalpino - (1519-1603) Physician, philosopher, and botanist, born Arezzo, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Gregory xi, Pope - Born in 1331 in the castle of Maumont, Limoges, France as Pierre Roger de Beaufort; died Rome, Italy. His policy of appointing Frenchmen to positions in Italy led to rebellion
Arnold of Brescia - Demagog, born Brescia, Italy, c. 1100;died Rome, Italy, 1155
Antonio da Sangallo, the Younger - Born in Mugello, Italy April 12, 1484; died in Terni, Italy in August 3, 1546
Tommaso de Vio Gaetani Cajetan - (1469-1534) Cardinal, philosopher, theologian, and exegete, born Gaeta, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Sixtus v, Pope - Born on December 13, 1521 in Grottamare, Italy as Felice Peretti Montalto; died in Rome, Italy on August 27, 1590
Sixtus iv, Pope - Born on July 21, 1414 in Celle, Italy as Francesco della Rovere; died in Rome, Italy on August 12, 1484
Sangalo, Antonio da, the Younger - Born in Mugello, Italy April 12, 1484; died in Terni, Italy in August 3, 1546
Baldassare Cossa - Born Naples, Italy, c. 1370;died Florence, Italy, 1419
Lucius i, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Evangelista Torricelli - Born on October 15, 1608 at Faenz, Italy; died on October 25, 1647
Torricelli, Evangelista - Born on October 15, 1608 at Faenz, Italy; died on October 25, 1647
Pallotti, Vincent Mary, Saint - Founder of the Pious Society of Missions (Pallottines; born Rome, Italy, 1798; died there, 1850
Gallienus, Publius Licinius Egnatius - He was assassinated at Milan, while besieging Aureolus, whom the troops in Italy had proclaimed imperator
Iatromathematician - ) One of a school of physicians in Italy, about the middle of the 17th century, who tried to apply the laws of mechanics and mathematics to the human body, and hence were eager student of anatomy; - opposed to the iatrochemists
Vincent Pallotti - Founder of the Pious Society of Missions (Pallottines; born Rome, Italy, 1798; died there, 1850
Probus, Sextus Anicius Petronius - 371, and four times pretorian prefect of Italy, Illyricum, the Gauls, and Africa. He was appointed pretorian prefect of Italy and Illyricum in 368 (Ammian. Probus continued prefect of Italy until Valentinian died in 374. He appears as pretorian prefect of Italy in 380, and as pretorian prefect in 383–384 ( Cod. in Italy, accompanying him and his mother Justina in their flight to Thessalonica on the invasion of Maximus in 387 (Socr
Jesuatesses - Their growth in Italy was rapid, but by 1812 they had entirely disappeared
Montepulciano, Agnes of, Saint - Born near Montepulciano, Italy, c
Calixtus i, Saint, Pope - Martyr; Roman of the "gens Domitia"; died in Rome, Italy
Callistus i, Saint, Pope - Martyr; Roman of the "gens Domitia"; died in Rome, Italy
Aquarius - ) The Water-bearer; the eleventh sign in the zodiac, which the sun enters about the 20th of January; - so called from the rains which prevail at that season in Italy and the East
Agnes of Montepulciano, Saint - Born near Montepulciano, Italy, c
Gregory Iii, Pope Saint - Born in Syria; died in Rome, Italy
a'Dria - In Paul's time it included the whole sea between Greece and Italy, reaching south from Crete to Sicily
Saint Bonaventure, College of - Quaracchi, Italy Famous as the center of literary activity in the Order of Friars Minor
Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth - The mother-house is in Rome, Italy
Sisters of the Visitation of Mary - Their growth in Italy was rapid, but by 1812 they had entirely disappeared
Lamberto Scannabecchi - Born in Fagnano, Italy as Lamberto Scannabecchi; died at Rome, Italy
Oddone Colonna - Born in 1368 in Genazzano, Italy as Oddone Colonna; died in 1431 in Rome, Italy
James of Viraggio, Blessed - Archbishop of Genoa, born Viraggio (now Varezze), near Genoa, Italy, c. 1230;died Genoa, Italy, 1298
Catherine of Siena, Saint - Virgin, born Siena, Italy, 1347; died Rome, Italy, 1380
Martin v, Pope - Born in 1368 in Genazzano, Italy as Oddone Colonna; died in 1431 in Rome, Italy
Benedict xi, Blessed, Pope - Born in 1240 Treviso, Italy as Niccolo Boccasini; died on July 7, 1304 in Perugia, Italy
Honorius ii, Pope - Born in Fagnano, Italy as Lamberto Scannabecchi; died at Rome, Italy
Guiscard, Robert - Entering the Lombard service, he took part in the defeat of Pope Leo IX at Civitella, and in 1057 became leader of the Normans in their conquest of southern Italy. Having set out to conquer the Byzantine Empire, he was recalled to save Italy from Henry IV, and he rescued Gregory VII in Rome
Giordano Bruno - Heretic, born Nola, Italy, 1548; died Rome, Italy, 1600
Gregory Xii, Pope - 1327in Venice, Italy as Angelo Corrario or Angelo Correr; died on October 18, 1417 at Recanati, Italy
Auxerre, Germain of, Saint - 380;died Ravenna, Italy, 448. About 431 he was sent on a mission to Britain to oppose Pelagianism, and seven years later died in Italy while appealing personally to the emperor for clemency towards the rebellious Armoricans
Angelo Secchi - Born in 1818 in Reggio Emilia, Italy; died on February 26, 1878 in Rome, Italy
Angelo Corrario - 1327in Venice, Italy as Angelo Corrario or Angelo Correr; died on October 18, 1417 at Recanati, Italy
Angelo Correr - 1327in Venice, Italy as Angelo Corrario or Angelo Correr; died on October 18, 1417 at Recanati, Italy
Robert Guiscard - Entering the Lombard service, he took part in the defeat of Pope Leo IX at Civitella, and in 1057 became leader of the Normans in their conquest of southern Italy. Having set out to conquer the Byzantine Empire, he was recalled to save Italy from Henry IV, and he rescued Gregory VII in Rome
Germain of Auxerre, Saint - 380;died Ravenna, Italy, 448. About 431 he was sent on a mission to Britain to oppose Pelagianism, and seven years later died in Italy while appealing personally to the emperor for clemency towards the rebellious Armoricans
Scannabecchi, Lamberto - Born in Fagnano, Italy as Lamberto Scannabecchi; died at Rome, Italy
Secchi, Angelo - Born in 1818 in Reggio Emilia, Italy; died on February 26, 1878 in Rome, Italy
Viraggio, James of, Blessed - Archbishop of Genoa, born Viraggio (now Varezze), near Genoa, Italy, c. 1230;died Genoa, Italy, 1298
Siena, Catherine of, Saint - Virgin, born Siena, Italy, 1347; died Rome, Italy, 1380
Honorius Iii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as Cencio Savelli; elected to the papacy on August 31, 1216 at Perugia, Italy; died on March 18, 1227 at Rome, Italy
Savelli, Cencio - Born in Rome, Italy as Cencio Savelli; elected to the papacy on August 31, 1216 at Perugia, Italy; died on March 18, 1227 at Rome, Italy
Frederick ii - His son Henry was elected king and, entrusting the affairs of Germany to Archbishop Engelbert of Cologne, he returned to Italy and was crowned emperor, 1220. Frederick made Italy the center of his power. He controlled southern Italy and Sicily, though he had been forced to acknowledge the pope as his overlord in the latter. His desire of reestablishing the imperial power in northern Italy was opposed by a league of the Italian cities and also by the Holy See, as it endangered the liberties of the Papal States
Domnus, Pope - Born and died in Rome, Italy
Donos, Pope - Born and died in Rome, Italy
Infessura, Stefano - Chronicler, born Rome, Italy, c
Donatus, Saint - Martyr, Bishop of Arezzo, born Nicomedia; died Rome, Italy, 362
Cadalous, Pietro - (Honorius II) Antipope (1061-1062), born near Verona, Italy; died Parma, 1072
Avernian - ) Of or pertaining to Avernus, a lake of Campania, in Italy, famous for its poisonous vapors, which ancient writers fancied were so malignant as to kill birds flying over it
Myra - City of Lycia in Asia Minor, about two miles inland from its port Andriaca, where on his journey to Rome, Saint Paul and the other prisoners were removed to "a ship sailing into Italy" (Acts 27); in the Vulgate Lystra is substituted for Myra
Church, Latin or Western - Comprehends all the churches of Italy, Portugal, Spain, Africa, the north, and all other countries whither the Romans carried their language
Honorius ii, Anti-Pope - (Honorius II) Antipope (1061-1062), born near Verona, Italy; died Parma, 1072
Anastasius iv, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Onfalonier - ) The chief magistrate of any one of several republics in mediaeveal Italy
Stefano Infessura - Chronicler, born Rome, Italy, c
Spanish College - Rome, Italy
Italy - By the time of Polybius the name had been extended to the whole peninsula, for he speaks of Hannibal crossing the Alps into Italy, and of the plains of the Padus as part of Italy (Hist. At a later time, it is true, Gallia Cisalpina was officially regarded as part of Caesar’s province, and therefore not strictly in Italy, which he did not enter till he crossed the Rubicon; but from the Augustan Age onward the word had its present-day meaning. Nor did Italy herself dream that she had any kind of evangel for the East which she conquered. ... Some of the cities of Italy-certainly Rome and Puteoli, and probably others, though there is no definite information on the point-had felt the presence of Judaism before they were offered Christianity. This was the occasion of the journey of Aquila and Priscilla ‘from Italy’ to Corinth (Acts 18:2). ... Italy was the destination of the prisoner Paul when he made his appeal to Caesar (Acts 27:1). ... In Hebrews 13:24 ‘they of Italy’ (οἱ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰταλίας) join the writer in sending salutations. It is a mistake to imagine that the writer was himself in Italy, and that he was thinking of the Italian Christians around him there. On the contrary, the phrase implies that the author was absent from and writing to Italy, while there were in his company natives of Italy who had embraced Christianity, and who desired to be remembered to their believing compatriots in some part of the home-land. It is not an equally safe, but still a plausible, conjecture that Italy-probably Rome-was the writer’s own home (see article Hebrews, Epistle to the)
Metastasio - Born Rome, Italy, January 13, 1698; died Vienna, Austria, April 12, 1782
Malagrida, Gabriel - Jesuit, born Menaggio, Italy, 1689; died Lisbon, 1761
Canna - ) A measure of length in Italy, varying from six to seven feet
Tiras - Some have identified them with the Etruscans of Italy
Pistole - 90, and in Germany and Italy nearly the same
Gabriel Malagrida - Jesuit, born Menaggio, Italy, 1689; died Lisbon, 1761
Rhegium - A city on the coast near the southwestern end of Italy, Paul was detained at this place for a day when on his voyage to Rome
Sisters of the Sorrowful Mother - They have schools, hospitals, an orphanage, and a sanitarium, in the United States, Italy, Austria, and Germany
Trepassi, Pietro Antonio Domenico Bonaventuba - Born Rome, Italy, January 13, 1698; died Vienna, Austria, April 12, 1782
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus - Anatomist and surgeon, born Acquapendente, Italy, 1537; died Padua, Italy, 1619
John Baptist de Rossi, Saint - Confessor, born Voltaggio, Italy, 1698; died Rome, Italy, 1764
Matteo Ricci - Born on October 6, 1552 in Macerata, Italy; died on May 11, 1610 in Beijing, China. If you have information relevant his cause, contact Curia Diocesana di Macerata, Piazza Strambi, 3,62019 Macerata, Italy
Andrea Pisano - 1273in Pisa, Italy; died in 1348 in Florence, Italy
Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente - Anatomist and surgeon, born Acquapendente, Italy, 1537; died Padua, Italy, 1619
Ricci, Matteo - Born on October 6, 1552 in Macerata, Italy; died on May 11, 1610 in Beijing, China. If you have information relevant his cause, contact Curia Diocesana di Macerata, Piazza Strambi, 3,62019 Macerata, Italy
Majella, Gerard, Saint - Confessor, Redemptiorist, born Muro, Italy, 1726; died 1755
Pandulph - Papal legate and Bishop of Norwich; born Rome, Italy; died there, 1226
John Vii, Pope - Born in Greece; died in Rome, Italy
Charles Lyell - Did distinguished research on marine Tertiary strata of Italy
Illyricum - The region stretching from Italy to Epirus, along the N
Lyell, Charles - Did distinguished research on marine Tertiary strata of Italy
Agnellus of Pisa, Blessed - (1195-1236) Friar Minor, born Pisa, Italy; died Oxford, England
Renaissance - ) The transitional movement in Europe, marked by the revival of classical learning and art in Italy in the 15th century, and the similar revival following in other countries
Abundius, Saint - Bishop of Como, Italy, born Thessalonica
Abdon - Persian noblemen, died Rome, Italy, c250 They were tortured and beheaded in the persecution under Decius
Romanus, Pope - Born in Gallese, Italy
Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin - The congregation has houses, including schools and academies, in France, Switzerland, England, Spain, Italy, the Madeira Islands, Canada, and the United States
Sennen, Saint - Persian noblemen, died Rome, Italy, c250 They were tortured and beheaded in the persecution under Decius
Gerard Majella, Saint - Confessor, Redemptiorist, born Muro, Italy, 1726; died 1755
Western Church - , the Church in western Europe,—Italy, Spain,France, etc
Italy - Italy . coast of Italy to Campania, where it crossed the country and eventually reached Brundisium. The Jews poured into Italy, especially to Rome, and had been familiar to the Italians long before Christianity came
Gregory Xvi, Pope - (1831-1846) Born Belluno, Italy, 1765; died Rome, Italy. In Germany he condemned Hermesianism; in Portugal, Spain, Poland, and France, he combated anti-clerical legislation; and attacked two Protestant societies for promoting anti-clerical free thought in Italy
Bartolomeo Alberto Cappellari Colomba - (1831-1846) Born Belluno, Italy, 1765; died Rome, Italy. In Germany he condemned Hermesianism; in Portugal, Spain, Poland, and France, he combated anti-clerical legislation; and attacked two Protestant societies for promoting anti-clerical free thought in Italy
Leo vi, Pope - Born and died at Rome, Italy
Isaac Henderson - Writer, born Brooklyn, New York, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1909
Caius, Saint, Pope - Probably born in Salona, Dalmatia; died Rome, Italy
Ave Mary - (1):... A particular time (as in Italy, at the ringing of the bells about half an hour after sunset, and also at early dawn), when the people repeat the Ave Maria
Tryphena And Tryphosa - Sebastiano contain the names Tryphena, Philologus, Amplias, and Julia, mentioned in this chapter (Wordsworth, Tour in Italy, 2:17)
Passionist - ) A member of a religious order founded in Italy in 1737, and introduced into the United States in 1852
Agatho Saint, Pope - Born in Sicily; died in Rome, Italy
Agapetus ii, Pope - Elected to the papacy, 946, he labored to restore ecclesiastical discipline, and supported Otto the Great in evangelization of the North, urging him with other nobles to invade Italy for the purpose of restoring order
Tarsiatura - ) A kind of mosaic in woodwork, much employed in Italy in the fifteenth century and later, in which scrolls and arabesques, and sometimes architectural scenes, landscapes, fruits, flowers, and the like, were produced by inlaying pieces of wood of different colors and shades into panels usually of walnut wood
Magenta - ) An aniline dye obtained as an amorphous substance having a green bronze surface color, which dissolves to a shade of red; also, the color; - so called from Magenta, in Italy, in allusion to the battle fought there about the time the dye was discovered
Muscatel - ) A common name for several varieties of rich sweet wine, made in Italy, Spain, and France
Adramyttium - It was in a ship of Adramyttium that Paul on his voyage to Italy sailed from Cæsarea to Myra
Henderson, Isaac Austin - Writer, born Brooklyn, New York, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1909
Andrea Santoro - ... Born September 7, 1945 in Priverno, Latina, Italy ... Died shot from behind with a 9mm handgun on February 5, 2006 while kneeling in prayer in the Santa Maria Church in Trabzon, Turkey; he was killed by Oguzhan Akdin who was 16 years old at the time and claimed to have been influenced by anti-Christian propaganda and the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoon controversy ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Father Andrea, contact... Associazione Don Andrea Santoro... Viale delle Provincie, 47... 00162Roma, Italy ... Additional Information Corriere della Sera - italiano... Independent Online... Spero News... Turkish Weekly... Wikipedia...
Bernardino di Betto di Biagio Pinturicchio - Painter; born Perugia, Italy, 1454; died Siena, Italy, 1513
Elishah - Italy and Sicily, or Carthage and N. gives ‘the province of Italy
Andrea d'Agnolo - ... Born 1486 in Florence, Italy ... Died 1531 in Florence, Italy of natural causes ...
Andrea Del Sarto - ... Born 1486 in Florence, Italy ... Died 1531 in Florence, Italy of natural causes ...
Gregory x, Pope - Born in 1210 in Piacenza, Italy as Teobaldo Visconti; died on January 20, 1276 at Arezzo, Italy
Bartolomeo Eustachius - Anatomist, born San Severino, Italy, 1520; died Rome, Italy, 1574
Eustachius, Bartolomeo - Anatomist, born San Severino, Italy, 1520; died Rome, Italy, 1574
Sarto, Andrea Del - ... Born 1486 in Florence, Italy ... Died 1531 in Florence, Italy of natural causes ...
Santoro, Andrea - ... Born September 7, 1945 in Priverno, Latina, Italy ... Died shot from behind with a 9mm handgun on February 5, 2006 while kneeling in prayer in the Santa Maria Church in Trabzon, Turkey; he was killed by Oguzhan Akdin who was 16 years old at the time and claimed to have been influenced by anti-Christian propaganda and the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoon controversy ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Father Andrea, contact... Associazione Don Andrea Santoro... Viale delle Provincie, 47... 00162Roma, Italy ... Additional Information Corriere della Sera - italiano... Independent Online... Spero News... Turkish Weekly... Wikipedia...
Teobaldo Visconti - Born in 1210 in Piacenza, Italy as Teobaldo Visconti; died on January 20, 1276 at Arezzo, Italy
Visconti, Teobaldo - Born in 1210 in Piacenza, Italy as Teobaldo Visconti; died on January 20, 1276 at Arezzo, Italy
Adria - Paul's time it included the whole sea lying between Italy and Greece, and extending on the south from Crete to Sicily, within which the island of Malta or Melita lies
Chiara Agolanti - (Chiara Agolanti) (1282-1346) Matron, Poor Clare, born Rimini, Italy; died there
Nobili, Robert de' - Missionary, born Montepulciano, Italy, 1577; died Mylapur, India, 1656
Benedict v, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as Grammaticus; died in Hamburg, Germany
Agolanti, Chiara - (Chiara Agolanti) (1282-1346) Matron, Poor Clare, born Rimini, Italy; died there
Aloysius Gentili - Missionary, born Rome, Italy, 1801; died Dublin, Ireland, 1848
Grammaticus - Born in Rome, Italy as Grammaticus; died in Hamburg, Germany
Puteoli - A port in Italy on the N
Adria - (ay' dri a) or ADRIATIC SEA (NAS, NIV) The sea separating Italy and Greece in which Paul's ship drifted for fourteen days as he sailed toward Rome to appeal his case to Caesar (Acts 27:27 )
Onfanon - ) The ensign or standard in use by certain princes or states, such as the mediaeval republics of Italy, and in more recent times by the pope
Gentili, Aloysius - Missionary, born Rome, Italy, 1801; died Dublin, Ireland, 1848
Adria - Adria (â'dri-ah), Acts 27:27, is now the gulf which lies between Italy on one side, and the coast of Dalmatia on the other
Rimini, Clare of, Blessed - (Chiara Agolanti) (1282-1346) Matron, Poor Clare, born Rimini, Italy; died there
Sisters of Saint Ursula of the Blessed Virgin - The society now has houses, academies, schools, and orphanages in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, and the United States
Robert de' Nobili - Missionary, born Montepulciano, Italy, 1577; died Mylapur, India, 1656
Scalabrinians - Founded by Blessed John Baptist Scalabrini, at Piacenza, Italy, 1888, to minister to the spiritual and temporal needs of Italian emigrants in America
Manuel Chrysoloras - Catholic philologist; first teacher of Greek in Italy
Francis Patrizi - Jesuit exegete, born Rome, Italy, 1797; died there, 1881
John v, Pope - Born in Syria; died in Rome, Italy
Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception - The institute includes schools, orphanages, workrooms, nurseries, hospitals, and a leper home, in Canada, China, Japan, Italy, and the Philippines
Luigi Pichler - Born Rome, Italy in 1773; died there in 1854
ab Apostolici - It dealt with public affairs in Italy, describing them as the realization of the Masonic program involving hatred of the Church, abolition of religious instruction in school, and the absolute independence of civilsociety from clerical influence
Sequin - ) An old gold coin of Italy and Turkey
Scudo - ) A silver coin, and money of account, used in Italy and Sicily, varying in value, in different parts, but worth about 4 shillings sterling, or about 96 cents; also, a gold coin worth about the same
Angelo Carletti di Chivasso, Blessed - (1411-1495) Theologian, born Chivasso, Italy; died Coni
Troubadour - ) One of a school of poets who flourished from the eleventh to the thirteenth century, principally in Provence, in the south of France, and also in the north of Italy
Alciati, Giovanni Paolo - Anti-Trinitarian heretic, born Milan, Italy; died Danzig, 1565
Mont de Piete - One of certain public pawnbroking establishments which originated in Italy in the 15th century, the object of which was to lend money at a low rate of interest to poor people in need; - called also mount of piety
Rosemary - ) A labiate shrub (Rosmarinus officinalis) with narrow grayish leaves, growing native in the southern part of France, Spain, and Italy, also in Asia Minor and in China
Severinus, Pope - (Latin: severus, austere, stern) ... Born in Rome, Italy; died there in 640
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Peace - The order manages residences for girls, schools, hospitals, and orphanages, in England, Scotland, Italy, Canada, and the United States
John Capistran, Saint - Confessor, born Sulmona, Italy, 1385; died Hungary, 1456. In 1416 he became a Franciscan and traveled through Italy after his ordination, preaching and performing miracles of healing, and assisting Saint Bernardine of Siena in reforming the Order
Octavius, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy, c. He opened his pontificate with an appeal to Otto I for aid against Berengarius, King of Italy
John Xii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy, c. He opened his pontificate with an appeal to Otto I for aid against Berengarius, King of Italy
Bernardo Paganelli - Confessor of the faith; born in Montemagno, Italy as Bernardo Pignatelli; died at Tivoli, Italy
Bernardo Pignatelli - Confessor of the faith; born in Montemagno, Italy as Bernardo Pignatelli; died at Tivoli, Italy
Paganelli, Bernardo - Confessor of the faith; born in Montemagno, Italy as Bernardo Pignatelli; died at Tivoli, Italy
Domenico Palmieri - Theologian, born Piacenza, Italy, 1829; died Rome, Italy, 1909
Palmieri, Domenico - Theologian, born Piacenza, Italy, 1829; died Rome, Italy, 1909
Cajetan, Saint - (Gaetano, Saint) (1480-1547) Confessor, founder of the Theatines, born Vicenza, Italy; died Naples, Italy
Capistran, John, Saint - Confessor, born Sulmona, Italy, 1385; died Hungary, 1456. In 1416 he became a Franciscan and traveled through Italy after his ordination, preaching and performing miracles of healing, and assisting Saint Bernardine of Siena in reforming the Order
Gaetano, Saint - (Gaetano, Saint) (1480-1547) Confessor, founder of the Theatines, born Vicenza, Italy; died Naples, Italy
Eugene Iii, Pope Blessed - Confessor of the faith; born in Montemagno, Italy as Bernardo Pignatelli; died at Tivoli, Italy
Dan Title - "Don" is used in Italy for all clerks except Mendicant Friars and Regular Clerks
Don - "Don" is used in Italy for all clerks except Mendicant Friars and Regular Clerks
Dotti, Andrew, Blessed - (1256-1315) Born and died Borgo San Sepolcro, Italy
Dalmatia - (dal may' tih uh) Place name referring to the southern part of Illyricum north of Greece and across the Adriatic Sea from Italy
Montefalco, Clare of, Saint - (Latin: clarus, famous) ... Virgin, born Montefalco, Italy, c
Florence, Italy, Archdiocese of - Founded in the 1century, one of the first outposts of the Church in Italy
Franco, Boniface - Antipope (974,984-985), born Rome, Italy; died there
Domenico Barberi - Passionist theologian, born near Viterbo, Italy, 1792; died near Reading, England, 1849
Dominic of the Mother of God - Passionist theologian, born near Viterbo, Italy, 1792; died near Reading, England, 1849
John ii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Cambrai, Peace of - According to the terms Francis renounced his claims upon Italy, Burgundy, and Artois and paid indemnity; Charles released the French princes and agreed not to press claims upon Burgundy at once
Martinian, Saint - Died in Rome, Italy, date unknown
Benedict Vii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Andreis, Felix de - (1778-1820) First superior of the Congregation of the Mission (Vincentians) in the United States, born Demonte, Italy; died Saint Louis, Missouri
Fratricelli - ) A sect which seceded from the Franciscan Order, chiefly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the duty of celibacy and poverty, and discountenancing oaths
Adramyttium - Paul used a ship whose home port was Adramyttium to sail from Caesarea to Italy to appeal his case to Caesar (Acts 27:2 )
Barberi, Domenico - Passionist theologian, born near Viterbo, Italy, 1792; died near Reading, England, 1849
Ballerini, Pietro - (1698-1769) Theologian and canonist, born Verona, Italy
Sisters of the Assumption - The congregation has houses and schools in France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, England, Denmark, North America, Central America, South America, and the Philippines
Sergius ii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there on January 27, 847 of natural causes
Society of the Sisters, Faithful Companions of Jes - The society includes schools, a teacher's training college, orphanage, and hostels for university students in France, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, England, Ireland, Scotland, the Channel Islands, Australia, Canada, and the United States
Society of Our Lady of the Retreat in the Cenacle - The society has houses of retreats in Belgium, England, France, the Netherlands, Italy, Switzerland, Brazil, and the United States
Dominic de Guzman, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Dominican Order, born Calaroga, Old Castile, 1170; died Bologna, Italy, 1221. He traveled extensively, personally supervising the establishment of houses in Spain, Italy, and France
Camillus de Lellis, Saint - (1550-1614) Confessor, born Bacchianico, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Benevento - (Latin, beneventum, fair wind) ... Town and former papal principality of Campania, Italy. From 1053 till 1860, when it was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy, this principality, surrounded by the Kingdom of Naples, was governed by a delegate of the Holy See, but was very often occupied by the Neapolitans
il Sodoma - Painter, born 1477 in Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy; died on February 14, 1549 in Siena, Italy
Giovanni Bazzi - Painter, born 1477 in Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy; died on February 14, 1549 in Siena, Italy
Antoine Ozanam - Litterateur and philanthropist; nephew of Jacques Ozanam; born Milan, Italy, April 23, 1813; died Marseilles, France, September 8, 1853. His writings, which include Etudes Germaniques (Germanic Studies), Poetes franciscains en Italie (Franciscan poets in Italy), and his masterpiece La civilisation chretienne chez les Francs (Christian civilization among the Franks), were inspired by this motive
Bazzi, Giovanni Antonio - Painter, born 1477 in Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy; died on February 14, 1549 in Siena, Italy
Ruggiero Giuseppe Boscovich - (1711-1787) Natural philosopher, born Ragusa, Italy; died Milan, Italy
Ravenna, Italy, City of - City of northern Italy. After this period it was united to the dominions of the Holy See, annexed to Venice in 1438, part of the Cispadane Republic in 1797, and finally joined to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860
Sebastian, Saint - Probaby born in Milan, Italy; died c. 288in Rome, Italy
Cathari - The essential characteristic of the Catharist faith was dualism, and as differences of opinion concerning this belief arose among the Cathari they became divided into various factions: the Bogomili in the East, and the Bagnolenses and Concorrezenses in Italy, professed a mitigated form of dualism, believing the evil principle inferior to the supreme beneficent principle; while the Albanenses in Italy, and almost all the non-Italian Cathari, among them the Albigenses, were rigid dualists, believing in the perfect equality of the good and evil principles. Besides directly assailing the doctrines and hierarchy of the Catholic Church, the various tenets of the Cathari, as the denial of the value of oaths and of the right to punish, undermined the basis of the Christian State, while its abhorrence of generation and its commendation of suicide would have meant the extinction of the human race had the Catharist doctrine been triumphant; but by the 14th century it had practically disappeared from France, Germany, and England, while the 15th century saw the disappearance of the heresy in Italy and the Balkan States
Gregory Vii, Pope Saint - 1020in Soana, Italy as Hildebrand; died in Salerno, Italy. The corrupt clergy of Italy, France, and Spain protested, and Henry IV broke his word and promoted unworthy clerics
Hildebrand - 1020in Soana, Italy as Hildebrand; died in Salerno, Italy. The corrupt clergy of Italy, France, and Spain protested, and Henry IV broke his word and promoted unworthy clerics
Berard of Carbio, Saint - (Beraldus) Martyr, born Calvi, Italy; died Morocco, 1220
Master of the Sentences - 1555;died Rome, Italy, 1625
Juan de Lugo - Cardinal, theologian, born Madrid, Spain, 1583; died Rome, Italy, 1660
Jesus-Mary, Congregation of - The congregation has 70 houses, including colleges, normal schools, boarding and day schools, orphanages, dispensaries, and guesthouses, in France, Spain, England, Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, Germany, India, Argentina, Canada, the United States, and Mexico
Institute of Bon Secours (Troyes) - The order has approximately 120 houses, in France, Belgium, England, Italy, Spain, and Africa
Nazarius, Saint - Nothing is known of them except that their bodies were discovered at Milan by Saint Ambrose, c396 Their apocryphal legend relates that Nazarius was born at Rome, fled to Upper Italy during the persecution of Nero, and traveled through Gaul with Celsus, a young convert of Cimiez
Joannes Catelinus - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Cassian, Saint - (4th century) Martyr, died Imola, Italy
Carbio, Berard of, Saint - (Beraldus) Martyr, born Calvi, Italy; died Morocco, 1220
Celsus, Saint - Nothing is known of them except that their bodies were discovered at Milan by Saint Ambrose, c396 Their apocryphal legend relates that Nazarius was born at Rome, fled to Upper Italy during the persecution of Nero, and traveled through Gaul with Celsus, a young convert of Cimiez
Catelinus, Joannes - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
John Iii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Lombard, Peter - 1555;died Rome, Italy, 1625
Lugo, Juan de - Cardinal, theologian, born Madrid, Spain, 1583; died Rome, Italy, 1660
Honoratus, Saint - Returning to Gaul through Italy, he founded the celebrated monastery of Lérins, and in 426 was appointed Archbishop of Arles
Henry Harland - American novelist; born Saint Petersburg, Russia, 1861; died San Remo, Italy, 1905
Transalpine - ) A native or inhabitant of a country beyond the Alps, that is, out of Italy
Italy - There was constant intercourse between Palestine and Italy in the time of the Romans
Sentences, Master of the - 1555;died Rome, Italy, 1625
Harland, Henry - American novelist; born Saint Petersburg, Russia, 1861; died San Remo, Italy, 1905
Italy - Christianity was introduced in Rome by Saint Peter and Saint Paul a few years after the Crucifixion, and was soon extended to all parts of Italy, with converts from all ranks, so that it was strongly established before the time of Constantine. After a period of occupation by the Goths, Italy again became part of the Roman Empire, subject to the Caesaro-papism and later the culpable neglect of the Byzantine rulers, until Pepin and Charlemagne were summoned by the popes to save Rome from the Lombards. Through the gifts of the German rulers, the generosity of the people, and the need of self defense the States of the Church were established in Italy. In the second half of the 11th century arose the long conflict between the papacy and the German empire which had made use of the episcopal sees in northern and central Italy to maintain its claim to dominion over the peninsula. In the following century with removal of the papal residence to Avignon, Italy became the prey of despots who dominated for selfish ends the prevailing anarchy. Protestantism gained no strong hold in Italy because of vigorous civiland ecclesiastical opposition, the antipathy of the people, and the union of religious, ecclesiastical, and theological activities in the Counter-Reformation. During the 17th and 18th centuries there were continuous conflicts between Catholic states in Italy and the Holy See, supplemented by the political disturbances occasioned by Jansenism, Gallicanism, and the resistance against the power of Islam. Italy became the instrument of Spanish and Austrian policy alternately, and suffered from the anti-ecclesiastical measures of Emperor Joseph II. At the beginning of the 19th century Italy was divided among four powers, Austria, Sardinia, the papacy, and the Bourbons of Naples, Sicily, and Parma. It was then joined by Lombardy, Modena, Parma, Tuscany and the Romagna, the Marches and Umbria, Naples, and Sicily, and in 1861 the Kingdom of Italy was proclaimed at Turin. In the same year Pope Pius IX refused to accept the Law of Guarantees according temporal allegiance to the civilgovernment of Italy
Betty - ) A pear-shaped bottle covered round with straw, in which olive oil is sometimes brought from Italy; - called by chemists a Florence flask
Felix i, Pope Saint - Martyr; born Rome, Italy; died there
Little Sisters of the Assumption - The congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Little Company of Mary - The order has 27 houses, including hospitals, convalescent homes, a sanitorium, a refuge for delinquent girls, and a poor house, in Italy, England, Ireland, Scotland, Malta, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the United States and South America
Matteucci, Carlo - Born Romagna, Italy, 1811; died Leghorn, 1868
Francesco Guicciardini - His chief work is a history of Italy from 1492 to 1534
John xi, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Fabri, Honore - Theologian, born Ain, France, 1607; died Rome, Italy, 1688
Ligure - The "ligurite" is so named from Liguria in Italy, where it was found
Carlo Matteucci - Born Romagna, Italy, 1811; died Leghorn, 1868
Colony - Philippi was one, planted with Italian colonists, transplanted from those parts of Italy which had espoused Antony's side, and which Augustus assigned therefore to his veterans
Mary, Little Company of - The order has 27 houses, including hospitals, convalescent homes, a sanitorium, a refuge for delinquent girls, and a poor house, in Italy, England, Ireland, Scotland, Malta, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the United States and South America
Benedict Sestini - Born in 1816 in Florence, Italy; died in 1890 at Frederick, Maryland
Benedict ii, Saint, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Mary Magdalen de' Pazzi, Saint - Virgin, born Florence, Italy, 1566; died there, 1607
Croisiers - They were, till of late, dispersed in several parts of Europe, particularly in the Low Countries, France, and Bohemia; those of Italy were suppressed even before the late revolutions
Honore Fabri (Lefevre) - Theologian, born Ain, France, 1607; died Rome, Italy, 1688
Agapetus i, Saint Pope - Born in Italy; died in Constantinople
Guicciardini, Francesco - His chief work is a history of Italy from 1492 to 1534
Anastasius the Fuller, Saint - 304), born Aquileia, Italy
Assumption, Little Sisters of the - The congregation has houses in France, Italy, England, Ireland, Spain, Belgium, the United States, and South America
Emiliani, Jerome, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Order of Somaschi, born Venice, Italy, 1481; died Somascha, 1537
Eusebius, Saint Confessor - Confessor, Roman patrician and priest, died Rome, Italy, 357
Acquaviva, Rudolph, Blessed - Missionary Born on October 2, 1550 in Atri, Italy; martyred on July 25, 1583 in Cuncolim, India
Tuscan - ) Of or pertaining to Tuscany in Italy; - specifically designating one of the five orders of architecture recognized and described by the Italian writers of the 16th century, or characteristic of the order
Sergius Iii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there in 911
Rudolph Acquaviva, Blessed - Missionary Born on October 2, 1550 in Atri, Italy; martyred on July 25, 1583 in Cuncolim, India
Sestini, Benedict - Born in 1816 in Florence, Italy; died in 1890 at Frederick, Maryland
Liguori, Alphonsus, Saint - Bishop of Sant' Agata dei Goti, born Marianella, near Naples, Italy, 1696; died Nocera de' Pagani, Italy, 1787
Naples, Italy, City of - City in southern Italy. Under Spanish rule from 1442, conquered by Austria in the War of the Spanish Succession, a French republic in 1799, and a kingdom under Joseph Bonaparte in 1806, it was finally annexed to Italy in 1861
Minims, Order of - The society was first propagated in Italy and introduced by special royal favor into France in 1482. At the death of Saint Francis of Paula, 1507, there existed five provinces, spread over Italy, France, Spain, and Germany
Order of Minims - The society was first propagated in Italy and introduced by special royal favor into France in 1482. At the death of Saint Francis of Paula, 1507, there existed five provinces, spread over Italy, France, Spain, and Germany
Innocent iv, Pope - Born in Genoa, Italy as Sinibaldo de' Fieschi; died in 1254 in Naples, Italy
Honorius i, Pope - Born in the Campagna, Italy; died in Rome, Italy
Vanucci, Pietro - Painter; born Citta della Pieve, Italy, 1446; died Fontignano, near Perugia, Italy, 1524
Spagnoletto - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy. Going to Italy at twenty he was influenced by the works of Caravaggio towards the essential realism and the strong contrasts in lignt and shadow that characterize his style
Ribera, Josef - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy. Going to Italy at twenty he was influenced by the works of Caravaggio towards the essential realism and the strong contrasts in lignt and shadow that characterize his style
Ribera, Juseppe de - Born in 1588 in Jativa, Spain; died in 1656 in Naples, Italy. Going to Italy at twenty he was influenced by the works of Caravaggio towards the essential realism and the strong contrasts in lignt and shadow that characterize his style
Mantellate - Education and the instruction of converts also engage the nuns, who have houses in Italy, France, Spain, England, Canada, and the United States
Ferdinand de Geramb - Abbot and Procurator-General of La Trappe, born Lyons, France, January 14, 1772; died Rome, Italy, March 15, 1848
John of Matha, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Trinitarians, born Faucon, France, 1169; died Rome, Italy, 1213
Matha, John of, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Trinitarians, born Faucon, France, 1169; died Rome, Italy, 1213
Fratres Cruciferi - English branch of the mendicant order of Fratres Cruciferi, claiming Eastern origin and flourishing in Italy in the 12th and 13th centuries; suppressed, 1656
Friars, Crossed - English branch of the mendicant order of Fratres Cruciferi, claiming Eastern origin and flourishing in Italy in the 12th and 13th centuries; suppressed, 1656
Friars, Crutched - English branch of the mendicant order of Fratres Cruciferi, claiming Eastern origin and flourishing in Italy in the 12th and 13th centuries; suppressed, 1656
Linacre, Thomas - After studying at Oxford, he spent 10 years in Italy specializing in the classics, and received his degree in medicine at Padua
John Xviii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as Phasianus; died near there
Loreto, Holy House of - So-called from the tradition that the house, wherein the Holy Family dwelt at Nazareth, was transported by angels to the city of Loreto, Italy
Calixtus Iii, Pope - Born on December 31, 1378 at Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain as Alphonso de Borgia; died on August 6, 1458 at Rome, Italy
Callistus Iii, Pope - Born on December 31, 1378 at Xàtiva, Valencia, Spain as Alphonso de Borgia; died on August 6, 1458 at Rome, Italy
Luigi Galvani - Born Bologna, Italy, 1737; died there, 1798
Holy House of Loreto - So-called from the tradition that the house, wherein the Holy Family dwelt at Nazareth, was transported by angels to the city of Loreto, Italy
Agapitus, Saint - (259-274) Martyr, died Palestrina, Italy
Amphitheater - Remains of other Roman amphitheaters are at Verona, Capua, Pozzuoli and Pola, Italy; Nimes, Arles, Frejus, and Tours, France; Seville and Tarragona, Spain
Galvani, Luigi - Born Bologna, Italy, 1737; died there, 1798
Gregory iv, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Hippolytus, Saint - Martyr, died Rome, Italy, c252He was the jailer of Saint Lawrence who converted him
Anterus, Saint, Pope - Probably born in Greece; died in Rome, Italy
Sirocco - ) An oppressive, relaxing wind from the Libyan deserts, chiefly experienced in Italy, Malta, and Sicily
Acton, John - Professor of modern history at Cambridge, born Naples, Italy, 1834; died Tegernsee, Bavaria, 1902
Geramb, Ferdinand de - Abbot and Procurator-General of La Trappe, born Lyons, France, January 14, 1772; died Rome, Italy, March 15, 1848
Thomas Linacre - After studying at Oxford, he spent 10 years in Italy specializing in the classics, and received his degree in medicine at Padua
Cen'Chrea, - its harbor on the Saronic Gulf) and the emporium of its trade with the Asiatic shores of the Mediterranean, as Lechaeum on the Crointhian Gulf connected it with Italy and the west
Colony, - a designation of Philippi, in (Acts 16:12 ) After the battle of Actium, Augustus assigned to his veterans those parts of Italy which had espoused the cause of Antony, and transported many of the expelled inhabitants to Philippi, Dyrrhachium and other cities
Milan, Italy - (Celtic, met lan) ... City in northern Italy. From 1500 the city was successively under the dominion of France, Spain, and Austria and finally in 1859 was annexed to the kingdom of Italy. It was founded as a diocese in the first century, one of the first sites in Italy
Chevalerie, Henriette Aymer de la - 10-14... 00165 Roma, Italy ...
Foligno, Angela of, Blessed - (1248-1309) Penitent and mystical writer, born Foligno, Italy; died there
Maurice Bourdin - (Gregory VIII) Antipope, 1118, born probably Limoges, France; died Salerno, Italy, c1137 A Cluniac monk, he was made Archbishop of Braga, Portugal, 1111, but was suspended by Paschal II, 1114
Christmas Crib - 1260,and was introduced by the Franciscans in Italy
Maistre, Joseph Marie de, Count - Political philosopher, brother of Xavier de Maistre, born Chambery, France, 1753; died Turin, Italy, 1821
Joseph de Maistre, Count - Political philosopher, brother of Xavier de Maistre, born Chambery, France, 1753; died Turin, Italy, 1821
Dionysius, Pope, Saint - Confessor; probably Greek; died at Rome, Italy
Leo Viii, Pope - Born and died in Rome, Italy
Catherine of Bologna, Saint - (1413-1463) Virgin, Poor Clare, mystical writer, born Bologna, Italy; died there
Campanile - : campana, bell) ... The form of bell tower which was developed by Lombard architects and has prevailed in Italy; usually a tall slender tower, more or less detached from the church, without buttresses and crowned with a turret containing the belfry chamber
Celestine Iii, Pope - 1106at Rome, Italy as Giacinto Bobone; died there
Gregory Viii - Anti-Pope - (Gregory VIII) Antipope, 1118, born probably Limoges, France; died Salerno, Italy, c1137 A Cluniac monk, he was made Archbishop of Braga, Portugal, 1111, but was suspended by Paschal II, 1114
Guido of Crema - Antipope (1164-1168) died Rome, Italy
Alphonsus Salmeron - Born in 1515 in Toledo, Spain; died in 1585 in Naples, Italy
Andrea Della Robbia - Born in 1431 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1528
Henriette Aymer de la Chevalerie - 10-14... 00165 Roma, Italy ...
Angela of Foligno, Blessed - (1248-1309) Penitent and mystical writer, born Foligno, Italy; died there
Hilarius, Pope - Born Sardinia; died Rome, Italy
Hilarus, Pope - Born Sardinia; died Rome, Italy
Hilary, Pope - Born Sardinia; died Rome, Italy
Ursuline - Angela Merici, at Brescia, in Italy, about the year 1537, and so called from St
Eustochium Julia, Saint - Virgin, born Rome, Italy, c
Carmelite - The Carmelites have four tribes, and they have now thirty-eight provinces, besides the congregation in Mantua, in which are fifty-four monasteries, under a vicar general, and the congregations of barefooted Carmelites in Italy and Spain
Sisters of Notre Dame (of Cleveland) - The congregation manages schools, academies, orphanages, a college, and a home for girls, in Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, South America, and the United States
Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition - The congregation has approximately houses, include schools, hospitals, and dispensaries in France, Italy, Malta, Bulgaria, Greece, Cyprus, Crete, Chios, Syria, Palestine, Turkey, Armenia, Africa, Burma, and Australia
Salmeron, Alphonsus - Born in 1515 in Toledo, Spain; died in 1585 in Naples, Italy
Eleutherius, Pope Saint - Born Nicopolis (Epirus), Greece; died Rome, Italy
Giacinto Bobone - 1106at Rome, Italy as Giacinto Bobone; died there
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny - The congregation manages schools, hospitals, dispensaries, clinics, sanitariums, insane asylums, and orphanages, in France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, India, Ceylon, Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles Islands, Nossi-Be, Reunion, the West Indies, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, French Guiana, Chile, Peru, and Oceania
Society of Marie Reparatrice - The order includes houses of retreat, schools, lending libraries, study clubs, workrooms for the poor, orphanages, and dispensaries, in Italy, France, Belgium, Spain, England, Ireland, Canada, Africa, the United States, Cuba, and Palestine
Robbia, Andrea Della - Born in 1431 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1528
Montes Pietatis - They were disseminated throughout Italy through the efforts of this order, particularly in the person of Blessed Bernardine of Feltre whose insistence on interest to protect the institution's permanency raised a controversy among the theologians who considered it usury. Consequent to this the institution spread rapidly throughout France, Italy, and Spain
Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da - Composer of sacred music; born Palestrina, Italy, c. 1526;died Rome, Italy, 1594
Leo ix, Pope Saint - Born on June 21, 1002 at Egisheim, Alsace as Bruno; died in Rome, Italy. The people of southern Italy and Greece sought his aid against the Normans
Leo x, Pope - Born in Florence, Italy in 1475 as Giovanni de'Medici; died on December 1, 1521 at Rome, Italy
Innocent xi, Pope - Born in May 19, 1611 at Como, Italy as Benedetto Odescalchi; died in Rome, Italy on August 12, 1689
Campeggio, Lorenzo - 1472-1539) Cardinal, canonist, ecclesiastical diplomat, and reformer, born Bologna, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Lorenzo Campeggio - 1472-1539) Cardinal, canonist, ecclesiastical diplomat, and reformer, born Bologna, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Benedict xv, Pope - (Giacomo della Chiesa) (1914-1922) Born Pegli, Italy, 1854; died Rome, Italy
Humiliati - Later allowed to return to Italy, they introduced improved German methods of woolen manufacture there. Though the suppression of the male branch of the order was a serious misfortune to the congregation, some houses continued their existence and are still found in Italy
Muratori, Luigi Antonio - Librarian, born Vignola, Italy, 1672; died Modena, Italy, 1750
Luigi Muratori - Librarian, born Vignola, Italy, 1672; died Modena, Italy, 1750
Giotto di Bondone - Painter and architect; born Vespignano, Italy, c. 1266;died Florence, Italy, January 8, 1337
Gregory Xiii, Pope - Born in Bologna, Italy on February 7, 1502; died in Rome, Italy on April 10, 1585
Anthony of Padua, Saint - Confessor of the faith; born in Lisbon, Portugal, 1195; died Vercelli, Italy, 1231. He became a member of the Order of Friars Minor; set sail for missionary work in Africa, but was shipwrecked off the coast of Italy; and retired to the hermitage of Montepaolo to celebrate Mass for the lay brothers
Ugo Buoncompagni - Born in Bologna, Italy on February 7, 1502; died in Rome, Italy on April 10, 1585
Naples, Italy, Archdiocese of - mo Rosario

Pozzuoli

Sessa Aurunca

Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia

Teano-Calvi
See also ...
city of Naples, Italy

patron saints index
Order of Calced Carmelites - Its mother-house is in Rome; it is established in Italy, Spain, England, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Holland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Malta, Palestine, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Australia, and Java
Innocent x, Pope - Born on May 6, 1574 in Rome, Italy as Giambattista Pamfili; died there on January 7, 1655
Charles Spinola, Blessed - He studied at Nola, Italy, under his uncle Cardinal Filippo Spinola, and entered the Society of Jesus at Nola, 1584
Calced Carmelite Order - Its mother-house is in Rome; it is established in Italy, Spain, England, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Holland, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Malta, Palestine, the United States, Canada, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Australia, and Java
Ignazio Persico - Capuchin cardinal, born Naples, Italy, 1823; died 1896
Benedict Viii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as Theophylact of Tusculum; died there
Architecture, Renaissance - A transitional style, which originated in the 15th century in Italy and was copied nearly a century later by France, Germany, and Spain
Gabriel Possenti, Saint - Born Assisi, Italy, 1838; died Isola di Gran Sasso, 1862
Illyricum - A Roman province of southeastern Europe, lying along the eastern coast of the Adriatic, from the boundary of Italy on the north to Epirus on the south, and contiguous to Mœsia and Macedonia on the east
Apollinaris, Saint - 79), first Bishop of Ravenna, born probably Antioch; died Ravenna, Italy
Erasmus, Saint - Tradition holds that he was transported by an angel from Mount Lebanon whence he had fled from the persecution, to Lake Lucrino in Italy, but was seized there and taken to Campania, where he was tortured and put to death
Alexander v, Pope - 1330;died Bologna, Italy
Alexander i, Saint, Pope - Probably born in Rome, Italy; died there
Tubal - The Chaldee interpreters, by Tubal and Meshech, understand Italy and Asia, or rather Ausonia
Spinola, Charles, Blessed - He studied at Nola, Italy, under his uncle Cardinal Filippo Spinola, and entered the Society of Jesus at Nola, 1584
Italy - The Italian band, mentioned in Acts 10:1 , was probably a Roman cohort from Italy, stationed at Cesarea; so called to distinguish it from the other troops, which were drawn from Syria and the adjacent regions
Rhegium - Now Reggio, capital of the province of Calabria Ultra, in the kingdom of Naples, on the coast near the south-west extremity of Italy, eight miles south-east of Messina in Sicily
Puteoli - coast of Italy near Naples
Wesdin, Philip - Born Hoff, Lower Austria, 1748; died Rome, Italy, 1806
Renaissance Architecture - A transitional style, which originated in the 15th century in Italy and was copied nearly a century later by France, Germany, and Spain
Christ the King, Feast of - ... Patronage Aymavilles, Italy... Casal Paula, Malta... Marbel, Philippines, diocese of... Paola, Malta... Rahal Gdid, Malta...
Feast of Christ the King - ... Patronage Aymavilles, Italy... Casal Paula, Malta... Marbel, Philippines, diocese of... Paola, Malta... Rahal Gdid, Malta...
Novellus, Augustine, Blessed - (Matteo de' Termini) General of the Hermits of Saint Augustine, born Termini, Sicily; died San Leonardo, near Siena, Italy, 1309
Palmer, William - Ecclesiastical writer, and prominent figure in the Oxford Movement; born Mixbury, England, 1811; died Rome, Italy, 1879
Daughters of the Cross And Passion - The order has 10 houses in Italy, Spain, France, Belgium, and the United States
Felix of Nola, Saint - Martyr (3century), born Nola, Italy
John, Saint - Martyrs in Rome, Italy, 362
Jean Pitra - Born in 1812 in Champforgeuil, France; died in 1889 in Rome, Italy
Ant - This ant gathers the seeds in the season of ripening, and stores them for future use; a habit that has been observed in ants in Texas, India, and Italy
Nola, Felix of, Saint - Martyr (3century), born Nola, Italy
Regie - Such monopolies are largely employed in Austria, Italy, France, and Spain
Gregory v, Pope - 970in Carinthia as Bruno; died Rome, Italy
Augustine Novellus, Blessed - (Matteo de' Termini) General of the Hermits of Saint Augustine, born Termini, Sicily; died San Leonardo, near Siena, Italy, 1309
William Palmer - Ecclesiastical writer, and prominent figure in the Oxford Movement; born Mixbury, England, 1811; died Rome, Italy, 1879
Feuillants - Pope Urban VIII, 1630, separated the congregation into two branches: that of France, called Notre-Dame des Feuillants, and that of Italy, known as the Bernardoni or Reformed Bernardines. The Bernardines of Italy subsequently incorporated with the Order of Citeaux
Nicholas v, Pope - Born on November 15, 1397 at Sarzano, Italy as Tommaso Parentucelli; died on March 24, 1455 in Rome, Italy
Demetrias, Roman Virgin - They, however, fully approved, and it gladdened all the churches of Italy. Her father having died just before the sack of Rome by Alaric, the family sold their property and set sail for Africa, witnessing the burning of Rome as they left Italy; and, arriving in Africa, fell into the hands of the rapacious count Heraclian, who took away a large part of their property
Tommaso Parentucelli - Born on November 15, 1397 at Sarzano, Italy as Tommaso Parentucelli; died on March 24, 1455 in Rome, Italy
Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona - An institute founded at Verona, Italy in 1861 by Saint Daniel Comboni, as a society of secular priests for the African missions. Besides small residences in Italy, this society has a novitiate at Venegono near Milan, an apostolic school at Brescia, a novitiate for German-speaking members at Brixen (Tyrol), and a house at Gratz (Austria)
Froissart, Jean - During his travels through France, England, and Italy, he gathered the materials for his "Chronicles" which deal mostly with the conflict between France and England from Philip VI to Charles VI
John Mincius - Bishop of Velletri; antipope, 1058-1059; born Rome, Italy
Mincius, John - Bishop of Velletri; antipope, 1058-1059; born Rome, Italy
Ina, Saint - Confessor, King of the West Saxons, died Rome, Italy, 728
Ine, Saint - Confessor, King of the West Saxons, died Rome, Italy, 728
Ini, Saint - Confessor, King of the West Saxons, died Rome, Italy, 728
Institute of Our Lady of Charity of the Refuge - The order has establishments in France, England, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Austria, Canada, and the United States
Faversham, Haymo of - General of the Franciscans; born Faversham, England; died Anagni, Italy, 1243
Kircher, Athanasius - Jesuit scientist, born Geisa, 1601; died Rome, Italy, 1680
Fabian, Pope, Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Miltiades, Pope Saint - Born in Africa; died in Rome, Italy
Melchiades, Pope Saint - Born in Africa; died in Rome, Italy
Lainez, James - Second General of the Society of Jesus, theologian, born Castile, Spain, 1512; died Rome, Italy, 1565
Jean Froissart - During his travels through France, England, and Italy, he gathered the materials for his "Chronicles" which deal mostly with the conflict between France and England from Philip VI to Charles VI
Chartreuse, la Grande - The congregation of La Grande Chartreuse was expelled by the French Government in 1903; it now resides with the general, at Farnea, near Lucca, Italy
James Lainez - Second General of the Society of Jesus, theologian, born Castile, Spain, 1512; died Rome, Italy, 1565
Benedict x Anti-Pope - Bishop of Velletri; antipope, 1058-1059; born Rome, Italy
Nicholas of Tolentino, Saint - Confessor; born Sant' Angelo, Italy, 1246; died Tolentino, 1306
Hyacinth, Saint 11 Sep - 257in Rome, Italy
Grande Chartreuse, la - The congregation of La Grande Chartreuse was expelled by the French Government in 1903; it now resides with the general, at Farnea, near Lucca, Italy
Athanasius Kircher - Jesuit scientist, born Geisa, 1601; died Rome, Italy, 1680
Eugene ii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Sixtus Iii, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there on August 18, 440
Religious of Notre Dame de Sion - The congregation has houses, schools and orphanages in France, Belgium, Italy, Austria, Hungary, Rumania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Palestine, Egypt, Tunis, England, Australia, Canada, Brazil, Costa Rica, and the United States
Gervasius, Saint - Martyrs, died Milan, Italy, c165 They were the sons of Saint Vitalis and Saint Valeria
Haymo of Faversham - General of the Franciscans; born Faversham, England; died Anagni, Italy, 1243
Tolentino, Nicholas of, Saint - Confessor; born Sant' Angelo, Italy, 1246; died Tolentino, 1306
Severus, Septimius - Severus labored to reorganize the Empire on the model of an Oriental despotism, and favored the provinces rather than Italy, basing his power on the Pretorian Guard
Septimius Severus - Severus labored to reorganize the Empire on the model of an Oriental despotism, and favored the provinces rather than Italy, basing his power on the Pretorian Guard
Beschi, Costanzo Giuseppe - 1746) Jesuit missionary and Tamil poet, born Castigione, Italy; died Manapar, India
Menthon, Bernard of, Saint - (923-1008) Confessor, born near Annecy, Savoy (France); died Novara (Italy)
Bernard of Menthon, Saint - (923-1008) Confessor, born near Annecy, Savoy (France); died Novara (Italy)
Little, Bartholomew the - (Bartholomaeus Parvus; Bartholomew the Little) (died 1333) Apostle of Armenia, born Bologna, Italy
Our Lady of Good Counsel - The devotion arose from the legend that the Madonna of Genazzano was miraculously transported from Albania into Italy, accompanying across the Adriatic two Christians who fled from the Mussulman invasion
Maginulf - He wandered through Italy and Germany with the emperor's friends but finally submitted to the pope and was allowed to end his days under the protection of Werner, Duke of Spoleto
Quinones, Francis Cardinal - 1482in Leon, Spain; died in 1540 in Veroli, Italy
Monica, Saint - Body in Church of Saint Augustine, Rome, Italy
Dance of Death - Traces of these plays are found in Germany, France, England, and Italy
Death, Dance of - Traces of these plays are found in Germany, France, England, and Italy
Johann Overbeck - Religious painter; born Lubeck, Germany on July 4, 1789; died Rome, Italy, 1869
Overbeck, Johann Friedrich - Religious painter; born Lubeck, Germany on July 4, 1789; died Rome, Italy, 1869
Calixtus ii, Pope - Born in Quingey, France as Gumo; died Rome, Italy
Callistus ii, Pope - Born in Quingey, France as Gumo; died Rome, Italy
John Gerard - Jesuit missionary, born New Bryn, England, 1564; died Rome, Italy, 1637
John iv, Pope - Born in Dalmatia; died in Rome, Italy
Celtic Rite - Term applied not to one uniform rite, but to a variety of rites used in the ancient churches of Great Britain and Ireland, also in some monasteries founded by Saint Columbanus and his disciples in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy
Martin i, Pope Saint - Born in Todi, Italy; died at Cherson, in the Crimea
Lucca, Anselm of, Saint - 1036-1086), called The Younger to distinguish him from his uncle, Pope Alexander II, born Mantua, Italy; died there
Penance - In Italy and Spain it is usual to see Christians, almost naked, loaded with chains, and lashing themselves at every step
Good Counsel, Our Lady of - The devotion arose from the legend that the Madonna of Genazzano was miraculously transported from Albania into Italy, accompanying across the Adriatic two Christians who fled from the Mussulman invasion
Giuliano da Sangallo - Born in 1445 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1516
Gregory of Valencia - 1550;died Naples, Italy, 1603
Andreas Hofer - Patriot, born Saint Leonhard, Passeyrthale, Tyrol, 1767; executed at Mantua, Italy, 1810
Bartholomew - (Bartholomaeus Parvus; Bartholomew the Little) (died 1333) Apostle of Armenia, born Bologna, Italy
Bartholomew Parvus - (Bartholomaeus Parvus; Bartholomew the Little) (died 1333) Apostle of Armenia, born Bologna, Italy
Bartholomew the Little - (Bartholomaeus Parvus; Bartholomew the Little) (died 1333) Apostle of Armenia, born Bologna, Italy
Anselm of Lucca, Saint - 1036-1086), called The Younger to distinguish him from his uncle, Pope Alexander II, born Mantua, Italy; died there
Hofer, Andreas - Patriot, born Saint Leonhard, Passeyrthale, Tyrol, 1767; executed at Mantua, Italy, 1810
Puteoli - The port of Italy to which ships from Egypt and the Levant commonly sailed (Josephus, Ant
Hebrews - It is believed to have been written in Italy about a
Adrian ii, Pope - 792in Rome, Italy
Adria - This name, which occurs in Acts 27:27 , is now confined to the gulf lying between Italy on the one side, and the coasts of Dalmatia and Albania on the other
Residence - ) The act or fact of residing, abiding, or dwelling in a place for some continuance of time; as, the residence of an American in France or Italy for a year
Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus - 530-600) Latin poet, born between Cenada and Treviso, Italy
Window, Rose - Roses filled with glass of great beauty were used by the Lombard builders of Italy
Sisters Adorers of the Precious Blood - The order has houses in Canada, the United States, Cuba, Italy, and China
Resurrectionists - The congregation devotes itself to work in parishes and missions, and to the education of youth in colleges and seminaries, established in Italy, Canada, and in the United States
Southern Baptist Convention - The Convention carries on foreign missionary work in China, Japan, Africa, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina
Siricius, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy, c
Gerard, John - Jesuit missionary, born New Bryn, England, 1564; died Rome, Italy, 1637
Valencia, Gregory of - 1550;died Naples, Italy, 1603
Sylvester iv - He wandered through Italy and Germany with the emperor's friends but finally submitted to the pope and was allowed to end his days under the protection of Werner, Duke of Spoleto
Sangallo, Giuliano Giamatti da - Born in 1445 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1516
They - Ezekiel 2 ... They of Italy salute you
Rite, Celtic - Term applied not to one uniform rite, but to a variety of rites used in the ancient churches of Great Britain and Ireland, also in some monasteries founded by Saint Columbanus and his disciples in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy
Fra Angelico - (1387-1455) (Guido di Pietro or Giovanni da Fiesole) Religious painter, born near Castello di Vicchio, Tuscany, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Innocent Iii, Pope - 1160in Anagni, Italy as Lotario de' Conti; ascended to the papacy January 8, 1198; died in June 16, 1216 in Perugia, Italy
Matteo of Bascio - Founder and first superior-general of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchins, born Bascio, Italy, c. 1495;died Venice, Italy, 1552
Nicolo Machiavelli - Writer, statesman, born Florence, Italy, 1469; died there, 1527. " He believed a united Italy possible and hoped that the Florentine Medici would realize it
Machiavelli, Nicolo - Writer, statesman, born Florence, Italy, 1469; died there, 1527. " He believed a united Italy possible and hoped that the Florentine Medici would realize it
Humanism - It extended through Italy, where it reached its height, receiving the support of the popes, notably Pius II, Sixtus IV, and Leo X, and the Medici. From Italy the movement spread throughout Europe; into Germany under Reuchlin (1455-1522) and Erasmus (1466-1536), who both exemplified its Christian spirit; into England where Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) was its chief exponent; into the French universities
Lotario de' Conti - 1160in Anagni, Italy as Lotario de' Conti; ascended to the papacy January 8, 1198; died in June 16, 1216 in Perugia, Italy
Angelico, Fra - (1387-1455) (Guido di Pietro or Giovanni da Fiesole) Religious painter, born near Castello di Vicchio, Tuscany, Italy; died Rome, Italy
Bascio, Matteo of - Founder and first superior-general of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchins, born Bascio, Italy, c. 1495;died Venice, Italy, 1552
Augustinians Hermits - The original branches of the Hermits were: the Williamites, the Bonites, the Brittinians, the Hermits of the Holy Trinity in Tuscany, and other houses in Italy. Most of the French houses were destroyed during the French Revolution, losses resulted from the secularization of religious houses in Germany, Austria, and Italy, and in 1835 nearly all the houses in Spain were suppressed. They conduct academies, coileges, seminaries, and missions in Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Malta, England, Ireland, Australia, China, Philippines, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Chile, Cuba, and the United States
Hermits of Saint Augustine - The original branches of the Hermits were: the Williamites, the Bonites, the Brittinians, the Hermits of the Holy Trinity in Tuscany, and other houses in Italy. Most of the French houses were destroyed during the French Revolution, losses resulted from the secularization of religious houses in Germany, Austria, and Italy, and in 1835 nearly all the houses in Spain were suppressed. They conduct academies, coileges, seminaries, and missions in Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Malta, England, Ireland, Australia, China, Philippines, Colombia, Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Ecuador, Chile, Cuba, and the United States
Albion - Albion , king of the Langobardi, or Lombards, and founder of the kingdom subject to that people in Italy, was the son of that Audoin under whom the Lombards emerge from obscurity to occupy Pannonia, invited by the Emperor of Constantinople, in accordance with the usual Byzantine policy, as a check to the Gepidae. The conquest of Italy followed. The number of the army is unknown, but was considerable, as it was a migration of the whole tribe, and it largely changed the character and arrangements of population in Italy. In Liguria (the western half of north Italy), Genoa, with some cities of the Riviera, alone escaped
Justinian, Lawrence, Saint - Confessor, first Patriarch of Venice, born Venice, Italy, 1381; died there, 1456
Lawrence Justinian, Saint - Confessor, first Patriarch of Venice, born Venice, Italy, 1381; died there, 1456
Benizi, Philip, Saint - Confessor; fifth general of the Servite Order; born Florence, 1233; died Todi, Italy, 1285
Monaco, Country / Archdiocese - Constitutional monarchy in Western Europe, bordering the Mediterranean Sea on the southern coast of France, near the border with Italy
Latin Architecture - Early Christian architecture of historic Europe, so called because it was peculiar to the Latin Church, and was developed among the Latin races of Italy
Mann, Horace k - Educator, born London, England, 1859; died Rome, Italy, 1928
Added, Saint - 303), died Rome, Italy
Felix, Saint 30 Aug - 303), died Rome, Italy
Melania the Younger, Saint - Matron, born Rome, Italy, c
Fratres Pontifices - In northern Italy there were similar associations
Freres Pontifes - In northern Italy there were similar associations
Dolci, Carlo - Painter, born Florence, Italy, 1616; died there, 1686
Julius Iii, Pope - Born on September 10, 1487 at Rome, Italy; died there on March 23, 1555
Adrian vi, Pope - Born on March 2, 1459 at Utrecht, Nederlands as Adrian Florensz; September 14, 1523 at Rome, Italy
Dedel, Adrian - Born on March 2, 1459 at Utrecht, Nederlands as Adrian Florensz; September 14, 1523 at Rome, Italy
John Xiii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Innocent v, Pope, Blessed - 1225in Tarentaise, France as Petrus a Tarentasia; died in 1276 in Rome, Italy
Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius - His reign was stained with acts of cruelty and debauchery, although he put an end to the persecutions of Christians in Italy and Africa
Taverns, Three - Paul on his arrival in Italy from the E
League, Lombard - In the treaty of Venice, 1177, Frederick recognized Alexander as pope, which was the defeat of his pretensions to rule Italy and to interfere with papal elections
Catherine de' Ricci, Saint - (Alessandra Lucrezia Romola) (1522-1590) Dominican nun of the Third Order, born Florence; died Prato, Italy
Cascia, Rita of, Saint - Born in 1386 in Rocca Porena, Italy; died in 1456 at the convent of Cascia
Carlo Dolci - Painter, born Florence, Italy, 1616; died there, 1686
Italian Cohort - Probably 1,000 men who had been mustered in Italy composed the unit
Nicholas i, Pope, Saint - Born in 825 in Rome, Italy; died there
Martin iv, Pope - Born in Montpensier, France; died in 1285 in Perugia, Italy
Benedict Iii, Pope - Died in Rome, Italy
Lombard League - In the treaty of Venice, 1177, Frederick recognized Alexander as pope, which was the defeat of his pretensions to rule Italy and to interfere with papal elections
Bergamot - ) A coarse tapestry, manufactured from flock of cotton or hemp, mixed with ox's or goat's hair; - said to have been invented at Bergamo, Italy
Horace Mann - Educator, born London, England, 1859; died Rome, Italy, 1928
Architecture, Latin - Early Christian architecture of historic Europe, so called because it was peculiar to the Latin Church, and was developed among the Latin races of Italy
Altieri, Emilio - Born on July 13, 1590 in Rome, Italy as Emilio Altieri; died there on July 22, 1676
Giovanni de Gaeta - 1058at Gaeta, Italy as Giovanni de Gaeta; died at Cluny, France
Gaeta, Giovanni de - 1058at Gaeta, Italy as Giovanni de Gaeta; died at Cluny, France
Attila - Attila went to Italy and laid Lombardy waste, 452
Antonio Allegri Correggio - Painter, born Correggio, near Modena, Italy, c
Cenchrea - It was the channel of its trade with Italy and the west
Alessandra Lucrezia Romola - (Alessandra Lucrezia Romola) (1522-1590) Dominican nun of the Third Order, born Florence; died Prato, Italy
Adauctus, Saint - 303), died Rome, Italy
Eugene i, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Emilio Altieri - Born on July 13, 1590 in Rome, Italy as Emilio Altieri; died there on July 22, 1676
Adrian Dedel - Born on March 2, 1459 at Utrecht, Nederlands as Adrian Florensz; September 14, 1523 at Rome, Italy
Gelasius ii, Pope - 1058at Gaeta, Italy as Giovanni de Gaeta; died at Cluny, France
Belus - Of the sand of this river, according to Pliny, glass was first made; and ships from Italy continued to convey it to the glass houses of Venice and Genoa, so late as the middle of the seventeenth century
Ricci, Catherine de', Saint - (Alessandra Lucrezia Romola) (1522-1590) Dominican nun of the Third Order, born Florence; died Prato, Italy
Romola, Alessandra Lucrezia - (Alessandra Lucrezia Romola) (1522-1590) Dominican nun of the Third Order, born Florence; died Prato, Italy
Simon de Brie - Born in Montpensier, France; died in 1285 in Perugia, Italy
Simplicius, Pope Saint - Born in Italy; died in Rome
Giammaria Ciocchi Del Monte - Born on September 10, 1487 at Rome, Italy; died there on March 23, 1555
Younger, Melania the, Saint - Matron, born Rome, Italy, c
Rita of Cascia, Saint - Born in 1386 in Rocca Porena, Italy; died in 1456 at the convent of Cascia
Scourge of God - Attila went to Italy and laid Lombardy waste, 452
Sarpi, Paolo - Born on August 15, 1552 in Venice, Italy; died there on January 15, 1623
Fraticelli - They established themselves in southern Italy. After Angelo's death (1337) the Fraticelli split into a number of groups, each with its own doctrines, causing great confusion, mainly in Italy and Sicily
Myra - It grew especially through the Alexandrian corn-trade with Italy. Paul found at Myra ‘a ship of Alexandria sailing to Italy’; whereas in Acts 21:1 Samt
Gregory ix, Pope - 1145in Anagni, Italy as Ugolino; ascended to the papacy on March 19, 1227; died on August 22, 1241 in Rome, Italy
Ugolino, Count of Segni - 1145in Anagni, Italy as Ugolino; ascended to the papacy on March 19, 1227; died on August 22, 1241 in Rome, Italy
Elias Bonibarone - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c. 1180;died Cortona, Italy, 1253
Elias Bonusbaro - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c. 1180;died Cortona, Italy, 1253
Elias of Cortona - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c. 1180;died Cortona, Italy, 1253
Severinus, Monk of Noricum - Odoacer sought him out and desired his blessing when about to invade Italy. "Pursue," said the saint, "your design; proceed to Italy; you will soon cast away this coarse garment of skins, and your wealth will be adequate to your liberality of mind" (Gibbon, c
Labre, Benedict Joseph, Saint - Born Amettes, France; died Rome, Italy
Divine Comedy, the - The poem, 100 cantos in length, written in the measure known as terza rima, is the greatest classic of the Middle Ages and gives a comprehensive picture of Catholic Italy in the 13th century
Divina Commedia, la - The poem, 100 cantos in length, written in the measure known as terza rima, is the greatest classic of the Middle Ages and gives a comprehensive picture of Catholic Italy in the 13th century
Nicholas v, Anti-Pope - Born in Corvaro, Abruzzi, Italy; died in Avignon, France on October 16, 1333
Alphonse Ratisbonne - He was converted to Catholicism by a miraculous apparition of the Blessed Virgin at the church of San Andrea delle Fratte at Rome, Italy
Joseph Calasanctius, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Piarist Order, born Petralta, Aragon, 1556; died Rome, Italy, 1648
Oblates of Saint Francis de Sales of Troyes - At this time the mother-house was transferred to Rome and the congregation divided into three provinces: Latin, German, and English; the first comprising France, Belgium, Italy, Greece and South America; the second, Austria, Germany, and the southern half of its southwest African colony; the third, England, the United States, and the northwestern part of Cape Colony
Mahoney, Francis Sylvester - Ordained at Lucca, Italy in 1832, he exercised his priestly office only for a short time at Cork
Father Prout - Ordained at Lucca, Italy in 1832, he exercised his priestly office only for a short time at Cork
Nicholas ii, Pope - Born in 1010 in Chevron, France as Gerhard of Burgundy; died in Florence, Italy
Floretti - The earliest known manuscript, preserved at Berlin, is dated 1390; first printed at Vicenza, 1476, it enjoyed a wide circulation in Italy, the vernacular version being reckoned among the masterpieces of Italian literature
Little Flowers of Saint Francis - The earliest known manuscript, preserved at Berlin, is dated 1390; first printed at Vicenza, 1476, it enjoyed a wide circulation in Italy, the vernacular version being reckoned among the masterpieces of Italian literature
Juliana Falconieri, Saint - Virgin, foundress of the Servite Tertiaries, born Florence, Italy, 1270; died there, 1341
Falconieri, Juliana, Saint - Virgin, foundress of the Servite Tertiaries, born Florence, Italy, 1270; died there, 1341
Caspar Del Bufalo, Blessed - He devoted himself to suppressing brigandage in the mountains of Albano, and his labors throughout central Italy merited for him the titles of "Hammer of Freemasonry," and "Apostle of Rome
Catherine of Genoa, Saint - Born in 1447 in Genoa, Italy; died there in 1510
Calasanctius, Joseph, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Piarist Order, born Petralta, Aragon, 1556; died Rome, Italy, 1648
Benedict Joseph Labre, Saint - Born Amettes, France; died Rome, Italy
Rhegium - of Italy, at the southern entrance of the straits of Messina, opposite Sicily; now Reggio
Gregory ii, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Cluster - A number of things situated near each other as a cluster of governments in Italy
Genoa, Catherine of, Saint - Born in 1447 in Genoa, Italy; died there in 1510
Ratisbonne, Maria Alphonse - He was converted to Catholicism by a miraculous apparition of the Blessed Virgin at the church of San Andrea delle Fratte at Rome, Italy
Redemptoristines - Community of nuns, founded: at Scala, Italy, 1731, by Father Thomas Falcoia, with a rule based on that of Saint Augustine
Gerhard of Burgundy - Born in 1010 in Chevron, France as Gerhard of Burgundy; died in Florence, Italy
Rainalducci, Pietro - Born in Corvaro, Abruzzi, Italy; died in Avignon, France on October 16, 1333
Regiomontanus - Astronomer, born Konigsberg, Coburg, Germany, 1436; died Rome, Italy, 1476
Robert Parsons - Alias Robert Parsons Jesuit; born Nether Stowey, England, 1546; died Rome, Italy, 1610
Robert Persons - Alias Robert Parsons Jesuit; born Nether Stowey, England, 1546; died Rome, Italy, 1610
Saint Francis, Little Flowers of - The earliest known manuscript, preserved at Berlin, is dated 1390; first printed at Vicenza, 1476, it enjoyed a wide circulation in Italy, the vernacular version being reckoned among the masterpieces of Italian literature
Greece - This name Græci properly belonged only to a small tribe of Greeks, who lived in the north-west of Greece; but as this tribe was apparently the first to attract the attention of Rome, dwelling as it did on the other side of the Adriatic from Italy, the name came to be applied by the Romans to the whole race. Thus a portion of the Crimea, much of the west coast of Asia Minor, settlements in Cyrene, Sicily, Gaul, and Spain, and above all the southern half of Italy, were parts of Hellas in this wide sense. Southern Italy was so studded with Greek settlements that it became known as Magna Græcia . The Empire had two official languages, Latin for Italy and all provinces north, south-west, and west of it; Greek for all east and south-east of Italy
Bellarmine, Robert, Saint - Born in 1542 in Montepulciano, Italy; died in 1621 at Rome, Italy
Robert Bellarmine, Saint - Born in 1542 in Montepulciano, Italy; died in 1621 at Rome, Italy
Theodebert i., King of the Franks - In 538 an army of Theodebert's Burgundian subjects entered Italy with his connivance and helped the Goths to conquer Milan (Procop. In 539 Theodebert, invading Italy at the head of 100,000 Franks, overran a great part of Venetia, Liguria, and the Cottian Alps, till hunger and disease drove the remnant of his army back to France (Marius, ann
Rhegium - (Ῥήλιον, now Reggio)... Rhegium was an ancient Greek colony, mainly of Chalcidians, in the south of Italy. ’ Strabo, in the beginning of our era, speaks of it as ‘tolerably well peopled,’ and as one of three cities founded by the Greeks in Italy-the others were Neapolis and Tarentum-that had not become barbarian, i. , it had a further importance as the terminus of the Via Popilia, which branched from the Via Appia at Capua and traversed southern Italy. Baedeker, southern Italy and sicily12, London, 1896, P
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra - He left the service of Cardinal Acquaviva in Italy to enter the Spanish army and was wounded at Lepanto
Benziger, Joseph Charles - The studios are in Brooklyn, New York, Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Pietrasanta, Italy
Joseph Benziger - The studios are in Brooklyn, New York, Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Pietrasanta, Italy
Leo Xii, Pope - (Annibale Francesco della Genga) (1823-1829) Born near Spoleto, Italy, 1760; died Rome
Octavius - Anti-Pope - Died Lucca, Italy
John of Montecorvino - Archbishop of Peking and founder of the Catholic mission in China, born Montecorvino, Italy, 1246; died Peking, China, 1328
Montecorvino, John of - Archbishop of Peking and founder of the Catholic mission in China, born Montecorvino, Italy, 1246; died Peking, China, 1328
Faber, Peter, Blessed - Born Villaret, Savoy, 1506; died Rome, Italy, 1546
Falconieri, Alexis, Saint - Confessor, born Florence, Italy c
Neri, Philip, Saint - It spread rapidly through Italy and Philip was elected superior general
Daughters of Wisdom - Since the first establishement at La Rochelle, 1713, the congregation has grown to over 420 houses in France, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Italy, South Africa, England, Canada, the United States, Haiti, and Colombia; the mother-house is at Saint-Laurent-sur-Sevre, La Vendee, France; the total number of religious Isaiah 4,912
Les Filles de la Sagesse - Since the first establishement at La Rochelle, 1713, the congregation has grown to over 420 houses in France, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Italy, South Africa, England, Canada, the United States, Haiti, and Colombia; the mother-house is at Saint-Laurent-sur-Sevre, La Vendee, France; the total number of religious Isaiah 4,912
Christina Alexandra - Born on December 8, 1626 in Sweden; died on April 19, 1689 in Rome, Italy
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de - He left the service of Cardinal Acquaviva in Italy to enter the Spanish army and was wounded at Lepanto
Cherubini, Maria Luigi Carlo Zenobio Salvatore - (1760-1842) ... Composer, born Florence, Italy; died Paris, France
Libertines - Four thousnd freedmen were expelled to Sardinia, others were to leave Italy unless they game up Judaism (A
Adria - by Italy
Alexis Falconieri, Saint - Confessor, born Florence, Italy c
Alessandro Scarlatti - He created the 18th century classical style in music, influencing, outside of Italy, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven
Alexandra, Christina - Born on December 8, 1626 in Sweden; died on April 19, 1689 in Rome, Italy
All Hallows - ... Patronage Arzignano, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions ...
All Saints, Feast of - ... Patronage Arzignano, Italy ... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions ...
Crete - A large island in the Mediterranean sea, midway between Syria and Italy
Gelasius i, Pope Saint - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Almug Tree - Shaw supposes that the almug tree was the cypress; and he observes that the wood of this tree is still used in Italy and other places for violins, harpsichords, and other stringed instruments
Millet - A kind of grain of which there are several species cultivated in Italy, Syria, Egypt, and India
Victor iv - Anti-Pope (1159-1164) - Died Lucca, Italy
Society of the Helpers of the Holy Souls - The Society has convents, including schools, orphanages, and settlement houses, in the United States, England, Scotland, France, Belgium, Italy, and China
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Chambery - The congregation has 147 houses, including parochial and high schools, hospitals, a leper asylum, homes for the aged, workrooms for girls, and orphanages, in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Brazil, and the United States (in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and the dioceses of Hartford and Springfield)
Scarlatti, Alessandro - He created the 18th century classical style in music, influencing, outside of Italy, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven
Theatines - Saint Gaetano and his companions endeavored to combat the errors of Martin Luther then threatening Italy; they founded oratories and hospitals and devoted themselves to preaching the Gospel and reforming lax morals. Despite the severity of their rule and strict vow of poverty; the congregation rapidly developed, both in Italy and in foreign countries
Order of Clerks Regular - Saint Gaetano and his companions endeavored to combat the errors of Martin Luther then threatening Italy; they founded oratories and hospitals and devoted themselves to preaching the Gospel and reforming lax morals. Despite the severity of their rule and strict vow of poverty; the congregation rapidly developed, both in Italy and in foreign countries
Pute'Oli - (sulphurous springs ), the great landing-place of travelers to Italy from the Levant, and the harbor to which the Alexandrian corn-ships brought their cargoes. Paul landed in Italy
Maurice Jean de Broglie - Son of Marshal Victor Frangois, Duke de Broglie, in 1803 he supported Napoleon who nominated him to the See of Acqui, Italy, and later to Ghent (1807)
Milanese Rite - (Milanese Rite) The rite used in the Church of Milan, Italy, so called from Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan, probably because he made a revision of it, or because its principal characteristics date from his time
Little Sisters of the Poor - The congregation has homes in France, Italy, Sicily, Spain, Belgium, Portugal, Turkey, Hungary, Switzerland, England, Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, Gibraltar, Malta, Canada, the United States, India, Ceylon, Burma, China, New Zealand, Australia, Africa, Argentina, Chile, and Colombia
Directories, Catholic - There are also Catholic Directories for India, South Africa, Belgium, France, and Italy
Joseph Cottolengo, Blessed - Born Bra, Italy, 1786; died Chieri, 1842
Lambruschini, Luigi - Cardinal, born near Genoa, 1776; died Rome, Italy, 1854
Lawrence of Brindisi, Saint - Confessor, born Brindisi, Italy, 1559; died Lisbon, Portugal, 1619
Kostka, Stanislas - Born in 1550 in Rostkovo, near Prasnysz, Poland; died in 1568 in Rome, Italy
Medal of Saint Benedict - Devotional medal made at the great monastery of the Benedictine Order at Monte Cassino, Italy
Four Crowned Martyrs - In reality five Pannonian sculptors buried in the catacomb of Saints Peter and Marcellinus, Rome, Italy
Duchesne, Louis - Prelate and church historian, member of the French Academy, born Saint Servan, France, 1843; died Rome, Italy, 1922
Otto Iii, Emperor - His imperialism, however, had aroused the opposition of Italy and the German princes, and he was forced, with Sylvester, to abandon the city; he died shortly after and was buried at Aix-la-Chapelle
Donatello - Sculptor, born Florence, Italy, c
Donato di Niccolo di Betto Bardi - Sculptor, born Florence, Italy, c
Catholic Directories - There are also Catholic Directories for India, South Africa, Belgium, France, and Italy
John Gratian - Born in Rome, Italy as John Gratian; probably died at Cologne, Germany in 1048
Luigi Lambruschini - Cardinal, born near Genoa, 1776; died Rome, Italy, 1854
Benedict, Medal of Saint - Devotional medal made at the great monastery of the Benedictine Order at Monte Cassino, Italy
Martyr d'Anghiera, Peter - Historian of Spain, born near Anghiera, Italy, 1451; died Granada, Spain, 1526
Louis Duchesne - Prelate and church historian, member of the French Academy, born Saint Servan, France, 1843; died Rome, Italy, 1922
Benedict ix, Pope - Probably died in Grottaferrata, Italy
Cenchrea - The harbor of Corinth on the Saronic gulf, and its channel of trade with Asia Minor, as Lechaeum, on the Corinthian gulf, was with Italy and the W
Ambrosian Rite - (Milanese Rite) The rite used in the Church of Milan, Italy, so called from Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan, probably because he made a revision of it, or because its principal characteristics date from his time
Apostolic Union of Secular Priests - There are diocesan associations in France, Belgium, Austria, Ireland, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, United States, Canada, South America, Australia, and parts of Asia
Giovanni Cimabue - Painter, born Florence, Italy, c
Gratian, John - Born in Rome, Italy as John Gratian; probably died at Cologne, Germany in 1048
Gregory vi, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy as John Gratian; probably died at Cologne, Germany in 1048
Giovanni Pisano - 1240in Pisa, Italyl; died in 1320, probably in Siena, Italy
Rite, Ambrosian - (Milanese Rite) The rite used in the Church of Milan, Italy, so called from Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan, probably because he made a revision of it, or because its principal characteristics date from his time
Rite, Milanese - (Milanese Rite) The rite used in the Church of Milan, Italy, so called from Saint Ambrose, bishop of Milan, probably because he made a revision of it, or because its principal characteristics date from his time
Baptistery - They are found throughout the Orient and in Italy especially after the 11th-century revival in architecture
Lace - Fine laces are manufactured in France, Italy and England
Stanislas Kostka, Saint - Born in 1550 in Rostkovo, near Prasnysz, Poland; died in 1568 in Rome, Italy
Raphael Santi - Born on April 6, 1483 in Urbino, Italy; died on April 6, 1520 in Rome, Italy
Theodora i., Empress - Vitale at Ravenna has been well engraved in Hodgkin's Invaders of Italy , vol. 40–41; Dahn, Prokopius von Cäsarea ; Hodgkin, Invaders of Italy , iii
Francis of Assisi, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Franciscan Order, born Assisi, Italy, 1182; died there, 1226. Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing miracles. Relics at Assisi, Italy
Assisi, Francis of, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Franciscan Order, born Assisi, Italy, 1182; died there, 1226. Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing miracles. Relics at Assisi, Italy
Eusebius (99), Presbyter of Cremona - He was with Jerome at Bethlehem in 393, and became the unconscious means of extending into Italy the strife concerning Origenism which had begun at Jerusalem. Eusebius remained at Bethlehem till Easter, 398, when he was obliged to return hastily to Italy. He appears to have remained in Italy supporting Jerome's interests and corresponding with him
Benincasa, Ursula, Venerable - Born Naples; died near Castel Saint Elmo, Italy
Justinian i - During his reign of 38 years, the most brilliant period of the Byzantine Empire, he warred against the Persians, overcame the Goths and Vandals, conquered Spain, Italy, Sicily, Dalmatia, and Africa, and crushed the Nika revolt in Constantinople
Mariano Rampolla Del Tindaro - Born on August 17, 1843 in Polizzi, Sicily; died on December 16, 1913 in Rome, Italy
Benedict of Nursia, Saint - Confessor, founder of western monasticism, born Nursia, Italy, c
Malta, Knights of - There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy
Knights of Malta - There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy
Knights of Rhodes - There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy
Marianists - The order spread rapidly, establishing houses in France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Africa, China, Japan, Hawaiian Islands, Canada, Mexico, and the United States
Jacopo Benedetti - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Jacopo Benedicti - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Jacopone da Todi - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Italy - Italy is named in the New Testament in Acts 18:2 ; Acts 27:1 ,Acts 27:1,27:6 and Hebrews 13:24
Nursia, Benedict of, Saint - Confessor, founder of western monasticism, born Nursia, Italy, c
Lorenzo Hervas y Panduro - Famous Jesuit philologist, born Horcajo, Spain, 1735; died Rome, Italy, 1809
Ignatius of Antioch, Saint - 50;died Rome, Italy, 107
Benedetti, Jacopo - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Benedicti, Jacopo - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Hospitallers of Saint John of Jerusalem - There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy
Andreas Pozzo - Born on November 30, 1642 in Trent, Italy; died on August 31, 1709 in Vienna, Austria
Gioacchino Rossini - Born on February 29, 1792 in Pesaro, Italy; died on November 13, 1868 in Passy, France
Hervas y Panduro, Lorenzo - Famous Jesuit philologist, born Horcajo, Spain, 1735; died Rome, Italy, 1809
Antioch, Ignatius of, Saint - 50;died Rome, Italy, 107
Barbara, Saint - Relics at Burano, Italy, and Kief, Russia
Carpenter - The word is never applied, as in Italy and Spain, to a coach-maker
Ursula Benincasa, Venerable - Born Naples; died near Castel Saint Elmo, Italy
Rossini, Gioacchino Antonio - Born on February 29, 1792 in Pesaro, Italy; died on November 13, 1868 in Passy, France
Rampolla Del Tindaro, Mariano - Born on August 17, 1843 in Polizzi, Sicily; died on December 16, 1913 in Rome, Italy
Society of Mary, of Paris - The order spread rapidly, establishing houses in France, Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Africa, China, Japan, Hawaiian Islands, Canada, Mexico, and the United States
Rhodes, Knights of - There are four great priories in Bohemia and Italy
Todi, Jacopone da - Poet, born Todi, Italy, c
Theodoricus, the Ostrogoth - Theodoricus (3) ( Theodericus ), the Ostrogoth, king in Italy. In 487 Zeno induced Theodoric to undertake an expedition to Italy for the purpose of overthrowing Odoacer. Their progress by Sirmium and Pannonia was slow, impeded by the winter weather and the opposition of the Gepidae and Sarmatians; not till the summer of 489 did they force their way through the Julian Alps into Italy. Already king of the Ostrogoths, he was thus recognized as king over his new conquests; but, like Odoacer, he assumed the title without any territorial definition such as "king of Italy. At Constantinople Theodoric was regarded merely as de jure the lieutenant of the emperor who had commissioned him to recover Italy, and the Byzantine claims were only kept in abeyance for a convenient opportunity. ... His first care after the overthrow of Odoacer was to arrange the settlement of his followers in Italy. Under his firm rule Italy enjoyed 33 years of peace and prosperity such as she had not known for nearly a century, and was not to know again for generations. Italy during the war with Odoacer; and in his interference in the troubles following the disputed election of SYMMACHUS and LAURENTIUS he seems to have acted solely with a view to benefit the church. 39, of his rule in Italy
Padua, Italy, Diocese of - Org

patron saints index: Padua, Italy, city of
Institute of Charity - A religious congregation founded in 1828 by Antonio Rosmini-Serbati at Domodossola, Italy
John Xxi, Pope - Born between 1210-1220 at Lisbon, Portugal; died in 1277 in Viterbo, Italy
Calderon de la Barca, Pedro - He attended the University of Salamanca, and after participating in the Spanish campaigns in Italy and the Netherlands, was given charge of the Buen Retiro theater in Madrid
Camaldolese Order - Hermits and cenobites living under a modified form of the Rule of Saint Romuald by whom they were founded at Camaldoli, Italy, c1012The object of the founder was to introduce into the West the eremitical life led by the Eastern monks and the Fathers of the Desert
Brethren And Sisters of the Free Spirit - An appellation assumed by a sect which sprung up towards the close of the thirteenth century, and gained many adherents in Italy, France, and Germany
Lorenzo Ghiberti - Sculptor, born Florence, Italy, c
Luca Della Robbia - Born in 1400 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1482
Honorius iv, Pope - 1210in Rome, Italy as Giacomo Savelli; died there on April 3, 1287
Anacletus ii - Antipope from 1130 to 1138; born Rome, Italy; died there
Giles of Rome - Augustinian philosopher and theologion, called Doctor fundatissimus, born Rome, Italy, c
Antonio Rosmini-Serbati - Born on March 24, 1797 in Rovereto, Austrian Tyrol; died on July 1, 1855 in Stresa, Italy
Hispanus, Petrus - Born between 1210-1220 at Lisbon, Portugal; died in 1277 in Viterbo, Italy
Montessori Method - Maria Montessori while teaching in the "Houses of Childhood" (schools in the poorest tenement districts of Rome, Italy), and first fully described by her in 1909
Iconoclastes - The great opposition to images began under Bardanes, a Greek emperor, in the beginning of the eighth century; and was revived again, a few years after, under Leo, the Isaurian, who issued an edict against image worship, which occasioned a civil war in the islands of the Archipelago, and afterward in Italy; the Roman pontiffs and Greek councils alternately supporting it
Gomer - In fact, under the names of Cimmerii, Cimbri, Cymrig, Cumbri, Umbri, and Cambri, the tribes of Gomerians extended themselves from the Euxine to the Atlantic, and from Italy to the Baltic; having added to their original names those of Celts, Gauls, Galatae, and Gaels, superadded
Roch, Saint - Visiting Italy as a mendicant pilgrim, he devoted himself to the care of the plague-stricken, effecting miraculous cures by making the sign of the cross
Rosminians - A religious congregation founded in 1828 by Antonio Rosmini-Serbati at Domodossola, Italy
Savelli, Giacomo - 1210in Rome, Italy as Giacomo Savelli; died there on April 3, 1287
Giacomo Savelli - 1210in Rome, Italy as Giacomo Savelli; died there on April 3, 1287
Egidio Colonna - Augustinian philosopher and theologion, called Doctor fundatissimus, born Rome, Italy, c
Rome, Giles of - Augustinian philosopher and theologion, called Doctor fundatissimus, born Rome, Italy, c
Society of the Priests of Mercy of the Immaculate - The Society is now established in France, Italy, Belgium, and the United States
Romanesque Art And Architecture - It was called Norman in England, and Lombard in Italy
Ghiberti, Lorenzo di Cione - Sculptor, born Florence, Italy, c
Robbia, Luca Della - Born in 1400 in Florence, Italy; died there in 1482
Rosmini-Serbati, Antonio - Born on March 24, 1797 in Rovereto, Austrian Tyrol; died on July 1, 1855 in Stresa, Italy
Winter - He wintered in Italy
Donatio Constantini - In addition the emperor transfers to the pope and his successors, as their property, the city of Rome as well as the castles, towns, and provinces of all Italy and the West. Some hold it was intended to support the claims of the popes to secular power in Italy; others, to exalt the power of the popes over the emperors
Donation of Constantine - In addition the emperor transfers to the pope and his successors, as their property, the city of Rome as well as the castles, towns, and provinces of all Italy and the West. Some hold it was intended to support the claims of the popes to secular power in Italy; others, to exalt the power of the popes over the emperors
Modus Vivendi - On February 11, 1929c, Italy in the Lateran Palace entered into both a concordat and a treaty with the Church. Pope Pius XI has arranged concordats, or modus vivendi, with Serbia, the Letts, Bavaria, Poland, France for Syria, Lithuania, Czechoslovakia, Portugal, Mexico, and Italy
Order of the Most Holy Trinity - This rule spread to Italy and Austria, and the Discalced also went to France, where they were suppressed by a papal Bull in 1771. They have retained a few houses in Italy, Spain, and the Spanish colonies
Michelangelo Buonarroti - Sculptor, painter, and architect, born Caprese, near Florence, Italy, March 6, 1475; died Rome, Italy, February 18, 1564
Benedetto Gaetani - 1235in Anagni, Italy as Benedetto Gaetani; died on October 11, 1303 in Rome, Italy
Gaetani, Benedetto - 1235in Anagni, Italy as Benedetto Gaetani; died on October 11, 1303 in Rome, Italy
Trinitarians - This rule spread to Italy and Austria, and the Discalced also went to France, where they were suppressed by a papal Bull in 1771. They have retained a few houses in Italy, Spain, and the Spanish colonies
Vivendi, Modus - On February 11, 1929c, Italy in the Lateran Palace entered into both a concordat and a treaty with the Church. Pope Pius XI has arranged concordats, or modus vivendi, with Serbia, the Letts, Bavaria, Poland, France for Syria, Lithuania, Czechoslovakia, Portugal, Mexico, and Italy
States, Papal - In the 19th century the movement to unite the various principalities of Italy into one nation was successful. This ended the actual possession by the popes of the papal states, but the right to them endured until Pope Pius XI, in the Treaty of the Lateran, February 11, 1929, ceded all but a small portion to the Kingdom of Italy
Feast of Saint Peter in Chains - ... Patronage Donnas, Italy ...
Maury, Jean Siffrein - Cardinal and statesman, born Valreas near Avignon, France, 1746; died Rome, Italy, 1817
Fesch, Joseph - Cardinal, uncle of Napoleon I, born Ajaccio, Corsica, January 3, 1763; died Rome, Italy, May 13, 1839
John Colombini, Blessed - Confessor, founder of the Jesuats, born Siena, Italy, 1300; died on the way to Acquapendente, 1367
Francis of Paula, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Order of Minims, born Paula, Italy, 1416; died Plessis-les-Tours, France, 1507
Discipline, Congregation of - Its work consisted chiefly in designating in Italy and the adjacent islands monasteries or convents of men as novitiates or houses of study, granting permission for the admission of novices, seeing to the observance of a perfect community life, and dispensing from rules in regard to the internal discipline of a religious house
Neo-Scholasticism - The Neo-Scholastic movement was begun in Italy by such men as Liberatore and San Severino, and in Germany by Kleutgen and Stoeckl even before the appearance, in 1879, of the celebrated encyclical of Leo XIII, "AEterni Patris" which solemnly approved the movement and gave it a powerful impetus
Ingres, Jean Auguste Dominique - Going to Rome in 1806 he remained in Italy until 1824, his art being much influenced by the study of Raphael
Jean Maury - Cardinal and statesman, born Valreas near Avignon, France, 1746; died Rome, Italy, 1817
Jean Flandrin - Painter, born Lyons, France, 1809; died Rome, Italy, 1864
Jean Ingres - Going to Rome in 1806 he remained in Italy until 1824, his art being much influenced by the study of Raphael
o'Reilly, Edmund - Entered the Jesuit novitiate at Naples, Italy
Nicolas Poussin - Painter; born in 1594 in Villers, near Rouen, France; died in 1666 in Rome, Italy
Prince - In Italy a prince is inferior to a duke as a member of a particular order of nobility; in Spain he is always one of the royal family
Aquileia - (now Aglar) A city at the head of the Adriatic Sea, Italy, for many centuries seat of a patriarchate
Aglar - (now Aglar) A city at the head of the Adriatic Sea, Italy, for many centuries seat of a patriarchate
Abbey of Grottaferrata - 5 miles from Frascati, Italy, founded 1004 by Saint Nilus, a Calabrian Greek, who obtained the site from Gregory, Count of Tusculum
Edmund o'Reilly - Entered the Jesuit novitiate at Naples, Italy
Genoa, Italy, City of - (Italian: Genova) ... City and former republic, Italy
Saint Peter in Chains, Feast of - ... Patronage Donnas, Italy ...
Libertines - It is, however, most probable that this word denotes Jews who had been taken captive by the Romans in war, and carried to Italy; and having there been manumitted, were accustomed to visit Jerusalem in such numbers as to erect a synagogue for their particular use; as was the case with Jews from other cities mentioned in the context
Semaine - It brought together a great many priests and lay-people, and the idea was imitated in Spain and Italy, and meetings were sometimes held in London
Society of Saint Francis de Sales - Founded for the Christian education of the young by Saint John (Don) Bosco near Turin, Italy in 1844
Salesians of Don Bosco - Founded for the Christian education of the young by Saint John (Don) Bosco near Turin, Italy in 1844
Oratory - There were two congregations of religious, one in Italy, the other in France, which were called by his name. The Priests of the Oratory in Italy had for their founder, St. The Priest of the Oratory in France were established on the model of those in Italy, and owe their rise to cardinal Berulle, a native of Champagne, who resolved upon this foundation in order to revive the splendour of the ecclesiastical state, which was greatly sunk through the miseries of the civil wars, the increase of heresies, and a general corruption of manners
Justina, Empress - She placed her son in his hands, and induced him to undertake the delicate task of going as ambassador to Maximus, to persuade him to be contented with Gratian's provinces and to leave Valentinian in undisturbed possession of Italy, Africa, and Western Illyricum (St. After Easter 387 he was sent to Trier to ask that the body of Gratian should be restored to his brother and to avert Maximus's threatened invasion of Italy (Ep. His mission was unsuccessful; Maximus crossed the Alps in the autumn and made himself master of Italy without striking a blow
Lay Brothers - They originated probably in Italy early in the 11th century when it became necessary to differentiate between ecclesiastics and their non-clerical brethren, who were ignorant of Latin and therefore incapable of performing choir duties or attaining to Holy Orders
Dome - Medieval builders rarely used it except in Spain and Italy
Christian Democracy - These principles are embodied in the program of the Catholic political parties of Belgium, France, and Italy, and these parties are designated as Christian democracies
Democracy, Christian - These principles are embodied in the program of the Catholic political parties of Belgium, France, and Italy, and these parties are designated as Christian democracies
Lanfranc - Archbishop of Canterbury, born Pavia, Italy, c
Domenis, Marco Antonio de - Ecclesiastic, scientist, and apostate, born island of Arbe, off Dalmatia, 1566; died Rome, Italy, 1624
Marco Antonio de Dominis - Ecclesiastic, scientist, and apostate, born island of Arbe, off Dalmatia, 1566; died Rome, Italy, 1624
Institute of the Holy Family - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation

Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages

Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools

Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing

Sisters of Hope, care of the sick

Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages

Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Miguel de Molinos - 1628;died Rome, Italy, 1696
Molinos, Miguel de - 1628;died Rome, Italy, 1696
Orlandus de Lassus - Brought to Italy early by his patron, Ferdinand de Gonzaga, he became choirmaster at Saint John Lateran
Lassus, Orlandus de - Brought to Italy early by his patron, Ferdinand de Gonzaga, he became choirmaster at Saint John Lateran
Lattre, Roland de - Brought to Italy early by his patron, Ferdinand de Gonzaga, he became choirmaster at Saint John Lateran
John xv, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Rhegium - RHEGIUM (now Reggio ) was an old Greek colony near the south-western extremity of Italy, and close to the point from which there is the shortest passage to Sicily
Otto iv, Emperor - Philip's seizure of the See of Mainz caused Innocent III to support Otto who, in return, made generous concessions to the Holy See, thus aiding Innocent's ambition to be overlord of Italy
Januarius And Companions, Saint - Martyrs, died near Pozzuoli, Italy, c305 Januarius, a native of Benevento, was bishop of that city during the persecution of Diocletian
Holy Shroud - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Guido d' Arezzo - 995,probably near Paris, France ... Died 1050 at Avellano, near Arezzo, Italy of natural causes ...
Apse - It was retained in Byzantine churches, was universally adopted in Germany, and was common in France and Italy
Province - ) A country or region, more or less remote from the city of Rome, brought under the Roman government; a conquered country beyond the limits of Italy
Hermit - Individual hermits were numerous in the 17th century in Italy, Spain, France, and Flanders, but it has ever been the wish of the Church that the hermits be united into communities
Garden - Lombardy is the garden of Italy
Austria - Independent republic of central Europe, bounded on the north by Germany and Czechoslovakia, east by Czechoslovakia and Hungary, south by Italy and Yugoslavia, west by Switzerland
Interdict - This censure has been frequently executed in France, Italy, and Germany; and in the year 1170, Pope Alexander III
Eucharistic Congress - Other congresses: ...
Avignon, France, 1882

Liege, Belgium, 1883

Fribourg, Switzerland, 1885

Toulouse, France, 1886

Paris, France, 1887

Antwerp, Belgium, 1890

Jerusalem, 1893

Rheims, France, 1894

Paray-le-Monial, France, 1897

Brussels, Belgium, 1898

Lourdes, France, 1899

Angers, France, 1901

Namur, Belgium, 1902

Angouleme, France, 1904

Rome, 1905

Tournai, Belgium, 1906

Metz, Lorraine, Germany, 1907

London, 1908

Cologne, Germany, 1909

Montreal, Canada, 1910

Madrid, Spain, 1911

Vienna, Austria, 1912

Malta, 1913

Lourdes, France, 1914

Rome, Italy, 1922

Amsterdam, Holland, 1924

Chicago, Illinois, 1926

Sydney, Australia, 1928

Washington, DC, 2004
Ecclesiastical Embroidery - In the 11th and 12th centuries Sicily was famous, in the 13th and 14th, England, France, Italy, and Germany also produced splendid work
Embroidery, Ecclesiastical - In the 11th and 12th centuries Sicily was famous, in the 13th and 14th, England, France, Italy, and Germany also produced splendid work
Domnus i, Bishop of Antioch - The emperor decided that the right of occupation should belong to the party in communion with the bishops of Italy and the see of Rome
Travel - ) An account, by a traveler, of occurrences and observations during a journey; as, a book of travels; - often used as the title of a book; as, Travels in Italy
Roland de Lattre - Brought to Italy early by his patron, Ferdinand de Gonzaga, he became choirmaster at Saint John Lateran
Sisters of the Holy Family -(Bordeaux) - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation

Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages

Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools

Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing

Sisters of Hope, care of the sick

Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages

Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Shroud, Holy - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Shroud of Turin - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Turin, Shroud of - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Joannes Iii, Bishop of Rome - The exarch Narses, having retired to Naples, there invited the Lombards to invade Italy
Roman Empire - Hill towns are still a feature of Italy. A further absorption seems to have taken place as the result of struggles with their northern neighbours on the banks of the Tiber, the mysterious Etruscans, who were believed to have come from Lydia in Asia Minor through Thrace to Italy. But for this league Rome could never have conquered Italy. The long contest was for supremacy in Italy. The Samnites inhabited the central area of Italy, the Appenines, but frequently over-ran the rich plains at their feet. About 300 the Roman power seemed established in central Italy. Rome’s mastery in Italy was now assured, though it took about a quarter of a century more to subdue the whole peninsula. Conquest of Greek cities of South Italy. -The next stage in Rome’s career of battle was carried out in connexion with the Greek cities in the south of Italy. Soon after, every nation in Italy south of the 44th parallel of latitude owned Rome’s supremacy. She gave the cities of Italy self-government, and as far as possible incorporated them with the Roman State. The free inhabitants of Italy consisted now of (a) Roman citizens, residents in Roman territory and in coloniae, and individuals in municipia on whom citizenship had been conferred; (b) inhabitants of municipia (certain country towns) who had the citizenship of Rome (i. ) the free and allied cities, comprising all the rest of Italy, which had a military alliance with Rome, regulated either by foedus (formal treaty) or by lex data (a charter). Rome was not as yet a naval power, but amongst her new Greek subjects (or allies) in southern Italy there were many traders by sea, and these had to be protected. The Carthaginians must not be allowed to occupy a place so close to Italy. North Italy had been thus opened up (the Via Flaminia had been built from Rome to Ariminum in 220 b. 218) in North Italy, at the Trasimene lake in Etruria (217), and at Cannae in Apulia (216). The fidelity of Rome’s most important allies in Italy, the inability of Hannibal’s army to conduct successful siege operations, and other factors preserved Rome at this crisis. The Roman army was broken up into many small portions, leading strategic points were well garrisoned, and flying columns were dispatched over Italy, Capua, Tarentum, and Syracuse (in Sicily) were in turn lost and recovered. Hannibal then retired to the very south of Italy. About the same period the Gauls in the north of Italy had to be subdued, and from this time (191) Cisalpine Gaul was a Roman province. ), the result of which was that the territory of the city-State Rome now stretched from a point a little to the north of Florence as far as the extreme south of Italy
Galilei, Galileo - Catholic physicist and astronomer, born Pisa, Italy, 1564; died Arcetri, Italy, 1642
Galileo Galilei - Catholic physicist and astronomer, born Pisa, Italy, 1564; died Arcetri, Italy, 1642
Sisters of Saint Clare - Founded in 1212 at the convent of San Damiano, Assisi, Italy by Saint Clare of Assisi under the direction of Saint Francis of Assisi, who charged the community to live according to the gospel counsels. The Order has houses in Italy, Corsica, Palestine, Prussia, Bavaria, Holland, Belgium, Ireland, England, France, Spain, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, and the United States
Second Order of Saint Francis - Founded in 1212 at the convent of San Damiano, Assisi, Italy by Saint Clare of Assisi under the direction of Saint Francis of Assisi, who charged the community to live according to the gospel counsels. The Order has houses in Italy, Corsica, Palestine, Prussia, Bavaria, Holland, Belgium, Ireland, England, France, Spain, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, and the United States
Puteoli - It was ‘the Liverpool of Italy’ (Conybeare-Howson, The Life and Epistles of St. Paul’s arrival in Italy. Baedeker, Southern Italy and Sicily12, 1896
Johannes Bessarion - 1403-1472) Cardinal, classical scholar, born Trebizond, Asia Minor; died Ravenna, Italy
Bessarion, Johannes - 1403-1472) Cardinal, classical scholar, born Trebizond, Asia Minor; died Ravenna, Italy
Florence, Italy, City of - (Italian: Firenze) ... City and former state of Italy
Deusdedit - (Latin: God-given) ... Cardinal, canonist, born Todi, Italy; died c1100 A member of the Benedictine Order and a zealous ecclesiastical reformer, he was created cardinal by Gregory VII
Durandus, William, the Elder - 1237;died Rome, Italy, 1296
de Rossi, Giovanni Battista - Christian archaeologist, born Rome, Italy, 1822; died Castel Gandolfo, 1894
Friar - The two usual divisions of orders of friars are: ... (1) the four great orders mentioned by the Second Council of Lyons: Dominicans (Black Friars), Franciscans (Gray Friars), Carmelites (White Friars), and Augustinians (Austin Friars), and the Servites; ... (2) the lesser orders, of which the Minims, Third Order Regular of Saint Francis, Capuchins, Discalced Carmelites, Discalced Trinitarians, and Order of Penance (in Italy, Scalzetti) are foremost
Madeleine Sophie Barat, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Dionysius, Saint - Saint Denis, Bishop of Paris, often wrongly confused with Dionysius the Areopagite, was born in Italy according to Saint Gregory of Tours
Denis, Saint - Saint Denis, Bishop of Paris, often wrongly confused with Dionysius the Areopagite, was born in Italy according to Saint Gregory of Tours
Domenico Ghirlandajo - Painter, born Florence, Italy, 1449; died there, January 11, 1494
John Viii, Pope - Born in Rome, Italy; died there
Innocent ii, Pope - Born at Rome, Italy as Gregorio Papareschi; died there
Hre - From the first, it was an abstract concept; the relationship between Pope and Emperor was defined in various ways at different times, and but seldom agreed to by both; even the territorial extent of the Empire was always vague, though it may be stated roughly as comprising: all the German-speaking lands in Europe; certain territories to the west of these; and a shadowy claim, never substantiated, to the whole of Italy, though at one period the emperors had a firm hold on Sicily and resided there
Carlovingian Schools - Through the influence of Alcuin, Theodulf, Lupus, Rhabanus Maurus, and others, the Carlovingian revival spread to Rheims, Auxerre, Laon, Chartres, southern Germany, Switzerland, and northern Italy
Chaucer, Geoffrey - Serving as a page at court, he was later sent to Italy on a diplomatic mission, which greatly influenced his literary career
Three Taverns - Baedeker, Southern Italy and Sicily15, London, 1908, p
Creed, Athanasian - It was in common use in some parts of Italy in 960, and was received at Rome about 1014
Holy Roman Empire - From the first, it was an abstract concept; the relationship between Pope and Emperor was defined in various ways at different times, and but seldom agreed to by both; even the territorial extent of the Empire was always vague, though it may be stated roughly as comprising: all the German-speaking lands in Europe; certain territories to the west of these; and a shadowy claim, never substantiated, to the whole of Italy, though at one period the emperors had a firm hold on Sicily and resided there
Adria - It was only later, with the growth of the Syracusan colonies on the coasts of Italy and Illyria, that the name ‘Hadria’ came to include the whole Adriatic, and even then, at first, it was the practice to call the southernmost part the Ionian Sea
Giovanni de Rossi - Christian archaeologist, born Rome, Italy, 1822; died Castel Gandolfo, 1894
Gregorio Papareschi - Born at Rome, Italy as Gregorio Papareschi; died there
Assumptionists - These institutions were all closed but the Assumptionists have opened similar ones in Belgium, England, Italy, the United States, and Chile
Augustinians of the Assumption - These institutions were all closed but the Assumptionists have opened similar ones in Belgium, England, Italy, the United States, and Chile
Barat, Madeleine Sophie, Saint - During her life Mother Barat established over 80 foundations in France, North America, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, Algiers, England, Ireland, Spain, Holland, Germany, South America, Austria, and Poland
Empire, Holy Roman - From the first, it was an abstract concept; the relationship between Pope and Emperor was defined in various ways at different times, and but seldom agreed to by both; even the territorial extent of the Empire was always vague, though it may be stated roughly as comprising: all the German-speaking lands in Europe; certain territories to the west of these; and a shadowy claim, never substantiated, to the whole of Italy, though at one period the emperors had a firm hold on Sicily and resided there
Siena, Italy, City of - It was finally incorporated into Tuscany in 1557, and annexed to the kingdom of Italy in 1860
William Durandus the Elder - 1237;died Rome, Italy, 1296
Ghirlandajo, Domenico Bigordi - Painter, born Florence, Italy, 1449; died there, January 11, 1494
Eleutherius, Saint - Saint Denis, Bishop of Paris, often wrongly confused with Dionysius the Areopagite, was born in Italy according to Saint Gregory of Tours
Rusticus, Saint - Saint Denis, Bishop of Paris, often wrongly confused with Dionysius the Areopagite, was born in Italy according to Saint Gregory of Tours
Liguorians - Society of missionary priests founded, 1732, by Saint Alphonsus Mary Liguori, at Scala, Italy, for the purpose of laboring among the neglected country people in the neighborhood of Naples. By 1823 ten houses had been opened in different parts of Southern Italy and Sicily
Charles Borromeo, Saint - Cardinal-Priest of the title of Saint Prassede, and Archbishp of Milan, born Arona, Italy, 1538; died Milan, Italy, 1584
Redemptorists - Society of missionary priests founded, 1732, by Saint Alphonsus Mary Liguori, at Scala, Italy, for the purpose of laboring among the neglected country people in the neighborhood of Naples. By 1823 ten houses had been opened in different parts of Southern Italy and Sicily
Myra - Instead of sailing straight for Italy, and, in doing so, contending with the westerly winds which prevail in the Eastern Mediterranean during the summer months, it was better seamanship to make for the S. Paul from Caesarea found an Alexandrian corn-ship in the harbour of Myra, about to continue her course to Italy, this was no surprising occurrence
Catholic And Protestant Countries Compared - ... POLITICS Forgetting the earlier history of Europe, proponents of this claim used to point to the supremacy of England, Germany, the United States, and the secondary position of France, Italy, Spain, and the South and Central American republics. England and the United States today associate with themselves France, Italy, and Japan, and of these the first two are among the Catholic nations, and the last is non-Christian, clear evidence of the lack of relation between religious belief and political power. The invention of power machinery and the adaptability of these countries to its use, made of them typically commercial peoples, while France, Italy, and other countries remain typically agricultural
Adria - ’ In later times the name ‘Adria’ was applied to the whole basin between Italy and Illyria, while the ‘Ionian Sea’ came to mean the outer basin, south of the Strait of Otranto. ‘With the accuracy of a geographer, he distinguishes the Gulf of Adria from the Sea of Adria; thus, in enumerating the boundaries of Italy, he tells us that it is bounded on one side by the shores of the Gulf of Adria, and on the south by the shores of the Adria (iii. He further informs us that Italy is bounded on the south by the Adriatic Sea (14), that the Peloponnesus is bounded on the west and south by the Adriatic Sea (16), and that Crete is bounded on the west by the Adriatic Sea (17)’ (Smith, Vayage and Shipwreck of St
Michael, Saint - Feast, Roman Calendar, September 29,; additional feast, May 8, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy
Michael the Archangel - Feast, Roman Calendar, September 29,; additional feast, May 8, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy
Frederick Barbarossa - He succeeded in recovering the royal influence in the selection of bishops, but his attempt to obtain the incomes from vacant benefices in northern Italy, and thereby prove his superiority over the pope, failed
Frederick i - He succeeded in recovering the royal influence in the selection of bishops, but his attempt to obtain the incomes from vacant benefices in northern Italy, and thereby prove his superiority over the pope, failed
Dyck, Anthony Van - Five years in Italy, 1621-1626, matured and beautified his art, and his portraits of Genoese nobility done during this period are among his finest paintings
Dyck, Anthoon Van - Five years in Italy, 1621-1626, matured and beautified his art, and his portraits of Genoese nobility done during this period are among his finest paintings
Otto i, Emperor - Directing his efforts towards the establishment of a strong central power, he finally triumphed over the particularism of the nobles, thus preparing for a reorganization of the constitution, and extending his influence over France, Burgundy, and Italy, then in a demoralized condition
Otto the Great - Directing his efforts towards the establishment of a strong central power, he finally triumphed over the particularism of the nobles, thus preparing for a reorganization of the constitution, and extending his influence over France, Burgundy, and Italy, then in a demoralized condition
Florence, Council of - The Seventeenth Æcumenical Council (1438-1445), held in the pontificate of Pope Eugene IV, first in the city of Ferrara and later at Florence, Italy
Louis Hennepin - 1640;died probably Rome, Italy, 1701
Nicholas Breakspear - 1100at Abbot's Langley, Hertfordshire, England as Nicholas Breakspear; died at Anagni, Italy
Siren - ) One of three sea nymphs, - or, according to some writers, of two, - said to frequent an island near the coast of Italy, and to sing with such sweetness that they lured mariners to destruction
Archangel, Michael the - Feast, Roman Calendar, September 29,; additional feast, May 8, the Apparition of Michael, which took place on Monte Gargano in southeastern part of Italy
Andrew, Saint - Relics in cathedral of Amalfi, Italy
Anselm, Saint - Confessor, Doctor of the Church, born Aosta, Italy, 1033; died Canterbury, England, 1109
Barbarossa, Frederick - He succeeded in recovering the royal influence in the selection of bishops, but his attempt to obtain the incomes from vacant benefices in northern Italy, and thereby prove his superiority over the pope, failed
Anthony Van Dyck - Five years in Italy, 1621-1626, matured and beautified his art, and his portraits of Genoese nobility done during this period are among his finest paintings
Anthoon Van Dyck - Five years in Italy, 1621-1626, matured and beautified his art, and his portraits of Genoese nobility done during this period are among his finest paintings
Apostleship of the Sea - Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the world, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
Esser, Thomas - Bishop, born Burtscheid, Germany, April 7, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1926
Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi - Painter, born Florence, Italy, March 1, 1445; died there, May 17, 1510
Adrian iv, Pope - 1100at Abbot's Langley, Hertfordshire, England as Nicholas Breakspear; died at Anagni, Italy
Colony - , gave his soldiers lands in Italy and transferred most of the inhabitants there to other quarters including Philippi
Sandro Botticelli - Painter, born Florence, Italy, March 1, 1445; died there, May 17, 1510
Hennepin, Louis - 1640;died probably Rome, Italy, 1701
Thomas Esser - Bishop, born Burtscheid, Germany, April 7, 1850; died Rome, Italy, 1926
Sea, Apostleship of the - Apostleship publicity, broadcast in many languages to the Catholic press throughout the world, has results in the formation of national section in Holland and Spain, regional headquarters in Australia, Canada, India, Italy, New Zealand, and South America
Patara - The prevailing winds in this part of the Mediterranean are from the west (especially in the autumn), and ships sailing from the Ægean or from Italy to Phœnicia or Egypt would often risk the voyage straight across the sea from Patara
Travel - Englishmen travel to France and Italy
Patrocius, a Martyr - An army, however, shortly afterwards invaded Italy, and brought back an identical copy of the Acts, thus proving the good faith of the priest
Nicetius, Archbaptist of Treves - His orthodoxy is illustrated by two extant letters: one from him to Clodosinda, the wife of Alboin the Lombard, urging her to turn her husband to Catholicism; the other to the emperor Justinian, whose lapse in his latter days into a form of Eutychianism, Nicetius declares, is lamented by all Italy, Africa, Spain, and Gaul ( Patr. For his architectural undertakings he summoned workmen from Italy (Rufus, Ep
Art, Christian - Basilicas in Rome, Asia Minor, or northern Africa; Byzantine edifices of Constantinople, Italy, or France; Romanesque churches in southern Europe; Norman in France and England; marvels of Gothic architecture which were the glory of the 13th century, as the cathedrals at Chartres, Rheims, York, or Cologne; Renaissance churches, like Saint Peter's in Rome, which adapted the classic styles to the uses of Christianity; even the over-elaborate Barocco edifices; all these still testify to the fact that the glorification of religion was the chief preoccupation of artist and artisan almost to the 17th century. In medieval France sculpture and stained glass achieved what painting did in Italy, and religious truth was taught in chiseled portico or glowing window. In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood. The English Preraphaelites were inspired by the religious ideais of medieval Italy, and in our own day an important movement in ecclesiastical art is sponsored by the Benedictines of Beuron
Christian Art - Basilicas in Rome, Asia Minor, or northern Africa; Byzantine edifices of Constantinople, Italy, or France; Romanesque churches in southern Europe; Norman in France and England; marvels of Gothic architecture which were the glory of the 13th century, as the cathedrals at Chartres, Rheims, York, or Cologne; Renaissance churches, like Saint Peter's in Rome, which adapted the classic styles to the uses of Christianity; even the over-elaborate Barocco edifices; all these still testify to the fact that the glorification of religion was the chief preoccupation of artist and artisan almost to the 17th century. In medieval France sculpture and stained glass achieved what painting did in Italy, and religious truth was taught in chiseled portico or glowing window. In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood. The English Preraphaelites were inspired by the religious ideais of medieval Italy, and in our own day an important movement in ecclesiastical art is sponsored by the Benedictines of Beuron
Sculpture - Basilicas in Rome, Asia Minor, or northern Africa; Byzantine edifices of Constantinople, Italy, or France; Romanesque churches in southern Europe; Norman in France and England; marvels of Gothic architecture which were the glory of the 13th century, as the cathedrals at Chartres, Rheims, York, or Cologne; Renaissance churches, like Saint Peter's in Rome, which adapted the classic styles to the uses of Christianity; even the over-elaborate Barocco edifices; all these still testify to the fact that the glorification of religion was the chief preoccupation of artist and artisan almost to the 17th century. In medieval France sculpture and stained glass achieved what painting did in Italy, and religious truth was taught in chiseled portico or glowing window. In Italy and Germany, too, sculpture had its place, and the names of such artists as Donatello, the Pisani, Ghiberti, Della Robbia, Veit Stoss, Peter Vischer, and Adam Krafft are associated with carved ornamentation, baptismal fonts, bronze doors and tombs, altars of stone or wood. The English Preraphaelites were inspired by the religious ideais of medieval Italy, and in our own day an important movement in ecclesiastical art is sponsored by the Benedictines of Beuron
Thessalonica - An important city of the Roman province Macedonia, situated on the Via Egnatia, the overland route from Italy to the E
Birgitta, Saint - 1303near Upsala, Sweden; died July 23, 1373 at Rome, Italy
Canonesses Regular - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canonesses Regular of Saint Augustine of the Congr - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canonesses Regular of the Lateran - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons, Augustinian - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons, Austin - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Canons Regular - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Carmelite Nuns - Tbe order was introduced into Italy, France, Belgium, England, and Ireland
Nicholas of Bari, Saint - He was buried in the cathedral at Myra, but in 1087 Italian merchants stole his body and carried it to Bari, Italy
Nicholas of Myra, Saint - He was buried in the cathedral at Myra, but in 1087 Italian merchants stole his body and carried it to Bari, Italy
Myra, Nicholas of, Saint - He was buried in the cathedral at Myra, but in 1087 Italian merchants stole his body and carried it to Bari, Italy
Bells - It is said that bells were introduced into Christian churches about the year 400 by Paulinus, Bishop of Nola, Italy
Beguines - They established foundations in Germany, France, and Italy and by the end of the 13th century practically every town had at least one beguinage
Guilds, Craft - The altered industrial and social conditions of Europe after the Reformation deprived the craft guilds of their power in England, while in France, Germany, and Italy, they were abolished by the authorities in the 18th and 19th centuries
Benedictus i, Pope - During his pontificate Italy was harassed by the invasion of the Lombards
Augustinian Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Augustinians Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Austin Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Bari, Nicholas of, Saint - He was buried in the cathedral at Myra, but in 1087 Italian merchants stole his body and carried it to Bari, Italy
Art, Byzantine - At the same time it was protected by the Church from the deadening influence of the Iconoclasts of the 8th and 9th centuries, and lived to inspire the art of Italy through such centers as Ravenna, Palermo, and Venice, and to influence all European art after the Crusades had made its treasures known
Aquila And Priscilla - were a married couple who came from Italy to Corinth after the emperor Claudius ordered Jews expelled from Rome, became Christians, and assisted Paul in his ministry
Geneva, Robert of - Bishop of Therouanne in 1361, Archbishop of Cambrai in 1368, papal legate in Upper Italy, created cardinal in 1371
Regular, Canonesses - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Regular, Canons - Engaged chiefly in educational work, they have convents in France, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg, Germany, Hungary, England, Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Canada
Robert of Geneva - Bishop of Therouanne in 1361, Archbishop of Cambrai in 1368, papal legate in Upper Italy, created cardinal in 1371
Sweden, Bridget of, Saint - 1303near Upsala, Sweden; died July 23, 1373 at Rome, Italy
Seat - Mansion residence dwelling abode as Italy the seat of empire
Vitus - After the boy had encountered much cruel suffering, they succeeded in carrying him over to Italy, where all three fell victims, either in Lucania or at Rome (Boll
Apostles Other Than the Twelve - Brazil... Saint Andeol Switzerland... Saint Andrew Corsini Florence, Italy... Saint Anschar Denmark... Sweden... the North (Scandinavia)... Saint Antoninus The Rouergue (district in southern France)... Astericus Anastasius, O. Armenia... Benignus, Saint Burgundy... Bernardine of Siena, Saint Italy ... Bernard of Menthon, Saint The Alps... Berno, Bishop of Mecklenburg, Order of Cistercians The Mecklenburg Wends... the Obotrites (Slav tribe)... Berthold, Bishop Livonia... Birinus, Saint Wessex, Saxon England... Blanchet, Augustin M, Bishop of Walla Walla Washington, United States... Boniface, Saint Germany... Boso, Bishop of Merseburg The Wends... Saint Bruno Ruthenia (Russia)... Saint Bruno of Querfurt Prussia... Cancer de Barbastro, Luis, O
Pelagius ii., Bishop of Rome - Italy, were besieging Rome. 4, 584, Pelagius sent him a letter to represent the lamentable condition of Italy and the imminent danger of Rome from the Lombard invasion; Longinus, the exarch at Ravenna, having been appealed to in vain. , for a large pecuniary reward to invade Italy and drive out the Lombards. ... On the retirement of Childebert from Italy, it appears that Smaragdus exarch of Ravenna had also concluded a truce with the Lombards (Epp
Alaric - Under the title of Master-General of Eastern Illyricum, 398, he became the ally of Arcadius and secretly planned the invasion of Italy. In the winter of 402 he crossed the Alps, was defeated by Stilicho at Pollentia on Easter Day 403, and driven from Italy. Stilicho's ruin and death in 408, the subsequent massacre of the Goths settled in Italy, and Honorius's impolitic refusal of Alaric's equitable terms, caused the second invasion of Italy, and the first siege of Rome, which ended in a capitulation. 7) mentions as a current story that a certain monk, on urging the king, then on his march through Italy, to spare the city, received the reply that he was not acting of his own accord, but that some one was persistently forcing him on and urging him to sack Rome
Angelus - The morning recital began at Parma, Italy, in 1318, as a prayer for peace
Oil of Saints - Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087
Manna Oil of Saints - Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087
Francis Gasquet - Cardinal and scholar; born London, 1846; died Rome, Italy, 1929
Jules Mazarin - Cardinal, and prime minister of France after Richelieu's death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France
Mazarin, Jules - Cardinal, and prime minister of France after Richelieu's death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France
Hippo, Augustine of, Saint - He went to Italy, 383, and taught rhetoric at Milan, where he was baptized by Ambrose, 387
Francis Borgia, Saint - Confessor, third general of the Society of Jesus, born Gandia, Spain, 1510; died Ferrara, Italy, 1572
Discalced Carmelite Order - Its mother-house is in Rome and is established in Spain, Italy, England, Ireland, Portugal, France, Belgium, Germany, Holland, Poland, Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia, Malta, Palestine, Syria, Mount Lebanon, Mesopotamia, Persia, British India (in the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin), Egypt, the United States, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia
Order of Discalced Carmelites - Its mother-house is in Rome and is established in Spain, Italy, England, Ireland, Portugal, France, Belgium, Germany, Holland, Poland, Hungary, Austria, Yugoslavia, Malta, Palestine, Syria, Mount Lebanon, Mesopotamia, Persia, British India (in the Kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin), Egypt, the United States, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia
Jeanne Marie Bouvier de la Motte Guyon - " She traveled over France and Italy, giving spiritual conferences with great success
Paper - From Egypt its use spread to other countries and it was the universal material for writing in general in Greece and Italy during the most flourishing periods of their literature
Fraternity - Italy, Spain, and Portugal, are the countries where are seen the greatest number of these fraternities, some of which assume the name of arch- fraternity
Familiars of the Inquisition - In some provinces of Italy they are call cross bearers; and in others the scholars of St
Gregory i, Pope Saint - Doctor of the Church; born in Rome, Italy, c
Gregory the Great, Pope Saint - Doctor of the Church; born in Rome, Italy, c
Augustine of Hippo, Saint - He went to Italy, 383, and taught rhetoric at Milan, where he was baptized by Ambrose, 387
Apostolic Schools - Within a decade there were schools at Amiens, Poitiers, and Bordeaux in France, Turin in Italy, and Turnhout in Belgium
Gasquet, Francis Aidan - Cardinal and scholar; born London, 1846; died Rome, Italy, 1929
Silk - Silk was first brought into Greece after Alexander's conquest of Persia, and came into Italy during the flourishing times of the Roman empire; but was long so dear in all these parts as to be worth its weight in gold
Schools, Apostolic - Within a decade there were schools at Amiens, Poitiers, and Bordeaux in France, Turin in Italy, and Turnhout in Belgium
Saints, Manna Oil of - Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087
Saints, Oil of - Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087
Order of Saint Benedict - The Benedictines, sometimes called Black Monks from their habit, were founded at Monte Cassino, Italy, by Benedict of Nursia, c529 The aim of the order is the personal sanctification of its members who may undertake any work provided it be compatible with living in community and the performance of Divine Office in choir. Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Benedictine Order - The Benedictines, sometimes called Black Monks from their habit, were founded at Monte Cassino, Italy, by Benedict of Nursia, c529 The aim of the order is the personal sanctification of its members who may undertake any work provided it be compatible with living in community and the performance of Divine Office in choir. Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Benedictines - The Benedictines, sometimes called Black Monks from their habit, were founded at Monte Cassino, Italy, by Benedict of Nursia, c529 The aim of the order is the personal sanctification of its members who may undertake any work provided it be compatible with living in community and the performance of Divine Office in choir. Since that time another revival has taken place, though later in the same century houses were closed in Spain, Italy, and France. The nuns engage principally in educational work, and have monasteries in the United States, British Isles, and Malta, Australia, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Holland, Italy, and Poland
Arians - ... Italy, Gaul and Spain, were also deeply infected with it; and towards the commencement of the sixth century, it was triumphant in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Europe; but it sunk almost at once when the Vandals were driven out of Africa, and the Goths out of Italy, by the arms of Justinian. However, it revived again in Italy, under the protection of the Lombards, in the seventh century, and was not extinguished till about the end of the eighth
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - He shortly recounts Alaric's invasion of Italy, and introduces the story of Attila's invasion of Gaul and defeat. At the close of the section he describes the subjugation of Italy by Odoacer and the deposition of Augustulus. The dealings of Theodoric with Zeno, his entrance into Italy and his victory over Odoacer are recounted. The outline of the fortunes of the Goths in Italy is related very briefly, and the work closes with the captivity of Vitigis, and another mention of the marriage of Mathasuentha with Germanus. The idea, therefore, that the Goths were equally learned and ancient must have been a support to him (and others like him) when Theodoric was ruling almost as a miniature emperor in Italy. This traditional belief in the empire and church was destined never to be altogether broken in Italy. After the issue of the Three Chapters by Justinian, which Vigilius apparently dared not sign when in Italy, the pope was summoned to Constantinople, which he reached on Christmas Day, 547. He was retained at Constantinople, or in the neighbourhood, for seven years, till he at last obtained permission from Justinian to return to Italy. His almost complete ignorance of the later and contemporary events in Italy is thus explained, and his detailed acquaintance, shewn in several passages, with the affairs of the empire accounted for
Mosaic - In the 11th century the Roman School of decorative mosaic was derived from Byzantium through Southern Italy
Montallegro - A sanctuary of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Liguria, Italy, near Rapallo, built about 1557
Kohlmann, Anthony - Educator and missionary, born Kaiserberg, Alsace, 1771; died Rome, Italy, 1836
Order de Santiago de la Espada - The order extended into Portugal, France, Italy, Hungary, and Palestine, and at one time comprised 83 commanderies, 2 cities, 178 boroughs and villages, 200 parishes, 5 hospitals, 5 convents and 1 college; it numbered 400 knights and could muster over 1000 lances
Order of Saint James of Compostela - The order extended into Portugal, France, Italy, Hungary, and Palestine, and at one time comprised 83 commanderies, 2 cities, 178 boroughs and villages, 200 parishes, 5 hospitals, 5 convents and 1 college; it numbered 400 knights and could muster over 1000 lances
Cassinese Congregation - This reform gradually spread to all the chief Benedictine monasteries in Italy, including Monte Cassino, Subiaco, Saint Paul's in Rome, Saint George's at Venice, La Cava, and Farfa
Chair of Peter - One of these phials, preserved in the cathedral treasury of Monza, Italy, had a label reading, "oleo de sede ubi prius sedit sanctus Petrus" (oils from the chair where Saint Peter first sat)
Holy Childhood, Association of the - At present the association is known throughout Austria, Asia, Africa, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Italy, Ireland, Malta, Norway, Oceania, Portugal, South America, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States
Flake - It is brought from Italy, and of a quality superior to common white lead
Silk - The silken textures of the East began to be imported into Italy in the early days of the Empire
Salmone - ) The ship's direct course from Myra to Italy after reaching Cnidus lay N
Association of the Holy Childhood - At present the association is known throughout Austria, Asia, Africa, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Greece, Holland, Italy, Ireland, Malta, Norway, Oceania, Portugal, South America, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States
Anthony Kohlmann - Educator and missionary, born Kaiserberg, Alsace, 1771; died Rome, Italy, 1836
Aquila - Aquila came thither, not long before, from Italy, being obliged to leave Rome upon the edict which the emperor Claudius had published, banishing the Jews from that city
Rubens, Peter Paul - He studied art from his fourteenth year and went to Italy in 1600 for eight years of study and travel, including a diplomatic mission to Spain
Magnentius, , Flavius Popilius, Emperor - Gaul and all the Western Empire, including Italy, Sicily, Spain, and Africa, submitted to the new emperor
Illyricum - Illyricum is a Latin word, and denotes the Roman province which extended along the Adriatic from Italy and Pannonia on the north to the province Macedonia on the south
Chittim - "Chittim" was applied subsequently to the other islands of the AEgean, and to the maritime mainlands of Greece and Italy
Adramyttium - Luke sailed from Caesarea by Sidon and under the lee (to the east) of Cyprus to Myra in Lycia, where they joined a corn-ship of Alexandria bound for Italy (Acts 27:2-6)
San Marino - Republic within Italy covering about 24 square miles
Monasteries, Suppression of - Besides the extensive losses suffered by the Church as a result of the Reformation, civilauthorities of certain European countries, desirous of the lands and income enjoyed by the religious orders, carried on a systematic seizure of monastic properties, notably in Germany, the Iberian peninsula, Italy, and England. ... In Italy, Leopold, later Emperor Leopold II, sought the suppression of the monastic orders in the 18th century
Fabiola, a Noble Roman Lady - She supported monasteries in various parts of Italy and the adjacent islands, and joined Pammachius in the institution of a hospital (νοσοκομεῖον ), where she gathered in the sick and outcasts, and tended them with her own hands. She found Rome and Italy too small for her charities, and was purposing some long journey or change of habitation when death overtook her a
Empire, Byzantine - His general, Belisarius, defeated the Persians and made conquests in Africa and Italy, and in 538 Saint Sophia was erected. His successor, Constantine X, diminished the military forces, causing the loss of Italy, Croatia, Dalmatia, and Asia Minor
Renaissance - Among the famous architects and sculptors of the period were: ...
Bramante

Brunellesco

Ciuffagni

Donatello

Ghiberti

Luca della Robbia

Michelangelo

Michelozzo

Nicola Lamberti

Quercia

Rossellino

Sansovrno

Turini

Vecchietta
The Mother of God became the particular source of inspiration for painters, among whom may be mentioned: ...
Bellino

Botticelli

Correggio

Fouquet

Fra Angelico

Fra Bartolommeo

Fra Filippino

Mazzoni

Michelangelo

Raphael

Rogier van der Weyden

Titian

da Vinci
The Renaissance as it manifested itself in the other countries was not a rediscovery of their past, as in Italy. Among the various scholars and religious leaders of the Renaissance outside of Italy may be mentioned: ...
Beza

Calvin

Casaubon

Chaucer

Cujacius

Grocyn

Linacre

Salmasius

Wyclif
The Church did not oppose the return to classical literature, for she herself preserved the classics, nor did she oppose the return to the cult of form and beauty
Suppression of Monasteries - Besides the extensive losses suffered by the Church as a result of the Reformation, civilauthorities of certain European countries, desirous of the lands and income enjoyed by the religious orders, carried on a systematic seizure of monastic properties, notably in Germany, the Iberian peninsula, Italy, and England. ... In Italy, Leopold, later Emperor Leopold II, sought the suppression of the monastic orders in the 18th century
Luke, Gospel of, - " ch, ( Luke 1:4 ) This Theophilus was probably a native of Italy and perhaps an inhabitant of Rome, in tracing St. Paul's journey to Rome, places which an Italian might be supposed not to know are described minutely, (Acts 27:8,12,16 ) but when he comes to Sicily and Italy this is neglected
Silverius, Bishop of Rome - Agapetus having died at Constantinople when about to return to Italy (on April 22, according to Anastasius) in 536, Liberates tells us ( Breviar. Vigilius, on his arrival in Italy, found Belisarius at Naples, to whom he communicated the commands of Theodora (Liberatus, Breviar
Bentivoglio, Annetta - ... Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ... Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact... Monastery of Saint Clare... 509 South Kentucky Avenue... Evansville, IN 47714, USA ... Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana... Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska... Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada... Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ... - Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Maria Magdalena Bentivoglio - ... Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ... Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact... Monastery of Saint Clare... 509 South Kentucky Avenue... Evansville, IN 47714, USA ... Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana... Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska... Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada... Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ... - Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Leo Iii, Pope Saint - Born and died in Rome, Italy
Order, Carthusian - There are now houses in Spain, Italy, England, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland
Fourteen Holy Helpers - The cult spread rapidly to Bohemia, Moravia, Galicia, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, and America
Carthusian Order - There are now houses in Spain, Italy, England, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland
Mary Magdalena Bentivoglio - ... Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ... Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact... Monastery of Saint Clare... 509 South Kentucky Avenue... Evansville, IN 47714, USA ... Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana... Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska... Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada... Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ... - Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Mary Magdalen of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ... Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ... Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact... Monastery of Saint Clare... 509 South Kentucky Avenue... Evansville, IN 47714, USA ... Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana... Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska... Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada... Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ... - Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Loyola, Ignatius, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Ignatius Loyola, Saint - Confessor, founder of the Society of Jesus, born Loyola Castle, Guipuzcoa, Spain, 1491; died Rome, Italy, 1556
Annetta Bentivoglio - ... Born July 29, 1824 at Rome, Italy as Annetta Bentivoglio ... Died August 18, 1905 of natural causes; during the last half hour of her life witnesses say that her wall crucifix gave off light which shone on her; body incorrupt after 30 years ... Venerated; pending; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Mother Mary Magdalena, contact... Monastery of Saint Clare... 509 South Kentucky Avenue... Evansville, IN 47714, USA ... Additional Information Monastery of Saint Clare, Evansville, Indiana... Poor Clare Sisters, Omaha, Nebraska... Saint Clare's Monastery, Duncan, British Columbia, Canada... Readings All my life I have asked God for crosses and now that He has sent them, why should I not be glad? ... - Mother Mary Magdalena ...
Baronius, Cesare - Born in 1538 in Sora, Naples; died in 1607 in Rome, Italy
Ship - Paul's time, vessels passing from Palestine to Italy, sometimes wintered on the way! ... Acts 27:12 28:11
Malchus, a Hermit in Syria - of Antioch, in whose company Jerome came from Italy in 374; and the story of the aged hermit confirmed Jerome in his desire for the life in the desert, on which he entered in 375 (Hieron
Palladias, Bishop of Ireland - His birthplace is placed by some in England, by others in Gaul or Italy; some even make him a Greek (see Ussher, Eccles
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - Cassiodorus (or rather, Cassiodorius ) Magnus Aurelius, senator, and chief minister to the Ostrogothic princes of Italy, born at Scylacium (Squillace) in Bruttium, 469–470, of a noble, wealthy, and patriotic family. His learning and accomplishments early attracted the notice of Odoacer, the first barbarian ruler of Italy, by whom he was made "comes privatarum," and subsequently"comes sacrarum largitionum" ( Var. It would seem to have been the ambition of Cassiodorus, whose genius for diplomacy was consummate, to bring about a fusion between the Arian conquerors and the conquered Catholic population of Italy, to establish friendly relations with the Eastern empire, and possibly to create at Rome a peaceful centre to which the several barbaric kingdoms which had established themselves in Gaul, Spain, and Africa might be attracted. ... Of his extant writings, the twelve Books of Varieties, consisting principally of letters, edicts, and rescripts, are the only work of real importance; apart, however, from the study of these pages, it is hardly possible to obtain a true knowledge of the Italy of the 6th cent
Otto Eduard Leopold Von Bismarck - In 1882 he had formed the Triple Alliance of Austria, Germany, and Italy
Metal-Work in the Service of the Church - During the Renaissance the most distinguished sculptors in Italy worked in bronze
Christendom - The Franco-Norman civilization which developed in France, England, and southern Italy, created Gothic architecture and epic and lyric poetry
Communion With Christ: Joy of - Gothard pass, on your way to Italy, than you perceive that, beyond all question, you are on the sunny side of the Alps
Vincentius - All Rome and Italy, he reported, had been delivered; and his praise of Theophilus of Alexandria as having by his letter to the pope Anastasius procured this deliverance is communicated to that prelate in Jerome's letter ( Ep
Luke, Saint - Relics at Padua, Italy
Cauda - Paul was sailing for Italy had rounded Cape Lithinos (now Cape Matala), four or five miles west from Fair Havens, and was making in a W
Basilians - In Italy and Sicily the monasteries of Basilians were always in communion with the Holy See
Sisters of Saint Joseph - The congregation spread over the whole of France, to Savoy, Italy, and Corsica, with numerous hospitals, schools, and orphanages
Nicolaus, Bishop of Myra - His relics were translated in the middle ages to Barri in Italy, whence he is often styled Nicolaus of Barri
Colony - ’ Colonia (from colonus, ‘settler,’ ‘husbandman,’ from colere, ‘to cultivate’) was a word applied by the Romans to a body (usually 300) of their citizen-soldiers (in earlier days the two terms were convertible), transferred from the city of Rome itself to some outlying part of Italy or (later) to some other land. (Kornemann’s statement that there is no up-to-date comprehensive work on coloniae outside Italy appears to be still true
Seismology - Ufficio Central di Meteorologia e Geodinamico, he located as many as 67 seismoscopes in the several meteorological stations throughout Italy and founded the fortnightly Supplemento on earthquakes of the Annali in 1889. Six of these stations are supervised by the Philippine Weather Bureau, two are located in Spain, and one in the following countries: Syria, England, Cuba, Hungary, Australia, Madagascar, Italy, Bolivia, Colombia, and Canada
Melania, a Roman Lady - In 397 she returned with Rufinus to Italy, to confirm her granddaughter Melania the Younger in the practice of asceticism. " In 408, Italy being threatened with the invasion of Alaric, and her son Publicola having died, she determined to leave Rome
Province - It is only because it came to be generally associated with the rule of large districts out of Italy, that it ultimately obtained the territorial sense of ‘subjugated territory out of Italy under Roman government’ (R. For the first two and a half centuries of the Republic expansion had been confined to Italy (see Roman Empire). ), they found it necessary to maintain a stand beyond the bounds of Italy. Immunity of cities was an exceptional privilege in the Empire, belonging exclusively, or almost exclusively, to coloniae, in virtue of the fact that they, like the inhabitants of Italy, owned their soil
Flavius Valerius Constantinus - With a small army Constantine invaded Italy
Forty Hours' Adoration - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Devotion - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Prayer - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarantore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarant' Ore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Devotion, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Daniel o'Connell - Orator and leader, surnamed "The Liberator"; born Carhen, County Kerry, Ireland, August 6, 1775; died Genoa, Italy, 1847
Quietists - Molinos had numerous disciples in Italy, Spain, France, and the Netherlands
o'Connell, Daniel - Orator and leader, surnamed "The Liberator"; born Carhen, County Kerry, Ireland, August 6, 1775; died Genoa, Italy, 1847
Great, Constantine the - With a small army Constantine invaded Italy
Anthimus, Bishop of Tyana - In 372 he joined in subscribing a circular letter addressed by the Oriental bishops to those of Italy and Gaul ( Ep
Aurelian, Roman Emporor - The orthodox bishops appealed to the emperor to settle whose the property was, and he adjudged it to belong to those to whom the bishops in Italy and in Rome had addressed their epistles (Eus
Felix (174), Bishop of Tubzoca - To him, upon his final refusal, Felix and his companions were delivered for transporation into Italy, arriving after four days' sail in Sicily
Basilica, Saint Peter's - Church located on the site of the Neronian circus in Rome, Italy
Henry iv, Emperor - When the German nobles decided to elect another emperor, Henry fled to Italy where he penitently craved forgiveness from Gregory at Canossa; legend says that he walked barefoot to Rome
Adoration, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
he'Brews, Epistle to the - --It was probably written in Italy, while Paul was a prisoner at Rome
Saint Peter's Basilica - Church located on the site of the Neronian circus in Rome, Italy
Visit - Men visit England, France or Italy in their travels
Valentinianus Iii - 63, 64) were issued for the other cities of Italy and for Africa in 425, and also edicts (lib
Paulicians - Their first migration was into Italy; whence, in process of time, they sent colonies into almost all the other provinces of Europe, and formed gradually a considerable number of religious assemblies, who adhered to their doctrine, and who were afterwards persecuted with the utmost vehemence by the Roman pontiffs. In Italy they were called Patarmi, from a certain place called Pataria, being a part of the city of Milan where they held their assemblies: and Gathari, or Gazari, from Gazaria, or the Lesser Tartary
Procopius of Caesarea - A mutiny of the soldiers drove him in 536 to Sicily, which Belisarius was then engaged in reducing, and he accompanied the latter into Italy in his campaign against the Goths. ... His works consist of a history of the Persian war from 408 to 549; a history of the war with the Vandals in Africa from 395 to 545; a history of the Gothic wars in Italy from 487 to 574; a work de Aedificiis Justiniani Imp
Rufinus of Aquileia - Italy; baptized at Aquileia c. 390; in Italy, mostly at Aquileia, 397–408; died in Sicily, 410. But when the "subitus turbo" drove Jerome to the East, Rufinus left Italy in the company of Melania for Egypt and visited the monasteries of Nitria (Pallad. 378) that "Bonosus of Italy, and Florentius and Rufinus at Jerusalem, are held in special estimation as monks"; and when he settled in Palestine in 386 had frequent literary intercourse with Rufinus and his monks. In 397, the year when Rufinus quitted Palestine, they met (probably with many friends on both sides) at a solemn communion service in the Church of the Resurrection, joined hands in renewal of friendship, and, on Rufinus's setting out for Italy with Melania, Jerome accompanied him some little way, perhaps as far as Joppa. ... Italy, 397–409. —Melania returned to Italy in order to promote ascetic practices in her family. ... He had brought many works of the Eastern church writers which were but little known in Italy; and his friends were eager to know their contents. Meanwhile he had a scholar named Macarius, who at Pinetum had been much exercised by speculations on Providence and Fate and in controversy with the many Mathematici (astrologists and necromancers) then in Italy. About the time Rufinus arrived he dreamed he saw a ship coming from the East to Italy which would bring him aid, and this he interpreted of Rufinus. 24) and with Eusebius of Cremona had gone through the chief cities of Italy (Ruf
Leprosy - Bad nutrition and insanitary conditions are favorable to its generation and propagation, and it is endemic in certain localities, as parts of Africa, Arabia, China, Japan, India, Italy, Spain, etc
Monks, White - They are in England, Ireland, Italy, Austria, Germany, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bohemia, and Poland
Order of Citeaux - They are in England, Ireland, Italy, Austria, Germany, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bohemia, and Poland
Tiberias - There were in it a theatre for the performance of comedies, a forum, a stadium, a palace roofed with gold in imitation of those in Italy, statues of the Roman gods, and busts of the deified emperors
Dung - Italy (Luke 13:8)
Whippers - It had its rise in Italy in the year 1260: its author was one Rainer, a hermit; and it was propagated from hence through almost all the countries of Europe
Dionysius, Saint, Apostle of France - This is the tradition of the Greek church, and of those of Gaul, Germany, Spain, and Italy
Army - One of these cohorts was named the Italian, Acts 10:1, because the soldiers in it were from Italy
White Monks - They are in England, Ireland, Italy, Austria, Germany, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bohemia, and Poland
Western Schism - This exile from the Eternal City met with opposition, especially in Italy where the people clamored for the return of the sovereign pontiff
Schism, Western - This exile from the Eternal City met with opposition, especially in Italy where the people clamored for the return of the sovereign pontiff
Province - With the extension of the Roman Empire, and the consequently much increased number of spheres of duty outside Rome and Italy, the word came gradually to have a territorial application also. All the rest of the Roman world outside Italy, namely, three-fourths of the whole, was made up of Imperial provinces, including the following: Egypt (where the Emperors, as successors of the Ptolemys, ruled as kings), Judæa, Syria-Cilicia-Phœnice, Galatia (established b
Maximus Magnus, Christian Emperor in the West - Hodgkin, Italy and her Invaders (Oxf. A second ambassador Domninus was sent, and was entirely deceived by the soft words of Maximus, who persuaded him that Valentinian had no better friend than himself, and cajoled him into taking back into Italy a part of his army, under pretence of serving against the barbarians who were invading Pannonia. Having thus cleverly got his soldiers across the Alps, he followed rapidly in person, and entered Italy as an invader (Zos. Maximus was thus left in possession of Italy
Citizenship - there were many country towns of Italy (municipia) which possessed citizen rights, and, as the result of the Social War and the Lex Iulia (90 b. ), all peoples in Italy south of the Alps obtained the Roman citizenship. Such communities were created also outside Italy by Julius Caesar, Claudius, Vespasian, and others, until in a
Heliodorus, Bishop of Altinum - Jerome wrote to him on his return to Italy a letter, reproaching him for turning back from the more perfect service, which afterwards had a great effect in furthering asceticism and became so celebrated that a Roman lady, Fabiola, knew it by heart (Hieron
Fee - This word, fee, inland, or an estate in trust, originated among the descendants of the northern conquerors of Italy, but it originated in the south of Europe
Vinegar - They make great use of it in Spain and Italy, in harvest time
Roman Rite - It is the exclusive rite of the Latin Patriarchate and with the exception of Milan, Toledo, and the Byzantine Churches of Southern Italy, Sicily, and Corsica, is used throughout all of Western Europe, and in all countries colonized from there
Rite, Roman - It is the exclusive rite of the Latin Patriarchate and with the exception of Milan, Toledo, and the Byzantine Churches of Southern Italy, Sicily, and Corsica, is used throughout all of Western Europe, and in all countries colonized from there
Laurentius, an Antipope - At length it was agreed to refer the settlement to Theodoric the Ostrogoth, now reigning at Ravenna as king of Italy, and he pronounced Symmachus the lawful pope (Anastas
Titus (Emperor) - His visit to other Syrian cities was made all the more pleasant by the report of the splendid reception which his father had received in Italy. Titus also superintended road-building in Italy, Dalmatia, and Numidia, as inscriptions prove. To this year belong also various improvements to roads in Italy, Spain, Galatia, and Lycia. In the year 81 we learn of further repairs to aqueducts in Italy, and of new roads in Cyprus
Order of Friars Minor Capuchins - " So rapidly did it grow, admitting the Observants in great numbers, that two Briefs issued by Pope Paul III (1534,1535) forbade the further reception of Observants before their next general chapter, and in 1537 they were forbidden to establish houses outside Italy; but in 1574 this was revoked by Pope Gregory XIII who accorded them the right to extend their provinces
Capuchin Friars Minor - " So rapidly did it grow, admitting the Observants in great numbers, that two Briefs issued by Pope Paul III (1534,1535) forbade the further reception of Observants before their next general chapter, and in 1537 they were forbidden to establish houses outside Italy; but in 1574 this was revoked by Pope Gregory XIII who accorded them the right to extend their provinces
Seleucia - 7), but only for smaller craft, while the harbour of Seleucia received the largest transport ships of Egypt, Phcenicia, Cyprus, Asia Minor, Greece, and Italy
Penitents - Penitents of Orvieto, are an order of nuns instituted by Antony Simoncelli, a gentleman of Orvieto, in Italy
Gallicanism - " The Council of Pistoia, 1786, tried to introduce it into Italy
Cenchreae - ‘Cenchreae,’ says Strabo, ‘serves for the trade with Asia, and Lechaeum for that with Italy’ (viii
Felix (4) iv, Bishop of Rome - , had died in prison at Ravenna, into which he had been thrown by Theodoric the Ostrogoth, who then ruled the West as king of Italy
Marcionites - Or MARCIONISTS, Marconistae, a very ancient and popular sect of heretics, who, in the time of Epiphanius, were spread over Italy, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Arabia, Persia, and other countries: they were thus denominated from their author Marcion
Army - One of these cohorts was named the Italian, (Acts 10:1 ) as consisting of volunteers from Italy
Majorianus, Julius Valerius - ... On Majorian's return to Italy in 461 Ricimer excited a mutiny in the army against him at Tortona, forced him to abdicate on Aug
Melania the Younger, Daughter of Publicola - She gave away those in Gaul and Italy, but kept those in Sicily, Spain, and Africa; and this led to the attempt of the people of Hippo to induce PINIANUS to become a priest of their church
Sigismundus, Saint - He married Ostrogotha, the daughter of Theodoric the Ostrogothic king of Italy (Jornandes in Bouquet, ii
Painting, Religious - It was carried into Italy by the Crusades and there its formalism was gradually replaced by more natural treatment. ... Paralleling the development of painting in Italy we have the schools that flourished north of the Alps
Religious Painting - It was carried into Italy by the Crusades and there its formalism was gradually replaced by more natural treatment. ... Paralleling the development of painting in Italy we have the schools that flourished north of the Alps
Leo Xiii, Pope - (Gioacchino Vincenzo Pecci) (1878-1903) Born Carpineto, near Anagni, Italy, 1810; died Rome
Libraries - Among the famous libraries in Europe may be mentioned those of the monastic communities of Fulda, Corvey, and Saint Gall in Germany, Monte Cassino in Italy, and Fleury and Cluny in France
Philippi - , the victorious Octavian dispossessed the supporters of Antony from Italy, but he allowed him to settle in places like Philippi
Vitellius - 34) and Sextilia, was born either at Luceria or at Nuceria (in Italy) on 7th or 24th September a
Alexandria - ship bound for Italy; in Acts 27:10 Paul speaks of the "lading," without stating what it was; but in Acts 27:38 it comes out casually
Architecture, Ecclesiastical - ...

Renaissance, which began in Italy in the early part of the 15th century, an example of which is Saint Peter's, Rome
Galla Placidia, Daughter of Theodosius i - After the death of Ataulphus, Placidiareturned to Italy, a
Ecclesiastical Architecture - ...

Renaissance, which began in Italy in the early part of the 15th century, an example of which is Saint Peter's, Rome
Ennodius (1) Magnus Felix, Bishop of Pavia - In 489, the year in which Theodoric invaded Italy, his aunt died, and he was saved from beggary by marriage ( Eucharist
Armenian Church - In 1667, a certain patriarch of the lesser Armenia visited Rome, and made a profession of faith which was considered orthodox, and procured him a cordial reception, with the hope of reconciling the Armenian Christians to the Roman church; but before he got out of Italy, it was found he had prevaricated, and still persisted in the errors of his church
Victorius of Aquitaine - Victorius's cycle seems thereafter to have become disused in Italy, but lingered much later in parts of Gaul
Investiture - But Henry IV of Germany ignored the prohibition of Gregory and continued to appoint bishops in Germany and Italy until finally Gregory excommunicated him; Henry repented and was freed from the excommunication; but he firmly held to the right of investiture, until his death
Lazarists - During the lifetime of the founder establishments were made not only in France but also in Poland and in Italy, and the congregation undertook missionary work in Ireland, the Hebrides, Barbary, and Madagascar
Modernism - The movement was strong in Italy, and it affected many in Germany, France, and England
Tyrannus - The experience of moderns in southern countries confirms this: the early morning is the time for brain work in the South, as the young Julius Charles Hare and his brother found when resident as boys in Italy
Carnutum - Opened by him in 990, it drew scholars from every part of France, as well as Italy, Germany, and England, and became a center of classical scholarship, and a strong opponent of contemporary rationalistic tendencies
Chartres, France - Opened by him in 990, it drew scholars from every part of France, as well as Italy, Germany, and England, and became a center of classical scholarship, and a strong opponent of contemporary rationalistic tendencies
Architecture, Gothic - In Italy, Burgundy, Aquitaine, and Spain the fundamental principles of Gothic were never accepted, although it influenced decoration and design
Autricum - Opened by him in 990, it drew scholars from every part of France, as well as Italy, Germany, and England, and became a center of classical scholarship, and a strong opponent of contemporary rationalistic tendencies
Gothic Architecture - In Italy, Burgundy, Aquitaine, and Spain the fundamental principles of Gothic were never accepted, although it influenced decoration and design
Nero - From this time edicts were published against the Christians, and many martyrs suffered, especially in Italy
Vincentians - During the lifetime of the founder establishments were made not only in France but also in Poland and in Italy, and the congregation undertook missionary work in Ireland, the Hebrides, Barbary, and Madagascar
Pachomius, Saint - coast of Italy, near Spezia, claims that his body rests there
Justinianus i, Emperor - ... The success of his enterprise against the Vandals encouraged Justinian to attempt the recovery of Italy from the Ostrogoths, who had held it and Sicily since the invasion under Theodoric in 493–494. The emperors at Constantinople considered themselves, ever since the extinction of the Western branch of the empire in 476, de jure sovereigns of Italy and the whole West, regarding the Gothic kings partly as their lieutenants, partly as mere usurpers. Then he attacked Italy, occupying Rome in Dec. The Ostrogoths had shortly before risen against their king Theodahad, and chosen Witigis, whom Belisarius took at Ravenna and carried to Constantinople, leaving the imperial power supreme in Italy. Totila, whom the Goths chose in the room of Witigis, recovered fortress after fortress from the incompetent generals who succeeded Belisarius, till he was master of most part of Italy; and at length restored the Gothic kingdom to a better position than it had held since the death of Theodoric. But in 552 his army was defeated, and himself slain by Narses, and with him died the last hopes of the Gothic kingdom of Italy. After Narses had destroyed Butelin and his host in a great battle near Casilinum in Campania, 544, the small remains of the Gothic nation either passed into Spain and Gaul to mingle with other barbarians or were lost among the Roman population of Italy, which now was finally in Justinian's hands. It was, however, a desolated and depopulated Italy. The bishops of Africa led the opposition, and were largely supported by those of Italy, Gaul, Illyricum, and Dalmatia. Italy the bishops of Tuscany, the province of Milan, and Istria and Venetia, broke off communion with the pope
Charlemagne - Through French influence the Carlovingian legend spread to other countries; in Italy it inspired the Franco-Italian epics, and the "Reali di Francia" of Mignabotti, and culminated in the famous chivalrous epics of Boiardo and Ariosto; in Germany it appeared in the "Rolandslied" of Konrad der Pfaffe, "Karlmeinet," and the chap-books of the 15th century; in Scandinavia in the "Karlamagnus saga" (c
Charles the Great - Through French influence the Carlovingian legend spread to other countries; in Italy it inspired the Franco-Italian epics, and the "Reali di Francia" of Mignabotti, and culminated in the famous chivalrous epics of Boiardo and Ariosto; in Germany it appeared in the "Rolandslied" of Konrad der Pfaffe, "Karlmeinet," and the chap-books of the 15th century; in Scandinavia in the "Karlamagnus saga" (c
Syracuse - Baedeker, Southern Italy and Sicily15, 1908, pp
Attila, King And General of the Huns - In the spring of 452 Attila penetrated into Italy by the passes of the Julian Alps (Prosp. An embassy sent by the people and senate of Rome to endeavour to obtain Attila's peaceful evacuation of Italy met the invaders on the Mincio near Mantua and Vergil's farm
Army - Italy itself was garrisoned by the Praetorian cohorts (see Praetorium). ... The legions were recruited from the Roman citizens of Italy and the provinces
Monachism - This type of monasticism spread to Palestine, Syria, Italy, and Gaul, and later affected the independent growth of the religious life in Ireland, Wales, and Scotland
Monasticism - This type of monasticism spread to Palestine, Syria, Italy, and Gaul, and later affected the independent growth of the religious life in Ireland, Wales, and Scotland
Fratricelli - An enthusiastic sect of Franciscans, which arose in Italy, and particularly in the marquisate of Ancona, about the year 1294
Antioch - The largest city of the Roman empire after Rome in Italy and Alexandria in Egypt
Bottle - These skin bottles were not confined to the countries of Asia; the roving tribes, which passed the Hellespont soon after the deluge, and settled in Greece and Italy, probably introduced them into those countries
Winds - Eli Smith, who experienced it effects during the summer, at Beyrout, describes it as possessing the same qualities and characteristics as the Sirocco, which he had felt at Malta, and which also prevails in Sicily and Italy; except that the Sirocco, in passing over the sea, acquires great dampness
Joannes i, Bishop of Rome - Justin's edict had debarred other heretics from public offices, but had excepted the Arian Goths because of his league with Theodoric, the Gothic king of Italy
Columbanus, Abbat of Luxeuil And Bobbio - (by Todd and Reeves, 315), is the entry "Columban, abbat, who was in Italy. " Thus simply does the Irish calendar refer to an Irishman famous in France, Switzerland, and Italy, the great champion of public morals at a cruel and profligate court, the zealous preacher of the Gospel in lands where it had been all but forgotten, and the pious founder of monasteries. Luxeuil was, in short, as Montalembert expresses it, the monastic capital of Gaul, as well as the first school in Christendom, a nursery of bishops and saints; while Bobbio, although for so brief a period under the government of its founder, became a stronghold of orthodoxy against the Arians, and long remained a school of learning for North Italy
Roads And Travel - 3), describing the Via Domitiana, a road which the Emperor Domitian caused to be made between Sinuessa and Puteoli on the west coast of Italy. took in hand the repair of the roads of Italy, In 20 b. he appointed curatores uiarum, who appear to have had a general oversight of the roads of Italy. All milestones in Italy were measured from the miliarium aureum, set up in the Forum at Rome by Augustus. The remaining countries we shall take in order,... (a) In Italy the Via Appia, ‘longarum regina uiarum’ (Slat. A fourth road in Italy was a branch of Via Appia from Capua by Forum Populi and Thurii to Ad Columnam, whence the crossing to Messana (modern Messina) in Sicily was easy. If the name be derived from the town of Gnathia or Egnatia in Apulia (Italy), as is generally believed, then it is clear that from early times it must have been regarded as the overland route from South Italy to the East
Trade And Commerce - At a place like Aquileia, a Knotenpunkt and distributing centre of commerce between the North-East provinces, Italy, the East, and Africa, there was a cosmopolitan population. Settlements of Roman citizens outside Italy (coloniae) might, if the Imperial permission were granted, issue bronze coins, a privilege which apparently was withdrawn about a. It was a silver coin, originally 1/96 of a pound in weight, in reality a Greek drachma, adopted by the Romans for purposes of trade with the Greeks of Southern Italy. There must have been large warehouses at Alexandria and Puteoli in connexion with the great corn traffic between Egypt and Italy, as well as at other ports (cf. Not only did that country supply a third or the corn consumed in Italy; it was also the home of the papyrus plant, so extensively used as writing material. -Silk from China also reached Italy in part through Syria. From the latter district it was brought to Italy by a route which eventually passed through Carnuntum, an important military station (now Petronell, near Vienna) on the upper Danube
Trajan - From 106 to about 112 Trajan was in Italy, and among much beneficial legislation the permanent establishment of the system of alimentationes, inaugurated by Nerva, deserves mention. This was a system for the support of poor boys and girls, including orphans and foundlings, throughout Italy
Galatia - Gallogræci [=‘Greek Gauls’], to distinguish them from their kindred who lived in France and Northern Italy). Part of the same southward tendency appears in their movements in Italy and their conflicts with the Romans in the early centuries of the Republic
Genseric, King of the Vandals - Soon afterwards Boniface, defeated with great loss, returned to Italy. In 455 Genseric, at the invitation of Eudoxia, Valentinian's widow, sailed to Italy, and took Rome without a blow. Spain, Italy, Dalmatia, Campania, Calabria, Apulia, Bruttium, Venetia, Lucania, Epirus, and the Peloponnese all suffered from his ravages
Julianus Eclanensis, Bishop of Eclana - 18), one of which was very generally circulated throughout Italy before it reached the pontiff. 422, Julian apparently left Cilicia and returned to Italy, probably hoping that the new pontiff might reconsider the case of the Pelagians, especially as a variance had then arisen between the Roman see and the African bishops. of Nola in Italy (Phot
Napoleon i - The pope's refusal to annul Jerome Bonaparte's marriage, Napoleon's refusal to act when the French Civil Code was introduced into Italy, extension of Napoleon's domains by the Treaty of Presburg, occupation of the papal state of Ancona, general attitude of Pius not to regard Napoleon's enemies as his, resulted in strained relations between them, and when Pius required Joseph Bonaparte to submit to the Holy See's suzerainty before recognizing him as King of Naples, Napoleon threatened to cease regarding the pope as temporal prince, and to cut his peoples from communication with Rome
Caesarea - Paul sailed thence to Tarsus (Acts 9:30); and arrived there from his second missionary journey (Acts 18:22), also from his third Acts 21:8); and was a prisoner there for two years before his voyage to Italy (Acts 24:27; Acts 25:1; Acts 25:4; Acts 25:6; Acts 25:13)
Illyricum - Though so near to Italy, it was for long comparatively unknown
Evagrius of Antioch - After the schism at Antioch caused by Lucifer's consecration of Paulinus, Evagrius left Antioch, and accompanied Eusebius of Vercelli to Italy in 363 or 364
Gal'Ilee - Here were found all the productions which made Italy rich and beautiful
Vulgate - ] ; while in France, Italy, and Spain the supremacy of the Vulgate lasts to this day. Outside Italy, only Visigothic Spain (Arian, but still Christian, until about 596) and Celtic Ireland were freely open at first to the access of the Scriptures; and in these two countries (cut off, as they subsequently were, from central Christendom by the Moorish invasion of Spain and the English conquest of Britain) the two principal types of text came into being, which, in various combinations with purer texts from Italy, are found in the different MSS which have come down to the present day. Irish missionaries carried the Bible first into southern Scotland, then into Northumbria, then into northern France and up the Rhine into Germany, penetrating even into Switzerland and Italy, and leaving traces of their handiwork in MSS produced in all these countries. Meanwhile Rome was a constant centre of attraction and influence; and to and from Italy there was an unceasing stream of travellers, and not least between Italy and distant Britain. In the production of this scholarship the arrival of Theodore of Tarsus as archbishop of Canterbury in 669 happily co-operated, if it was not a chief stimulus; for Theodore and his companions brought with them from Italy copies of the Latin Bible in a purer text than Ireland had been able to provide. Amiatinus (A) itself, the best single MS of the Latin Bible in existence, was written in Northumbria before 716, and must have been copied from MSS brought from Italy either by Theodore or by Ceolfrid of Jarrow, by whose order it was made
Ireland - About 590 Saint Columbanus with twelve companions went to France, where they established the monastery of Luxeuil, later labored at Bregenz, Switzerland, and finally built the monastery of Bobbio, long the most prominent in northern Italy. Meanwhile Saint Gall was laboring in Switzerland, Saint Fridolin along the Rhine, Saint Fiacre near Meaux, Saint Killan at Würzburg, Saint Livinius in Brabant, Saint Fursey on the Marne, and Saint Cataldus in southern Italy
Melita - Paul was shipwrecked on his voyage to Italy (Acts 28:1) was formerly disputed, but is now universally admitted. Paul’s ship drifted must have been the modern Adriatic, or Gulf of Venice, whereas the term is known to have included in the Apostle’s time the whole expanse of sea between Sicily, Italy, Greece, and Crete (Adria); and (2) that the N
Iconoclastes - ... This edict occasioned a civil war, which broke out in the islands of the Archipelago, and, by the suggestions of the priests and monks, ravaged a part of Asia, and afterwards reached Italy. The civil commotions and insurrections in Italy were chiefly promoted by the Roman pontiffs, Gregory I
Vulgate, the - This has led to the earliest Latin codices being associated with Italy, where, as already observed, there were certainly assemblies in the days of the apostles. This opinion was accepted by Lachmann, Tischendorf, Davidson and Tregelles; but others still refer the translation to Italy
Litany of Loreto - It was first recited by the clergy and people of Loreto, a small place in Italy to which, according to tradition, the angels transported the humble cottage of the Virgin Mary
Loreto, Litany of - It was first recited by the clergy and people of Loreto, a small place in Italy to which, according to tradition, the angels transported the humble cottage of the Virgin Mary
Fortunatus, Bishop of Poictiers - After completing his pilgrimage, he continued to travel in Gaul, because of the disturbed state of Italy, due to the incursions of the Lombards, but finding an additional inducement in the society of Rhadegund of Poictiers, for whom he conceived a Platonic attachment
Anglo-Saxon Church - There was a strong likeness to the ritual of southern Italy, probably due to Adrian, Abbot of Saint Augustine's, who brought the traditions of Monte Cassino to England
Accho - He also considers the style of architecture to be in some degree the original of our ornamented Gothic, before its translation from the holy land to Italy, France, and England
Pheoenix - (Φοίνιξ)... When the lateness of the season made it dangerous for an Alexandrian cornship, which had lain weather-bound for ‘much time’ in Fair Havens, to continue her voyage to Italy, the question of a wintering-place arose (Acts 27:12)
Symmachus, Bishop of Rome - 498, to July, 514, when Theodoric the Ostrogoth was king of Italy and Anastasius emperor in the East
Rome, Romans - After conquering Latium, they were inevitably brought into conflict with the other races of Italy. , they were sovereign over most of Italy. The small landholder disappeared, to join the hungry proletariat in Rome; and Italy became a country of large estates, which, in the words of Pliny, wrought her ruin. ... During the last century of the Republic, Rome and Italy were torn by a long succession of ruinous civil wars
Trade And Commerce - At a place like Aquileia, a Knotenpunkt and distributing centre of commerce between the North-East provinces, Italy, the East, and Africa, there was a cosmopolitan population. Settlements of Roman citizens outside Italy (coloniae) might, if the Imperial permission were granted, issue bronze coins, a privilege which apparently was withdrawn about a. It was a silver coin, originally 1/96 of a pound in weight, in reality a Greek drachma, adopted by the Romans for purposes of trade with the Greeks of Southern Italy. There must have been large warehouses at Alexandria and Puteoli in connexion with the great corn traffic between Egypt and Italy, as well as at other ports (cf. Not only did that country supply a third or the corn consumed in Italy; it was also the home of the papyrus plant, so extensively used as writing material
Vespasian - Italy (29th October). Antonius Primus, commander of the seventh legion, had been ordered to remain at Aquileia, but of his own accord he marched into Italy. Many pieces of public land in Rome, Italy, and the provinces which had been illegally taken possession of by private persons were taken back by the State. In the same year important work was done on roads in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere. After the folly and waste of the Neronian period, such a rule as his was at once a necessity and a blessing to Italy
Timothy - Paul was then still in Italy (Hebrews 13:24) waiting for Timothy to join him so as to start for Jerusalem. They were together at Ephesus, after his departing eastward from Italy (1 Timothy 1:3)
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Augustan Band - During his voyage from Caesarea to Italy, St
Immaculate Conception - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - ... Name Meaning stainless (immaculata) (Latin) ... Patronage Agra, India, archdiocese of... Albany, New York, diocese of... Argentina... Austin, Texas, diocese of... Baltimore, Maryland, archdiocese of... barrel makers... Bismarck, North Dakota, diocese of... Brazil... Brooklyn, New York, diocese of... Burlington, Vermont, diocese of... Calgary, Alberta, Canada... Camden, New Jersey, diocese of... Cerva, Catanzaro, Italy... Chicago, Illinois, archdiocese of... cloth makers... cloth workers... Congo... coopers... Corsica, France... Crookston, Minnesota, diocese of... Denver, Colorado, archdiocese of... Dhaka, Bangladesh, archdiocese of... Elphin, Ireland, diocese of... Equatorial Guinea... Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana, diocese of... Galveston-Houston>, Texas, archdiocese of... Guam... Is-Swieqi, Malta... Johannesburg, South Africa, diocese of... Kansas City, Kansas, archdiocese of... Kansas City - Saint Joseph, Missouri, diocese of... Keimoes-Upington, South Africa, diocese of... Lafayette, Louisiana, diocese of... Malolos, Philippines, diocese of... military ordinariate of the Philippines... Mobile, Alabama, archdiocese of... Nicaragua... Nueva Segovia, Philippines... Ogdensburg, New York, diocese of... Ozamiz, Philippines, archdiocese of... Panama... Pasig, Philippines... Peoria, Illinois, diocese of... Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, archdiocese of... Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, diocese of... Pondicherry and Cuddalore, India... Portland, Maine, diocese of... Portland, Oregon, archdiocese of... Portugal... Pueblo, Colorado, diocese of... Rockford, Illinois, diocese of... Seattle, Washington, archdiocese of... Shreveport, Louisiana, diocese of... soldiers of the United States... Southwark, England, archdiocese of... Spanish infantry... Spokane, Washington, diocese of... Springfield, Illinois, diocese of... Swieqi, Malta... Syracuse, New York, diocese of... Tanzania... tapestry workers... Toa Alto, Puerto Rico... Torrevieja, Spain... Tunisia... Tyler, Texas, diocese of... United States... upholsterers... Virac, Philippines... Wichita, Kansas, diocese of... Additional Information Goffine's Devout Instructions... Ad Diem Illum Laetissiumum: On the Immaculate Conception, by Pope Saint Pius X... Fulgens Corona: Proclaiming a Marian year to Commemorate the Centenary of the Definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception, Venerable Pope Pius XII... Ineffabilis Deus: The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Ubi Primum: On The Immaculate Conception, by Blessed Pope Pius IX... Translate español | français | deutsch | italiano | português ...
Epiphanius, Patriarch of Constantinople - 497, 507, 523) The severe measures by which Justin was establishing the supremacy of the Catholics in the East were arousing Theodoric, the Arian master of Italy, to retaliation in the West
Pelagius i., Bishop of Rome - He also employed Pelagius, together with a layman Theodorus, in an embassy to Constantinople for concluding peace with the emperor, binding them with an oath to do their best in his behalf and to return without delay to Italy
Prison (2) - 22 (Baedeker, Italy, ii
Valerianus, Emperor - A German host entered Italy itself, and penetrated to Ravenna
Paul - 64 (?), from Italy
Jesuits - ... While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other cities
Jesus, Company of - ... While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other cities
Jesus, Society of - ... While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other cities
Dionysius (19), Monk in Western Church - It was adopted in Italy soon after its publication; in France perhaps a century later
Society of Jesus - ... While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other cities
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - The cave, the well-known "il Sagro Speco," is shewn about three miles of very steep ascent above the town of Subiaco, and the traditionary spot marked by a monastery, once famous for its library and for the first printing press in Italy, where the youthful anchoret rolled naked in the thorn-bushes to overcome sensual temptations (Mab. 22), but beyond the borders of Italy to Sicily (Mab
Augustus - Though only eighteen and a half years of age, he, having been adopted into the Julian family by the will of his grand-uncle, whose heir he was at the same time constituted, took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, and immediately left for Italy, to claim not only the private but also the public inheritance of his grand-uncle. -The Emperor’s administration covered not only the whole of Italy, but the imperial (or frontier) provinces, where an army was required
Domitian - It was unfortunate for his future career that his father and elder brother were absent for a lengthy period from Rome and Italy, being detained by the Jewish War. Domitian in consequence ordered that no new vineyards should be laid out in Italy and that the vines of the provinces should be reduced to one half their former number
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - In Gaul the church was oppressed under its barbarian rulers; in Italy, under the Arian Lombards, the clergy were infected with the demoralization of the day. Since the recovery of Italy by Justinian (after the capture of Rome by Belisarius in 536) the popes had been far less independent than even under the Gothic kings. ] 6) over the suburban provinces under the civil jurisdiction of the vicarius urbis, including Upper Italy, Sicily, Sardinia, and Corsica. But being the only patriarch in the West, he had in fact claimed and exercised jurisdiction beyond these original limits, including the three other vicariates into which the prefecture of Italy was politically divided: N. Italy, with its centre at Milan, W. Peter, in Italy, Sardinia, and Corsica, and also in more remote parts, e
Hosius (1), a Confessor Under Maximian - On the abdication of Diocletian and Maximian in 305, Gaul, with Italy and Africa, was given to Constantius, and the rest of the empire to Galerius. But Constantius, content with the dignity of Augustus, refused to administer Italy and Africa (Eutropius, x. 6), was not willing that Christianity should be accounted unlawful in the countries beyond the confines of Italy, i. It is very probable that between 286 and 292, while Maximian was sole ruler of the West, there were many martyrdoms in Spain as well as in Gaul and Italy. Bishops from Italy, Gaul, Spain, and Britain were assembled as representatives of the whole Western church. of Rome held the first place among all his brethren, partly because Rome was the principal city in the world, yet his ecclesiastical jurisdiction does not appear to have extended beyond the churches of the ten provinces of Italy, called in the versio prisca of the 6th Nicene canon "suburbicaria loca
Hebrews, Epistle to - On the other hand, the only direct internal evidence pointing to the readers’ relations with Rome is found in the salutation, ‘They of Italy salute you’ ( Hebrews 13:24 ). It is true that this is sufficient to establish a connexion; but it would be futile to deny that it is capable of a double explanation that the Epistle was written either from or to Italy. Indeed, on the supposition that ‘they of Italy’ were the writer’s companions who were absent with him from Rome, the words do not seem the most felicitous method of expressing their regards
Rome - After conquering Latium they were inevitably brought into conflict with the other races of Italy, over most of which they were sovereign about the middle of the 3rd cent
Eusebius, Bishop of Vercellae - Thence he passed into Illyria, and so to Italy, which, in the words of Jerome, "put off its mourning on Eusebius's return
Deluge - Italy, France, Switzerland, Germany, England, &c
Eudoxius, Bishop of Constantinople - " Athanasius says that Eudoxius was sent with Martyrius and Macedonius to take the new creed of Antioch to Italy
Nerva - Considerable improvement and development of roads and aqueducts both in Italy and in the provinces are also associated with this principate
Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata - The Eastern bishops look to their brethren in Italy and Gaul for sympathy and advice, paying a tribute to the pristine purity which the Western churches had preserved intact while the Eastern churches had been lacerated, undermined, and divided by heretics and unconstitutional acts. An encyclical which Eusebius proposed to send to Italy was not prepared, but Dorotheus and Gregory of Nyssa were induced to visit Rome in 374
New Testament - , 2:15) was a particular recension current in upper Italy. From their agreement with the citations of African fathers, Tertullian and Cyprian, Wiseman infers the archetypal text originated in northern Africa, from whence it passed to Italy (second century) when Irenaeus' translator knew it. a particular revision of the old Latin version current in upper Italy) is to be preferred to the rest. brought from Africa to Italy, and there emended from Greek manuscripts also improved in Latinity), and "nonemended copies," i. ... (2) The same version revised in upper Italy appears with a Byzantine tendency in Codex Brixianus, f
Hilarius (7) Pictaviensis, Saint - Italy and Illyria, to bring these provinces into spiritual conformity with Gaul. He arrived in Italy a. ... Hilary, nevertheless, remained in Italy until the late autumn of 364. ... Hilary spent more than three years at Poictiers after his return from Italy. No leave was asked when he descended into Italy to confront Auxentius
Army - ... The "Italian band" or cohort consisted of volunteers from Italy, perhaps the procurator's body guard
Slave/Servant - In the first Christian century, one out of three persons in Italy and one out of five elsewhere was a slave
Germanus, Saint, Bishop of Auxerre - German set forth at once for Italy, and on June 19, 448 reached Milan; proceeding to Ravenna, he obtained pardon for the Armoricans, but unfortunately news came that they had again revolted, and his mission proved in vain
Antichrist - The rise of Antichrist was to be preceded by the dissolution of the Roman empire, the establishment of a different form of government in Italy, and the division of the empire into ten kingdoms; all these events taking place, make it very probable that the year 606 was the time of his rise
Maronites - It is certain that there are Maronites in Syria who still behold the church of Rome with the greatest aversion and abhorrence; nay, what is still more remarkable, great numbers of that nation residing in Italy, even under the eye of the pontiff, opposed his authority during the last century, and threw the court of Rome into great perplexity
Rome - Garibaldi invaded the Papal States in 1867, although it was not until 1870 that Rome was taken from the popes and made the capital of the Kingdom of Italy
Lycia - From these ports ships sailed east to Phoenicia, south to Egypt and west to Greece and Italy
Oracle - Apollo had the greatest number: such as those of Claros, of the Branchidae, of the suburbs of Daphne at Antioch, of Delos, of Argos, of Troas, AEolis, &c, of Baiae in Italy, and others in Cilicia, in Egypt, in the Alps, in Thrace, at Corinth, in Arcadia, in Laconia, and in many other places enumerated by Van Dale. Saturn had oracles in several places, but the most famous were those of Cumae in Italy, and of Alexandria in Egypt. Geryon, the three-headed monster slain by Hercules, had an oracle in Italy near Padua, consulted by Tiberius; that of Hercules was at Tivoli, and was given by lots, like those of Praeneste and Antium. The demi-gods and heroes had likewise their oracles, such were those of Castor and Pollux at Lacedaemon, of Amphiaraus, of Mopsus in Cilicia, of Ulysses, Amphilochus, Sarpedon in Troas, Hermione in Macedonia, Pasiphae in Laconia, Chalcas in Italy, Aristaeus in Boeotia, Autolycus at Sinope, Phryxus among the Colchi, Zamolxis among the Getae, Hephaestion the minion of Alexander, and Antinous, &c
Alexandria - ... ‘The corn which was sent from thence to Italy was conveyed in ships of very great size. ... The cruisers and coasters of Alexandria traded with every part of the Mediterranean, and it was an ordinary occurrence to find vessels bound for Italy in the harbours of Myra and Malta (Acts 27:6; Acts 28:11)
Atheist - These principles, with the other improvements of Greece, were transferred to Rome; and, excepting in Italy, we hear little of Atheism, for many ages after the Christian aera. "For some ages before the Reformation," says Archbishop Tillotson, "Atheism was confined to Italy, and had its chief residence at Rome
Greece - As a result, colonies were established on the Mediterranean islands, Asia Minor, Sicily, Italy, and in the Black Sea area
Corinth - Paul, who resided here eighteen months, between the years 51 and 53; during which time he enjoyed the friendship of Aquila and his wife Priscilla, two Jewish Christians, who had been expelled from Italy, with other Jews, by an edict of Claudius
Baal - It is probable that Baal, Belus, or Bel, the great god of the Carthaginians, and also of the Sidonians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, who, from the testimony of Scripture, appears to have been delighted with human sacrifices, was the Moloch of the Ammonites; the Chronus of the Greeks, who was the chief object of adoration in Italy, Crete, Cyprus, and Rhodes, and all other countries where divine honours were paid him; and the Saturn of the Latins
Lamaism - The whole country, like Italy, abounds with priests; and they entirely subsist on the rich presents sent them from the utmost extent of Tartary, from the empire of the great mogul, and from almost all parts of the Indies
Fox - The reason, indeed, assigned by Ovid, is too frivolous an origin for so solemn a rite; and the time of its celebration, the seventeenth of April, it seems, was not harvest time, when the fields were covered with corn, vestilos messibus agros; for the middle of April was seed time in Italy, as appears from Virgil's Georgics
Ambrosius of Milan - He practised at the court of the praetorian prefect of Italy, Probus, who appointed him "consular" magistrate of the provinces of Liguria and Aemilia. 383), and had been stained by the violent death of Gratian, Justina in her alarm had recourse to the great Catholic bishop, and persuaded him to go on an embassy to Maximus, to beg him to leave Italy untouched. It was evident that Maximus was preparing to invade Italy; and as Ambrose had apparently been successful in his former embassy, he was charged with another conciliatory appeal to the same ruler. He was in Gaul at the time of his death, and Ambrose was at that moment crossing the Alps to visit him there, partly by the desire of the Italian magistrates, who wished Valentinian to return to Italy, and partly at the request of the emperor himself, who was anxious to be baptized by him. It became known that his strength was failing, and the count Stilicho, saying that the death of such a man threatened death to Italy itself, induced a number of the chief men of the city to go to him, and entreat him to pray to God that his life might be spared
Leo i, the Great - , the Eastern emperor, in the interest of Leo's petition for a council in Italy, all which letters reiterate the views of Leo and assert the loftiest position for the see of Rome (Leo Mag. Again, after the disastrous termination of the Ephesine synod, Leo cannot obtain from the emperor his request for a gathering in Italy. ) and a circular letter to the bishops of Italy ( Ep. ), there are two to the emperor, urgently requesting that a more oecumenical council may be held in Italy. We hear nothing of Leo's requirement that it should be in Italy, though he did not cease to wish that it should be there ( Ep
Division of the Earth - These, spreading from the regions north of Armenia and Bactriana, Ezekiel 38:6 , extended themselves westward over nearly the whole continent of Europe; still retaining their paternal denomination, with some slight variation, as Cimmerians, in Asia; Cimbri and Umbri, in Gaul and Italy; and Cymri, Cambri, and Cumbri, in Wales and Cumberland at the present day. They are also identified by ancient authors with the Galatae of Asia Minor, the Gaels, Gauls, and Celtae, of Europe, who likewise spread from the Euxine Sea, to the Western Ocean; and from the Baltic to Italy southward, and first planted the British Isles. Of Javan's sons, Elishah and Dodon, may be recognized in Elis and Dodona, the oldest settlements of Greece; Kittim, in the Citium of Macedonia, and Chittim, or maritime coasts of Greece and Italy, ... Numbers 24:24 ; and Tarshish, in the Tarsus of Cilicia, and Tartessus of Spain
Greece - As the west coast of the homeland was mountainous and harbourless, while the east was full of gulfs, bays, and havens, Greece turned her back on Italy and her face to the aegean and Asia Minor, so much so that in the 6th and the beginning of the 5th centuries b. Symonds, Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, do, 1898; L
Diocletian, Emperor - Maximian had those of Africa and Italy. In Syria, Palestine, Egypt, Western Africa, Italy, and Spain the passions of men were let loose, and raged without restraint
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - Martin's infancy was passed at Pavia in Italy, where his father was for some time stationed, and there he received his education, apparently a pagan one. Gaul being in a state of confusion in consequence of the exile of Hilary, Martin went to Italy, and for a short time found a safe retreat at Milan
Babylon, Mystical - Already this is taking place in Spain, Italy, Austria, and France (Revelation 17:16)
Excommunication - In former ages, these papal fulminations were most terrible things; but latterly they were formidable to none but a few petty states of Italy
Melita - " After the frustrated attempt of the shipmen to flee in a boat, they lightened the ship of its wheat (brought from Egypt, the great granary of Italy, Acts 27:6); they knew not the land (for Paul's bay is remote from the great harbor, and has no marked features to enable the Alexandrian seamen to know it), but discovered "a creek having a sandy beach (aigialon ) into which they determined if possible to strand the ship
Tim'Othy - leads to the conclusion that he did not share in the perilous voyage to Italy
Deists - The name of deists seems to have been first assumed, as the denomination of a party, about the middle of the 16th century, by some gentlemen in France and Italy, who were desirous of thus disguising their opposition to Christianity by a more honourable appellation than that of atheists
Church, Gallican - The bishoprics and prebends were entirely in the gift of the king; and no other Catholic state, except Italy, had so numerous a clergy as France
Felix Iii, Bishop of Rome - Peter's church to elect a successor to Simplicius, Basilius (Praefectus Praetorio and Patrician) interposed in the name of his master Odoacer the Herulian, who since 476 had ruled the West as king of Italy, alleging, as a fact known to his hearers, that Simplicius before his death had conjured the king to allow no election of a successor without his consent; and this to avoid the turmoil and detriment to the church that was likely to ensue
Lama, Grand - The whole country, like Italy, abounds with priests; and they entirely subsist on the great number of rich presents which are sent them from the utmost extent of Tartary, from the empire of the Great Mogul, and from almost all parts of the Indies
Acacius (7), Patriarch of Constantinople - Vitalis and Misenus were induced to communicate publicly with Acacius and the representatives of Mongus, and returned dishonoured to Italy (484)
Thorn - Perhaps it is the rhamnus paliurus, a deciduous plant or tree, a native of Palestine, Spain, and Italy
Chaldean Philosophy - Among the Romans these impostors were so troublesome, that, during the time of the republic, it became necessary to issue an edict requiring the Chaldeans, or mathematicians, (by which latter appellation they were commonly known,) to depart from Rome and Italy within ten days; and, afterward, under the emperors, these soothsayers were put under the most severe interdiction
Pilate - It is not known of what country or family Pontius Pilate was, but it is believed that he was of Rome, or, at least, of Italy
Silvester, Bishop of Rome - Moved by gratitude, he made over to the pope and his successors the temporal dominion of Rome, of the greatest part of Italy, and of other provinces, thinking it unfit that the place where the monarch of the whole church and the vicar of Christ resided should be subject to earthly sway
Hebrews, Letter to the - They may have lived in Italy (perhaps Rome), for a group of Italians who were away from home at the time join the writer in sending greetings to them (Hebrews 13:24)
Emperor-Worship - The establishment of his power meant the restoration of tranquillity and security to Italy after a reign of terror. A new era seemed begun in Italy no less than in the East. It was because of this special need of the Eastern provinces that Augustus accepted deification from them, while ostensibly refusing it from Italy
Luke, the Gospel According to - ... Luke's describing minutely, in Paul's journey, the places before reaching Sicily and Italy, but omitting such description of Syracuse, Rhegium, Puteoli, Appii Forum, and the Three Taverns, as if familiar to his reader, implies Theophilus was well acquainted with Sicily and Italy
Rome And the Roman Empire - International rule the government in Rome, Italy, exercised after 27 B. ... The aristocratic Julio-Claudian dynasties that had reigned until the death of Nero were happily replaced by the Flavian dynasty, which issued from the rural middle class of Italy and reflected a more modest and responsible approach to the use of power
Boethius, Anicus Manlius Severinus - ) downwards, that Boëthius laid down his life in his zeal for the Catholic faith against the Arian invaders of Italy, this is not his own account of his fall from court favour nor is it supported by any contemporary writer. 470-475, as is inferred from his contemporary Ennodius (Eucharisma de Vitâ suâ ), who says that he himself was sixteen when Theodoric invaded Italy, a
Vigilius, Bishop of Rome - Justinian acted on his advice; but though the obsequious Easterns obeyed the summons, very few of the Westerns came—a small number from Italy, two from Illyricum, but none from Africa. ... Justinian, having thus attained his end, Vigilius was allowed to leave Constantinople for Rome, after a compelled absence of 7 years, the emperor giving him certain grants, privileges, and exemptions for the people of Rome and Italy (Baron
Version - That made in Italy, and called the Itala, was reckoned the most accurate
Monk - ... From the East this gloomy disposition passed into the West, and first into Italy and its neighbouring islands; though it is uncertain who transplanted it thither
Hilarius, Bishop of Rome - After the council, Flavian having died from the violent treatment he had undergone, Hilarius, fearing with reason the like usage, escaped from Ephesus and travelled by by-roads to Italy
Maronites - It is also certain that there are Maronites in Syria, who still behold the church of Rome with the greatest aversion and abhorrence; nay, what is still more remarkable, great numbers of that nation residing in Italy, even under the eye of the pontiff, opposed his authority during the seventeenth century, and threw the court of Rome into great perplexity
Monk - From the east this gloomy institution passed into the west, and first into Italy and its neighbouring islands, though it is uncertain who transplanted it thither
Messiah - It was not long before he was found out to be an impostor, and was obliged to flee from Italy to Poland to save his life: what became of him afterward does not seem to be recorded
Waldenses - WALLENSES, or ALBIGENSES, the Vaudois, or inhabitants of the beautiful valleys of the Alps, between Italy and Provence
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - The best authenticated account makes him a native of Rome who studied philosophy in Italy, became an antistes ( i
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - Italy. ... The friends returned to Italy. ) of Antioch, who during his stay in Italy had played a considerable part in church affairs (Ep. He wrote letters to his friends in Italy, to Florentius at Jerusalem (v
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - " Their power throughout the churches of Egypt, Libya, and Pentapolis was, by ancient custom, which the Nicene council afterwards confirmed, almost monarchical, extending over about a hundred bishops, who revered their judgments as the decisions of the see of Rome were revered in Italy. , who in the partition of the empire had a certain precedency over his brothers Constantius and Constans, the sovereigns of the East and of Italy, wrote from Trèves to the Catholics of Alexandria, announcing that he had resolved, in fulfilment of an intention of his father, to send back Athanasius, of whose character he expressed high admiration (Apol. had been slain during his invasion of Italy. On arriving at the great capital of Northern Italy, which was to be so memorably associated with the struggle between the church and Arianism, he was admitted, with Protasius, bp
Novatianus And Novatianism - He made a journey into distant parts of Italy and brought back 3 bishops who consecrated Novatian. 2, with Gothofred's comment), giving them a certain restricted liberty, was directed to Bassus, probably vicarius of Italy. Italy, and Spain the sect seems to have taken as firm root as in Phrygia and central Asia Minor
Croisade, or Crusade - But though Italy seemed to have embraced the design with ardour, Martin thought it necessary, in order to obtain perfect success, to engage the greater and more warlike nations in the same enterprise. king of England, arrived at Palestine, at the head of the English croisade; but finding it most advantageous to conclude a peace, he reembarked, and steered towards Italy
Jews - In Italy they flourished for many centuries; while in France they were alternately protected and persecuted
Minister - The sharp shrill cry of 'Acqua! Acqua!' constantly pierces the ear of the wanderer in Venice and other towns of sultry Italy
Census - ’ Not only was Rome itself included, with all the provinces, whether in Italy or elsewhere, but also those lands which, though having kings of their own, were really under the Roman suzerainty
Caesarius, Bishop of Arles - Caesarius was liberal in the loan of sermons, and sent suggestions for discourses to priests and even bishops living in Spain, Italy, Gaul, and France (i
Decius, Emperor - The army elected him as emperor, and forced him to lead them into Italy
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - Peter suffered martyrdom in Italy at the same time as St
Ark - As many cities, not in Egypt only and Boeotia, but in Cilicia, Ionia, Attica, Phthiotis, Cataonia, Syria, and Italy, were called Theba; so likewise the city Apamea was denominated Cibotus, from κιβωτος , in memory of the ark, and of the history connected with it
Galilee - In picturesque beauty, it comes nearest to the lake of Locarno, in Italy, although it is destitute of any thing similar to the islands by which that majestic piece of water is adorned
Greece, Religion And Society of - The name “Greek” was given by the local inhabitants to a group of colonists who settled on the western coast of Italy. During this era the Greeks established trade colonies on the shores of the Black Sea, the region of the Dardanelles, on the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea, the islands of Crete, Rhodes, Cyprus, Sidon and Tyre, Naucratis in the Nile delta, Italy, Sicily, and Spain
Gratianus, Emperor - Justina fixed her court at Sirmium; and the Western empire was perhaps nominally divided between the two brothers, Gratian having Gaul, Spain, and Britain, and Valentinian, Italy, Illyricum, and Africa (Zos. ... These laws were followed by a famine in Italy, especially in Rome, which the pagans naturally ascribed to sacrilege (Symm
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - The writer of Hebrews 13:23-24, doubtless Paul, was at liberty and in Italy; liberated from his first imprisonment at Rome, Paul must have resumed his apostolic journeyings, then was imprisoned at Rome again; thence just before his death he wrote 2 Timothy (See PAUL
Mark (John) - Italy, and from this springs Mark’s association with Venice (notably the Church of St
Aquila And Priscilla - ... Aquila and Priscilla came from Italy to Corinth, ‘because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to depart from Rome’ (Acts 18:2)
Petrus ii., Archbaptist of Alexandria - 133); and who, in conjunction with another presbyter, when they were passing through Italy to Egypt in 347, had accepted from the notorious Arian intriguers Valens and Ursacius a written attestation of their desire to be at peace with Athanasius, when his cause was for the time triumphant (Athan
Simplicius, Bishop of Rome - 476) of Odoacer as king of Italy
Mss - Paul himself, it might seem reasonable to suppose that Latin versions of the Christian literature would have been required almost as soon as it came into being, But this would be to overlook the bilingual character of the Roman Empire, even in Italy. Ceolfrid died on the way, but his companions completed the gift, and in Italy the MS has since remained; for some time it was at Monte Amiata, whence its name. Its text was probably derived from one or more MSS brought to England from Italy; and it is generally regarded as the best extant MS of the Vulgate
Acts of the Apostles - we have Origen and Didymus, representing the Alexandrian school; Cyprian for Africa, and Novatian for Italy. Athanasius and Cyril represent the later development of the Alexandria text; Lucifer, Jerome, and Ambrosiaster represent the text of Rome and Italy; Augustine, that of Africa; Eusebius and Cyril of Jerusalem the Palestinian text, which according to von Soden is I; the later Church writers mostly use the K text, though they sometimes show traces of probably local contamination with H and I
Claudius - In 52 astrologers were banished from Italy
Luke (2) - ] The name Lucanus suggests ‘Lucanian,’ a native of the district of Southern Italy; it also suggests the Latin poet, a member of the gens Annaea, nephew of Seneca the philosopher
Augustinus, Archbaptist of Canterbury - 596 they set out, traversed the north of Italy, and reached the neighbourhood of Aix, in Provence, and the north of France
Providence - , establishing a regular police everywhere, and the universal peace which prevailed at the coming of the gospel of peace; the multiplication and settling of Jews in Egypt, Asia, Greece, Italy, and western Europe (Horace, Sat
Idatius (3), Author of Well-Known Chronicle - branches off from the Fasti Idatiani , a copy of the Constantinople Fasti came westward, received certain additions in Italy and then reached Spain, where a Spanish reviser and continuator gave them the shape under which we now know them as the Fasti Idatiani
Ships, Sailors, And Navigation - Ultimately, however, the sailing ship with a rounded hull and a single square sail became the primary cargo ship from Phoenicia to Italy. However, prevailing wind direction produced a definite pattern with ships traveling in most southerly directions, from Italy or Greece to Asia Minor, Syria, Egypt, and Africa, anticipating a quick and easy voyage with the aid of northerly winds
Sibylline Oracles - Whatever measures it dictated-fasts, feasts, expiations, or the like-were carried out with trembling, anxious care, as during the panic roused by Hannibal’s campaign in Northern Italy. 270, when the Alemanni invaded Italy, the Senate hesitated to consult the Sibyllina, and Aurelian had to incite them (Vopiscus, Vita Aureliani, 20); the Emperor taunted them with behaving as if they were in a Christian church-a significant indication of the changed attitude towards these oracles! Their use lingered down to the age of Julian
Jesuits - They were persecuted without discrimination, robbed of their property without pity, and embarked for Italy without previous preparation; so that, no provision having been made for their reception, they were literally left to perish with hunger in their vessels. Three days afterward, the same measures were adopted with regard to every other college of the order in the kingdom; and, ships having been provided at the different seaports, they were all embarked for the ecclesiastical states in Italy
Euphemius, Patriarch of Constantinople - Theodoric had become master of Italy, and in 493 sent Faustus and Irenaeus to the emperor Anastasius to ask to peace
Euric, King of Toulouse - Glycerius, fearful for Italy, and hoping to purchase a renewal of the foedus, had in 473 formally ceded the country to Euric, a compact rejected by Ecdicius and Sidonius; and now Nepos, for the same reasons, sent legates to Euric, amongst them the famous Epiphanius of Pavia (Ennod
Lactantius - Augustine each employing Latin with the freedom of a vernacular and in the case of Lactantius with so much purity as to have procured for him the title of the Christian Cicero; while Italy produced no Christian apologists and till St
Hippolytus Romanus - unquestionably the most learned member of the Roman church, and a man of very considerable literary activity; his works were very numerous, and their circulation spread from Italy to the East, some having been translated into Syriac, Arabic, Armenian, Ethiopic, and perhaps other languages. His name assumes various disguises, as Poltus in the popular memory of Italy, in Egypt as Abulides. It has been disputed whether Hippolytus was a presbyter or a bishop; and if a bishop, of what see; whether he laboured in Italy or Arabia; whether he was orthodox or a schismatic; whether he was a martyr, and if so, by what death he died
Clovis, King of Salian Franks - Theodoric, the Ostrogothic king of Italy, was an Arian, though a tolerant one, but Euric, the Visigoth, had proclaimed himself militant and proselytizing (Fauriel, ii
Joannes ii, Bishop of Jerusalem - Imbued with that tendency of Eastern church teachers which formed their chief difference from those of the Western church, he with difficulty brought himself to acquiesce in the condemnation of Origenism or to take any steps against Pelagius, with whom he was brought in contact at the close of his episcopacy, and the presence of Jerome and other immigrants from Italy, and the anti-Origenistic vehemence of Epiphanius of Salamis and Theophilus of Alexandria, made it impossible for him to escape the reproach of laxity and even at times of heresy
Pilgrimage - They came out of Italy into Germany bare- footed, and bare-headed, feeding all the week, except on Sundays, upon herbs and roots sprinkled with salt
Asia Minor, Cities of - The large port facility provided ample anchorage for ships carrying goods east from Greece and Italy, as well as for those which took to Rome the wares brought overland from Asia and the Far East
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - 120) at Samosata on the Euphrates, the son of poor parents, he gradually betook himself to the composing and reciting of rhetorical exercises, which he did with continually increasing success as he journeyed westwards, visiting Greece, Italy, and Gaul, where his success reached the highest pitch
Hebrews - "They of Italy salute you," is the only expression in the epistle which can assist us in determining from whence it was written. The Greek words are, οι απο της ‘Ιταλιας , which should have been translated, "Those from Italy salute you;" and the only inference to be drawn from them seems to be, that St
Manuscripts - It was probably written in Italy, or South France, where it was when Beza acquired it and gave it to the University of Cambridge in 1581. Italy
Arius, Followers of - The second period was that between the councils of Sardica and Ariminum (Rimini, in Italy) in 359, during which opinion was gradually settling down into three distinct forms, which may be roughly described as the orthodox, the semi-Arian, and the Arian view. The calling of a new council in the same year at Rimini (Ariminum) in Italy brought these new tendencies very plainly to light
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - Peter, the prince of the apostles, and which that church ever preserved—especially as no churches had been founded in Italy, Gaul, Spain, Africa, Sicily, or the interjacent islands, except by St. —There were three Gothic invasions of Italy—the first under Alaric, the second under Radagaisus, the third led by Alaric himself, who laid siege to Rome a
Julius (5), Bishop of Rome - ), to inform the bishops of Italy, Sardinia, and Sicily of what had been done, that they might know with whom to hold communion. They include, from various parts of the West with a few from the East 78, from Gaul and Britain 34, from Africa 36, from Egypt 94, from Italy 15, from Cyprus 12, from Palestine 15
Tiberius - He made successful appearances in the law-courts in his early youth, and was given two commissions, one connected with the corn supply and the other with the inspection of the barracoons of Italy
Popery - ; Moore's View of Society and Manners in Italy; Dr
Heracleon, a Gnostic - Italy; or "Praedestinatus" may be right in making Sicily the scene of his inventions about Heracleon
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - 360) refers to the synod of Rimini, and the opinion expressed by various bishops from different parts of Italy, and from Spain and Africa
Monnica - ... She sorely bewailed Augustine's resolve to migrate to Italy, and would not leave his side; and when he escaped her, affecting to bid a friend good-bye on board ship and persuading her to spend the night in a chapel dedicated to Cyprian, she would not give him up
Messiah - Upon the fame of these things the Jews of Italy sent legates to Smyrna, to enquire into the truth of these matters. It was not long before he was found out to be an impostor, and was obliged to fly from Italy to Poland to save his life
Paul - After a while arrangements were made to carry "Paul and certain other prisoners," in the custody of a centurion named Julius, into Italy; and amongst the company, whether by favor or from any other reason, we find the historian of the Acts, who in chapters 27,28 gives a graphic description of the voyage to Rome and the shipwreck on the Island of Melita or Malta. After a three-months stay in Malta the soldiers and their prisoners left in an Alexandria ship for Italy
Tongues, Confusion of - Once they occupied Gaul, northern Italy, large Darts of Spain, Germany, Switzerland
Hebrews, the Epistle to the - ) The salutation which he transmits from believers in Italy implies that Rome was the place of writing (Hebrews 13:24)
Ananias And Sapphira - All Scotland, all Ireland, and many parts even of rich England; France, Switzerland, Italy; churches, manses, missions-everything comes on Edinburgh, and on a limited field of Edinburgh
Text of the New Testament - Its place of origin has been variously supposed to besouthern France, southern or western Italy, or Sardinia, but the evidence is not decisive in favour of any of these. It may probably have been written in Italy
Reformation - was in Italy, to whom the dissenting princes sent ambassadors to lay their grievances before him; but they met with no encouraging reception from him. ... On the other hand, the Protestants were firmly persuaded, that, as the council was assembled in Italy, and by the authority of the pope alone, the latter must have had an undue influence in that assembly; of consequence that all things must have been carried by the votaries of Rome
Rome - In a double colonnade connected with it were statues of each of the fifty fabled daughters of Danaus, and there also were the Imperial libraries of Greek and Roman literature, one of the earliest public libraries in Italy, splendidly equipped by Augustus not only with manuscript books but also with busts of the great authors. -In modern times the Capitoline Hill is disfigured on the southern side by a hideous barrack-like erection with a campanile, called the Campidoglio, and on the other peak, the Arx, there is being erected an enormous monument to commemorate united Italy
Art - This does not mean, as Westcott supposes, that the Church of Italy was artistic while the rest of the Church was not; still less does it show, as is popularly imagined, that the Roman Christians used the Catacombs as their churches and permanent hiding-places. The churches destroyed by Diocletian were rebuilt under Constantine, and it is to the Constantinian period that the earliest surviving basilicas belong, whether in Italy, Syria, or Africa
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Italy near the court, being removed from place to place (Jul. Italy, receiving its submission
Ships And Boats - Paul sailed were ships of Alexandria engaged in the wheat trade with Italy (Acts 27:6 ; Acts 27:38 , Acts 28:11 ; Acts 28:13 ; Puteoli was the great emporium of wheat), is especially interesting, as we happen to know more about them than any other ancient class of ship
Commission - But, as opposition had now become more pronounced, greater emphasis is laid on it; and the brethren, like carabinieri patrols in modern Italy, travelled two and two
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - 6, 523, Anastasius and Justin being successively emperors of the East and Theodoric ruling the West as king of Italy
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - ... Celestine was zealous against Pelagianism, and constrained Coelestius, the companion of Pelagius, to leave Italy
Roman Catholics - The pope's authority in other kingdoms, is merely spiritual, but in Italy he is a temporal sovereign, Louis XVIII and the allies having, in 1814, restored him to his throne, and to those temporalities of which he was deprived by Buonaparte and the French revolution
Beda, Historian - ; his visits to Italy and burial at Genoa or at Rome, which seem to belong to another person of the same name, ( ib
Nehemiah - And Nehemiah forgot all about Artaxerxes' supper as he talked with the travellers, till he said to them as he bade them farewell, 'If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning; if I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy!' Young John Milton, you will remember, could not enjoy the skies, or the art, or the letters of Italy, while England at home was as she was
Pilate - He was a Roman citizen, and was born probably in Italy
Family - Luke, who (as the pronoun ‘we’ shows) accompanied him on his voyage to Italy, as also did Aristarchus (Acts 27:2; Colossians 4:10), must have done so in the capacity of a slave, taking this office on himself in order to follow his master
Persecution - This law appears, upon a first view, designed merely to impede the farther progress of Christianity; but it incited the magistracy to enforce the laws of former emperors, which were still existing, against the Christians; and during seven years they were exposed to a rigorous persecution in Palestine, Egypt, the rest of Africa, Italy, Gaul, and other parts
Transubstantiation - About the commencement of the century, he began to inculcate that the bread and wine of the eucharist were not truly and actually, but only figuratively, and by similitude, the body and blood of Christ; and a doctrine so rational obtained many adherents in France, Italy, and England
Serpent - The same learned writer discovers traces of the serpent worship among the Hyperboreans, at Rhodes, named Ophiusa, in Phrygia, and upon the Hellespont, in the island Cyprus, in Crete, among the Athenians, in the name of Cecrops, among the natives of Thebes in Boeotia, among the Lacedaemonians, in Italy, in Syria, &c, and in the names of many places, as well as the people where the Ophites settled
Marriage - In Spain, Italy, and the East it persisted for some time longer, as it does still among the Jews in Mohammedan countries
Gospels - Greece, Italy, Africa, and western Europe
Peter - 2:25) says Paul and Peter both planted the Roman and Corinthian churches and endured martyrdom in Italy at the same time
Papyri And Ostraca - It is therefore not such a fantastic plan that has lately been suggested in Italy, viz
Acts of the Apostles - ’ This last title was only given (as here) to a board of magistrates in Greek cities of the East; in Roman colonies in Italy the name was given to those who stood first on the Senate roll
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - After this invasion and in his desperate circumstances as the last general of Italy's last army, Stilicho apparently turned towards his worthiest enemy and felt the necessity of making terms with Alaric. ... Lastly, the empire was divided between Rome and Constantinople, but Italy between Rome and Milan or Ravenna
Persecution - Spain, Italy, and the valley of Piedmont, and other places, have been the seats of much persecution
Bible - Somewhat later several attempts were made in Italy to translate the NT into Latin
Galatia - , the barbarians who had been menacing Italy for a century began to move eastward
Hebrews Epistle to the - ‘They of Italy’ send their greeting to you
Palestine - earthquakes were unknown in Syria and Judaea, but the Archipelago and southern Italy suffered greatly
Book - But after the Saracens conquered Egypt, in the seventh century, the communication between that country and the people settled in Italy, or in other parts of Europe, was almost entirely broken off, and the papyrus was no longer in use among them
Canaan - Tacitus compares both the climate and the soil, indeed, to those of Italy; and he particularly specifies the palm tree and balsam tree as productions which gave the country an advantage over his own
Paul the Apostle - Perhaps a reconciliation had been effected; his sister’s son saved his life ( Acts 23:16 ); and the whole story of the imprisonment in Palestine and Rome and of the voyage to Italy proves that he was a prisoner of distinction
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - Italy, to be cured of their ailments or relieved of troubles, or to thank God for cures or relief already granted; how even Rome sent forth thousands on the Appian road, which became encumbered by the crowds of pilgrims, and how Nola, for a short time, became almost as populous as Rome (Ep
Bible - A translation of the Bible into the language of the Grisons, in Italy, was completed by Coir, and published in 1720
Trial-at-Law - ... In the free cities of Italy judicial procedure was modelled upon that of Rome, while the Roman coloniae and municipia were governed by prefects under jurisdiction of the praetor
Augustus (2) - At an early period of his reign Augustus had given himself to the development of a complete system of road-supervision for Italy and the provinces
Monophysitism - Hilary had also taken with him from Ephesus the appeal of Flavian for a rehearing of the case in Italy
Valentinus, Founder of a Gnostic Sect - The former of these schools was spread through Egypt and Syria, the latter in Rome, Italy, and S
Archaeology And Biblical Study - In addition, the biblical world included other regions such as Egypt, Greece, Italy, Cyprus, the Arabian Peninsula, and the large areas occupied by present-day Turkey, Iraq, and Iran
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - " Leo bestirred himself to get a new oecumenical council held in Italy: the imperial family in the West supported this, but Theodosius II
Eutyches And Eutychianism - The war in the West, the invasion of Gaul by Attila, would prevent the bishops of the West from attending a council in Italy, where he wished it to be
Bible - After their doctrine had every where attracted attention, and, in spite of the most violent opposition, had forced its way through the civilized world; and when churches or societies of Christians were collected, not only in Judea, but in the most celebrated cities of Italy, Greece, and Asia Minor, the scriptures of the New Testament were written by the Apostles, and other inspired men, and intrusted to the keeping of these churches
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - Epiphanius names as infected by it in his time, Rome and Italy, Egypt, Palestine, Arabia, Syria, Cyprus, and even Persia
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - With Theodore they probably remained till 422, when Julian returned to Italy