Places Study on Illyricum

Places Study on Illyricum

Romans 15: Through mighty signs and wonders, by the power of the Spirit of God; so that from Jerusalem, and round about unto Illyricum, I have fully preached the gospel of Christ.

Chain Links

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Illyricum
(ihl lehr' ih cuhm) Place name of uncertain meaning. A district in the Roman Empire between the Danube River and the Adriatic Sea. The Romans divided it into Dalmatia and Panhynonia. It includes modern Yugoslavia and Albania. Illyricum represented the northeastern limits of Paul's missionary work as he wrote the Romans (Romans 15:19 ), though the Bible nowhere mentions his work there. His work in Macedonia was only a few miles away, so he could easily have preached in or sent his associates to Illyricum. This does not mean he had covered all of Illyricum, only that he had introduced the gospel there in the dangerous limits of the empire. Paul had thus completed his missionary ministry of preaching the gospel and planting churches in the eastern end of the empire. Paul was now ready to preach in Rome and the western parts of the Roman Empire (Romans 15:20-24 ).



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Illyricum
The region stretching from Italy to Epirus, along the N.E. of the Adriatic. The extreme limit (probably about Dyrrachium) unto which Paul had preacher the gospel, toward Rome, when he wrote the epistle to Romans (Romans 15:19). "Dalmatia" is applied to the same region. Image. (See FORM; IDOL.)

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Illyricum
ILLYRICUM . The only Scripture mentionis Romans 15:19 , where St. Paul points to the fact that he had fully preached the good news of the Messiah from Jerusalem and round about as far as Illyricum. Neither geographical term is included in the sense of the Greek, which is that he had done so from the outer edge of Jerusalem, so to speak, round about (through various countries) as far as the border of Illyricum. These provinces in order are Syria, Cilicia, Galatia, Asia, and Macedonia, and a journey through them in succession describes a segment of a rough circle. The provinces Macedonia and Illyricum are conterminous, and the nearest city in Macedonia in which we know St. Paul to have preached is Berœa ( Acts 17:10 ff.). Illyricum is a Latin word, and denotes the Roman province which extended along the Adriatic from Italy and Pannonia on the north to the province Macedonia on the south. A province Illyria had been formed in b.c. 167, and during the succeeding two centuries all accessions of territory in that quarter were incorporated in that province. In a.d. 10 Augustus separated Pannonia from Illyricum, and gave the latter a settled constitution. The government of this important province was difficult, and was entrusted to an ex-consul with the style legatus Augusti pro prætore . The northern half was called Liburnia and the southern Dalmatia (wh. see). The latter term gradually came to indicate the whole province of Illyricum.

A. Souter.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Illyricum
(Ἰλλυρικόν)

This was the name of a Roman province bounded on the W. by the Adriatic, and extending from Pannonia on the N. to Macedonia on the S. Though so near to Italy, it was for long comparatively unknown. Strabo writing about a.d. 20 says: ‘Illyria was formerly neglected, through ignorance perhaps of its fertility; but it was principally avoided on account of the savage manners of the inhabitants, and their piratical habits’ (VII. v. 11). It was subjugated by Tiberius in a.d. 9. When St. Paul contemplated a journey by Rome to Spain, he justified his desire for fresh fields by saying that from Jerusalem and round unto Illyricum (καὶ κύκλῳ μέχρι τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ) he had fully preached the gospel of Christ (Romans 15:19).

Meyer, Gifford, and others (in loco) explain κύκλῳ as the region round Jerusalem, i.e. Judaea , Syria and Arabia. But in order to bear this sense the word would require the article. The meaning is rather that all the countries between Jerusalem and Illyricum-Syria, Cilicia, Galatia, Asia, Macedonia, Achaia-forming a rough aro of a circle, have been evangelized by the Apostle.

The words ‘unto Illyricum’ do not necessarily imply that he had preached within this province. He may be indicating the exterior rather than the interior limit. In his third journey he revisited Macedonia, and ‘having made a missionary progress through those parts’ (διελθὼν δὲ τὰ μέρη ἐκεῖνα) he came to Greece (Acts 20:2). ‘Those parts’ might include the south of Illyricum, but probably meant no more than the west of Macedonia. Strabo (vii. vii. 4), describing the Via Egnatia, which began at Dyrrachium (the modern Durazzo), notes that it traverses a part of Illyria before it enters Macedonia, and that ‘on the left are the Illyrian mountains.’

‘St. Paul would have followed this road as far as Thessalonica, and if pointing Westward he had asked the names of the mountain region and of the peoples inhabiting it, he would have been told that it was “Illyria.” The term therefore is the one which would naturally occur to him as fitted to express the limits of his journey to the West’ (Sanday-Headlam, in loco).

Writing as a Roman citizen to Christians in Rome, St. Paul avoids the ordinary Greek Ἰλλυρίς or Ἰλλυρία, and merely transliterates the Latin provincial term Illyricum. In the second half of the 1st cent. the name Dalmatia (q.v. [Note: quod vide, which see.] ), which had formerly meant the S. part of the province of Illyricum, began to be extended to the whole. For a time Illyricum and Dalmatia were convertible terms. Pliny has both; Suetonius marks the change from the one to the other; and from the Flavian period onward the term regularly used is Dalmatia. St. Paul, keeping pace with Roman usages, employs the new provincial name in a part of 2 Tim. which is generally accepted as genuine (4:10).

St. Jerome and Diocletian were Illyrians. The region now comprises Bosnia, Herzegovina, Montenegro, and N. Albania, and is as wild and unsettled as ever.

‘The eastern coast of the Adriatic is one of those ill-fated portions of the earth which, though placed in immediate contact with civilization, have remained perpetually barbarian’ (T. Arnold, Hist. of Rome, 1838-43, i. 492).

Literature.-T. Mommsen, Hist. of Rome, Eng. translation , 1894, Index, s.v.; Prov. of Rom. Emp.2, 1909, i. 199; articles s.v. in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) (Ramsay), Hastings’ Single-vol. Dictionary of the Bible (Souter), and Smith’s DGRG [Note: GRG Dict. of Greek and Roman Geography.] (E. B. James).

J. Strahan.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Illyricum
An extensive region on the east coast of the Adriatic, to which the preaching of Paul extended. Romans 15:19 . It is now nearly all embraced under the name of Dalmatia.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Illyricum
Illyricum (il-lĭr'i-kŭm). A Roman province of southeastern Europe, lying along the eastern coast of the Adriatic, from the boundary of Italy on the north to Epirus on the south, and contiguous to Mœsia and Macedonia on the east. On account of the insurrection of the Dalmatians, b.c. 11. the province was divided, and the northern portion called Dalmatia: the southern portion remained one of the Senate's provinces. Paul preached round about unto Illyricum. Romans 15:19.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Illyricum
Joy; rejoicing
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Illyricum
a province lying to the north and north-west of Macedonia, along the eastern coast of the Adriatic Gulf, or Gulf of Venice. It was distinguished into two parts: Liburnia to the north, where is now Croatia, and Dalmatia to the south, which still retains the same name, and to which, as St. Paul informs Timothy, Titus went, 2 Timothy 4:10 . St. Paul says, that he preached the Gospel from Jerusalem round about to Illyricum, Romans 15:19 .

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Illyricum
A country of Europe, lying east of the Adriatic sea, north of Epirus, and west of Macedonian. It was anciently divided into Liburnia, now Croatia, on the north, and Dalmatia on the south, which still retains its name. See Romans 15:19 .

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Illyricum
A country to the north-west of Macedonia, on the eastern shores of the Adriatic, now almost wholly comprehended in Dalmatia, a name formerly given to the southern part of Illyricum (2 Timothy 4:10 ). It was traversed by Paul in his third missionary journey (Romans 15:19 ). It was the farthest district he had reached in preaching the gospel of Christ. This reference to Illyricum is in harmony with Acts 20:2 , inasmuch as the apostle's journey over the parts of Macedonia would bring him to the borders of Illyricum.

Sentence search

Dalmatia - (dal may' tih uh) Place name referring to the southern part of Illyricum north of Greece and across the Adriatic Sea from Italy. Paul had preached in Illyricum (Romans 15:19 ). Illyricum included most of modern Yugoslavia and Albania
Dalmatia - District in Illyricum, on the east of the Adriatic Sea, visited by Titus, and perhaps by Paul, in going 'round about unto Illyricum
Illyricum - Illyricum . Paul points to the fact that he had fully preached the good news of the Messiah from Jerusalem and round about as far as Illyricum. Neither geographical term is included in the sense of the Greek, which is that he had done so from the outer edge of Jerusalem, so to speak, round about (through various countries) as far as the border of Illyricum. The provinces Macedonia and Illyricum are conterminous, and the nearest city in Macedonia in which we know St. Illyricum is a Latin word, and denotes the Roman province which extended along the Adriatic from Italy and Pannonia on the north to the province Macedonia on the south. 10 Augustus separated Pannonia from Illyricum, and gave the latter a settled constitution. The latter term gradually came to indicate the whole province of Illyricum
Illyricum - A country to the north-west of Macedonia, on the eastern shores of the Adriatic, now almost wholly comprehended in Dalmatia, a name formerly given to the southern part of Illyricum (2 Timothy 4:10 ). This reference to Illyricum is in harmony with Acts 20:2 , inasmuch as the apostle's journey over the parts of Macedonia would bring him to the borders of Illyricum
Illyricum - Illyricum (il-lĭr'i-kŭm). Paul preached round about unto Illyricum
Illyricum - Illyricum represented the northeastern limits of Paul's missionary work as he wrote the Romans (Romans 15:19 ), though the Bible nowhere mentions his work there. His work in Macedonia was only a few miles away, so he could easily have preached in or sent his associates to Illyricum. This does not mean he had covered all of Illyricum, only that he had introduced the gospel there in the dangerous limits of the empire
Dalmatia - of the Adriatic Sea, forming part of Illyricum
Dalmatia - More exactly used, it is the southern half of the Roman province Illyricum (wh
Dod'Anim - (Genesis 10:4 ; 1 Chronicles 1:7 ) Dodanim is regarded as identical with the Dardani, who were found in historical times in Illyricum and Troy
Dalmatia - A province of Europe on the east of the Adriatic sea, and forming part of Illyricum
Dalmatia - this term denoted the southern part of the Roman province of Illyricum (q. In his own missionary progress he went as far as the frontiers of Illyricum (μέχρι τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ), but probably did not enter it
Illyricum - Paul contemplated a journey by Rome to Spain, he justified his desire for fresh fields by saying that from Jerusalem and round unto Illyricum (καὶ κύκλῳ μέχρι τοῦ Ἰλλυρικοῦ) he had fully preached the gospel of Christ (Romans 15:19). The meaning is rather that all the countries between Jerusalem and Illyricum-Syria, Cilicia, Galatia, Asia, Macedonia, Achaia-forming a rough aro of a circle, have been evangelized by the Apostle. ... The words ‘unto Illyricum’ do not necessarily imply that he had preached within this province. ‘Those parts’ might include the south of Illyricum, but probably meant no more than the west of Macedonia. Paul avoids the ordinary Greek Ἰλλυρίς or Ἰλλυρία, and merely transliterates the Latin provincial term Illyricum. part of the province of Illyricum, began to be extended to the whole. For a time Illyricum and Dalmatia were convertible terms
Nicopolis - to Illyricum (Romans 15:19) and Dalmatia (2 Timothy 4:10)
Dalmatia - A mountainous country on the eastern shore of the Adriatic, a part of the Roman province of Illyricum
Dodanim - They are known in profane history as the Dardani, originally inhabiting Illyricum
Illyricum - Paul says, that he preached the Gospel from Jerusalem round about to Illyricum, Romans 15:19
Sixtus Iii, Pope Saint - He ...
approved of the Acts of the Council of Ephesus

defended the supremacy of the pope over Illyricum, against the local bishops and Proclus of Constantinople

restored the Basilica of Liberius

beautified Saint Peter's, and the Lateran Basilica
Feast, March 28,
Dodanim - Gesenius identifies them with the Dardani of Illyricum and Troy, a semi-Pelasgic race, akin to the Kittim or Chittim
Alaric - In 396 he invaded Greece, and was given the prefecture of Illyricum
Justinian i - 483-565) Eastern Roman Emperor, born Tauresium, Illyricum
Flavius Claudius Julianus - He demanded higher recognition and, when Constantius refused, advanced to Illyricum
Julian the Apostate - He demanded higher recognition and, when Constantius refused, advanced to Illyricum
Julianus, Flavius Claudius - He demanded higher recognition and, when Constantius refused, advanced to Illyricum
Apostate, Julian the - He demanded higher recognition and, when Constantius refused, advanced to Illyricum
Probus, Sextus Anicius Petronius - 371, and four times pretorian prefect of Italy, Illyricum, the Gauls, and Africa. He was appointed pretorian prefect of Italy and Illyricum in 368 (Ammian
Paulinus of Pella - Paulinus (12), son of a prefect (probably a vicarius) of Illyricum; born at Pella
Melita - The name Melita was anciently applied to two islands; one in the Adriatic Sea, on the coast of Illyricum, now called Meleda; the other in the Mediterranean, between Sicily and Africa, now called Malta
Macedonia - The great Ignatian Road joined Philippi and Thessalonica, and led toward Illyricum (Romans 15:19). , Illyricum N
Magdeburg, Centuriators of - At their head was Matthias Vlacich (Latinized Flacius), a native of Istria, the ancient Illyricum, from which he assumed the surname of IIlyricus
Centuriators of Magdeburg - At their head was Matthias Vlacich (Latinized Flacius), a native of Istria, the ancient Illyricum, from which he assumed the surname of IIlyricus
Greece - Saint Thomas and Saint Matthew also are said to have visited Greece, which formed part of Illyricum and was dependent on the Patriarchate of Rome
Greece - 146, the Romans conquered Greece, and afterwards organized two great provinces, namely, Macedonia, including Macedonia proper, Thessaly, Epirus, and Illyricum; and Achaia, including all the country, which lies south of the former province. This country was bounded north by Macedonia and Illyricum, from which it was separated by mountains, south by the Mediterranean sea, east by the Aegean sea, and west by the Ionian sea
Delegate, Apostolic - As early as the fourth century the Holy See had a permanent representative in Illyricum
Apostolic Delegate - As early as the fourth century the Holy See had a permanent representative in Illyricum
Justina, Empress - She placed her son in his hands, and induced him to undertake the delicate task of going as ambassador to Maximus, to persuade him to be contented with Gratian's provinces and to leave Valentinian in undisturbed possession of Italy, Africa, and Western Illyricum (St
Alaric - Under the title of Master-General of Eastern Illyricum, 398, he became the ally of Arcadius and secretly planned the invasion of Italy. In 404 he exchanged the prefecture of Eastern for that of Western Illyricum, and the service of Arcadius for that of Honorius, and, after the incursion and annihilation of Radagaisus and his Sclavonian hordes in 405, he was subsidized for his supposed services to the empire by the payment of 4,000 pounds of gold
Paulus i, Bishop of Constantinople - He allowed him to visit Illyricum and the remoter provinces, but forbade him to set foot again in the East
Galatia - Quitting their own country, they migrated eastward along the Danube till they came where the Saave joins that river; then dividing themselves into three bodies, under the conduct of different leaders, one of these bodies entered Pannonia; another marched into Thrace; a third into Illyricum and Macedonia
Province - practically Tunis), Gallia Narbonensis, Hispania Bætica, Achaia, Cyprus, Creta et Cyrenaica, Macedonia, Sicilia, Bithynia, Illyricum, Sardinia et Corsica
Valerianus, Emperor - The Goths and their kindred tribes poured across the Danube into Illyricum and Macedonia
Vigilius, Bishop of Rome - The bishops of Illyricum condemned the Judicatum in synod; those of N. The plan he now adopted was to persuade the emperor to summon the bishops, both of the East and West (including especially those of Africa and Illyricum who had shewn themselves so strongly opposed to the Judicatum ), to a council at Constantinople, and meanwhile to take no further steps. Justinian acted on his advice; but though the obsequious Easterns obeyed the summons, very few of the Westerns came—a small number from Italy, two from Illyricum, but none from Africa
Maximinus ii., Emperor - 307, and Galerius made Constantine and Licinius Augusti , assigning Illyricum to the latter
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - ... The affairs of eastern Illyricum occupied the attention of Celestine, as of his predecessors. of Illyricum" which Rome had entrusted to Thessalonica (Fleury, xxiv. Ephesians 3 ) to Perigenes of Corinth and eight other prelates of eastern Illyricum, asserting his right, as successor of St
Galatia - It has been noted that he, as a Roman citizen and a statesman, invariably uses geographical terms in the Roman sense, and that he even does violence to the Greek language by forcing the Latin names for ‘Philippians’ ( Philippians 4:15 ) and ‘Illyricum’ ( Romans 15:19 ) into Greek, and passes by the proper Greek term in each case
Severus, l. Septimius - In 193 he was in command of Pannonia and Illyricum
Siricius, Bishop of Rome - When the prefecture of East Illyricum had been assigned (a
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Illyricum, with its capital at Sirmium, and W. ... In 592 began a struggle in reference to discipline with certain bishops of Thessaly and Dalmatia, in the province of Illyricum. of Larissa, and the sentence had been confirmed by John of Justiniana Prima, the primate of Illyricum. Dalmatia, Illyricum, Gaul, and even Africa and the East
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - In a letter to Avitus of Vienne (517) the pope, referring to this embassy, complains of the fruitless and perfidious promises of the Greeks, but rejoices at the faithfulness of the churches of Gaul, Thrace, Dardania, and Illyricum, which had stood firm against persecution in the communion of Rome. It appears that 40 bishops of Illyricum and Greece had renounced obedience to their metropolitan of Thessalonica and sent to Hormisdas to seek communion with Rome (Theophan
Apostle - Here the third apostolic period begins, in which the twelve disappear, and Paul alone stands forth, the Apostle of the Gentiles; so that at the close of Acts, which leaves him evangelizing in Rome, the metropolis of the world, churches from Jerusalem unto Illyricum had been founded through him
Justinianus i, Emperor - —Justinian was born most probably in 483 at Tauresium, on the borders of Illyricum and Macedonia, a spot probably a little S. The bishops of Africa led the opposition, and were largely supported by those of Italy, Gaul, Illyricum, and Dalmatia. The bishops of Dalmatia and Illyricum were hottest in their opposition to the anathemas of the fifth council, and their archbp
Roman Law in the nt - ] Galatia; Illyricum (Ἰλλυρικόν), [Note: The usual Greek name or thin province is Ἰλλυρίς or Ἰλλυρία, but St. This province is also called Dalmatia in " translation="">2 Timothy 4:10, this name (which had previously been given to South Illyricum only) taking the place or the other during St
Gelasius (1) i, Bishop of Rome - Gelasius also wrote on the same subjects to the bishops of various provinces, including those of East Illyricum and Dardania
Julianus Eclanensis, Bishop of Eclana - Rufus was vicarius of the Roman see in Illyricum (Innocent's ep
Theodosius i., the Great - 19, 379, allotting him the government of the East with Illyricum in Europe
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - Martin's mother, with many more in Illyricum, became a convert to Christianity; his father remained a heathen
Apostle - Paul, who fully preached the Gospel of Christ, from Jerusalem to Illyricum, and at last died a martyr at Rome, in the time of Nero?" From this passage we may conclude, that at the beginning, of the fourth century, there were not any certain and well attested accounts of the places out of Judea, in which several of the Apostles of Christ preached; for if there had, Eusebius must have been acquainted with them
Romans, Book of - His practice had been to preach in unevangelized areas (Romans 15:20 ), and he had run out of room in the eastern empire (Romans 15:23 ), having preached from Jerusalem to Illyricum (Romans 15:19 ), at the westernmost point of the eastern empire
Gratianus, Emperor - Justina fixed her court at Sirmium; and the Western empire was perhaps nominally divided between the two brothers, Gratian having Gaul, Spain, and Britain, and Valentinian, Italy, Illyricum, and Africa (Zos
Galatians, Epistle to the - 1 Corinthians 16:5 ), ‘Macedonia,’ ‘Illyricum’ ( Romans 15:19 only; the Greeks did not use this name popularly as a substantive, and none but a Roman could so denote the province; in 2 Timothy 4:10 St
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - They first appeared in Thessaly in the time of Pompey, and in that of Valerian devastated Macedonia, Greece, Pontus, Asia, and Illyricum
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - In 398–399 Alaric was declared master-general of Eastern Illyricum by Arcadius, and raised on barbarian bucklers as king of Visigoths, with one man only between him and Rome (de Bello Getico , 503)
Roman Empire - By the arrangement of the coalition in 60 he obtained the provinces of Cisalpine Gaul and Illyricum for five years (58-54)
Paul - Paul travelled throughout Macedonia, perhaps to the borders of Illyricum, (Romans 15:19 ) and then went to Corinth
Ambrosius of Milan - From Illyricum and Thrace, especially, an immense number of captives were carried off by the barbarians, in ransoming whom the whole available resources of the church were exhausted by Ambrose; and when everything else had been taken, he did not scruple to break up and sell the sacramental vessels
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - He spoke in general terms of occupying Illyricum and Dacia, and then deciding what was to be done (Amm