Places Study on Hormah

Places Study on Hormah

Numbers 14: Then the Amalekites came down, and the Canaanites which dwelt in that hill, and smote them, and discomfited them, even unto Hormah.
Numbers 21: And the LORD hearkened to the voice of Israel, and delivered up the Canaanites; and they utterly destroyed them and their cities: and he called the name of the place Hormah.
Deuteronomy 1: And the Amorites, which dwelt in that mountain, came out against you, and chased you, as bees do, and destroyed you in Seir, even unto Hormah.
Joshua 12: The king of Hormah, one; the king of Arad, one;
Joshua 15: And Eltolad, and Chesil, and Hormah,
Joshua 19: And Eltolad, and Bethul, and Hormah,
Judges 1: And Judah went with Simeon his brother, and they slew the Canaanites that inhabited Zephath, and utterly destroyed it. And the name of the city was called Hormah.
1 Samuel 30: And to them which were in Hormah, and to them which were in Chorashan, and to them which were in Athach,
1 Chronicles 4: And at Bethuel, and at Hormah, and at Ziklag,

Chain Links

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hormah
(hawr' mah) Place name meaning, “split rock” or “cursed for destruction.” City marking the limit of the Canaanite rout of the Israelites after the failed Israelite attempt to invade Canaan that followed the report of the twelve spies (Numbers 14:45 ). Though the exact location of Hormah is not known, it was in the territory assigned to the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:4 ). Some identify it with tell Masos about seven miles east of Beersheba. Excavations have shown settlement in about 1800 B.C. and again just before 1200 B.C. The latter settlement apparently lasted until the time of David (compare 1 Samuel 30:30 ). A small fortress was built some time after 700 B.C. and destroyed shortly after 600 B.C.

The site controlled the east-west road in the Beersheba Valley and the north-south road to Hebron. Israel gained brief victory there (Numbers 21:3 ) after their earlier defeat (Numbers 14:45 ; compare Deuteronomy 1:44 ). The list of kings Joshua defeated includes Hormah (Joshua 12:14 ); the battle description says Judah and Simeon combined to take Hormah after Joshua's death (Judges 1:1 ,Judges 1:1,1:17 ), the city earlier being called Zephath. See Zephath .



Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hormah
Banning; i.e., placing under a "ban," or devoting to utter destruction. After the manifestation of God's anger against the Israelites, on account of their rebellion and their murmurings when the spies returned to the camp at Kadesh, in the wilderness of Paran, with an evil report of the land, they quickly repented of their conduct, and presumed to go up "to the head of the mountain," seeking to enter the Promised Land, but without the presence of the Lord, without the ark of the convenant, and without Moses. The Amalekites and the Canaanites came down and "smote and discomfited them even unto Hormah" (Numbers 14:45 ). This place, or perhaps the watch-tower commanding it, was originally called Zephath (Judges 1:17 ), the modern Sebaiteh. Afterwards (Numbers 21:1-3 ) Arad, the king of the Canaanites, at the close of the wanderings, when the Israelites were a second time encamped at Kadesh, "fought against them, and took some of them prisoners." But Israel vowed a vow unto the Lord utterly to destroy the cities of the Canaanites; they "banned" them, and hence the place was now called Hormah. But this "ban" was not fully executed till the time of Joshua, who finally conquered the king of this district, so that the ancient name Zephath became "Hormah" (Joshua 12:14 ; Judges 1:17 ).

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hormah
HORMAH (‘devoted’ or ‘accursed’) was a city, apparently not far from Kadesh, where the Israelites were overthrown, when, after the death of the ten spies, they insisted on going forward ( Numbers 14:45 , Deuteronomy 1:44 ). At a later time it was taken and destroyed by Israel ( Numbers 21:3 , Joshua 12:19 ), this feat being attributed in Judges 1:17 to Judah and Simeon. There we learn that the former name was Zephath . Possibly the memory of the previous disaster here led to its being called ‘Accursed.’ It was one of ‘the uttermost cities of Judah, towards the borders of Edom in the south,’ and is named between Chesll and Ziklag ( Joshua 15:30 ), also between Bethul (or Bethuel) and Ziklag ( Joshua 19:4 , 1 Chronicles 4:30 ), in the territory occupied by Simeon. It was one of the towns to which David sent a share of the booty taken from the Amalekites who had raided Ziklag in his absence ( 1 Samuel 30:30 ). There is no need to assume with Guthe ( Bibelwörterbuch, s.v .) that two cities are so named. Probably, as in so many other cases, the old name persisted, and may be represented by the modern es-Sebaitâ , 23 miles north of ‘Ain Kadîs , and 26 miles south of Beersheba. The probability is increased if Ziklag is correctly identified with ‘Aslûj , 14 miles north of es-Sebaitâ . On the other hand, Naqb es-Safâ agrees better with the position of Arad; but it seems too far from Kadesh, being more than 40 miles to the north-east (Robinson, BRP [Note: RP Biblical Researches in Palestine.] 9 ii. 181).

W. Ewing.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hormah
Joshua (Joshua 12:14) struck its king. In ancient times, Zephath (Judges 1:17). Capital of a Canaanite tribe in S. Palestine. Taken by Judah and Simeon (Judges 1:17). Judah appropriated it (Joshua 15:30; 1 Samuel 26:30). But Simeon's territory was so blended with that of Judah that elsewhere it is enumerated among Simeon's towns (1 Chronicles 4:30). In Numbers 14:45 it is called Hormah by anticipation. After Israel's unbelief, consequent on the spies' report, and subsequent presumptuous advance toward Canaan, in defiance of the Lord who no longer would go with them since they had refused to go when He invited them, the Amalekites from the hill "smote them and discomfited them even unto Hormah" Then followed the wandering in the wilderness for 38 years.

Then they came again to Hormah (Numbers 21:3), i.e. the place under the ban (Leviticus 27:28-29), devoted to destruction. "Zephath" is compared with es Safah on the S.E. frontier of Canaan, the pass by which Israel probably ascended from the Et Tih desert and the Arabah. Rowlands however identifies it with Sebatah where are extensive ruins, and near is a ruined fortress El Meshrifeh, the presumed site of the "watchtower." The site suggested in the Speaker's Commentary is some miles E. of Sebatah, namely, Rakhmah, an anagram of Hormah, the more permanent name. Israel marching N.N.W. from the Arabah, past Rakhmah or Hormah, would come to the wide plain, es Sir, the "Seir" of Deuteronomy 1:44.

Twenty miles' further march would have brought them to Arad royal city (Numbers 21:1); but before they could reach it the king drove them back to Hormah Numbers 15-19 belong to the dreary period of the 38 years' wandering after a year spent at Sinai; Numbers 20 presents them at the same point they started from 38 years before, Kadesh, in the 40th year; Numbers 21 introduces Arad assailing Israel and taking prisoners, then defeated by Israel in answer to prayer, and Hormah utterly destroyed. Israel not wishing to remain there marched S.E.

The Canaanites reoccupied the place and restored it under the old name Zephath. Not until northern Canaan was subdued did Israel reach it again in the extreme S., and Joshua conquered the king. Finally under the judges Judah and Simeon consummated the ban of Moses and his contemporaries on it, so that henceforth its name was permanently Hormah. This sets aside the objection to Numbers 14:45 and Numbers 21:3 as if these passages were post-Mosaic because of Judges 1:17.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Hormah
Devoted or consecrated to God; utter destruction
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hormah
The name signifying 'utter destruction' given to ZEPHATHin the far south when conquered by Judah and Simeon. Numbers 14:45 ; Numbers 21:3 ; Deuteronomy 1:44 ; Joshua 12:14 ; Judges 1:17 ;

1 Samuel 30:30 ; 1 Chronicles 4:30 . Identified by some with ruins at S'baita, 30 52' N, 34 42' E .

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hormah
Destruction, Numbers 21:1-3 ; also called Zephath; a city in the extreme south of Canaan, near which the rebellious Hebrews were defeated, in the second year after leaving Egypt, Numbers 14:45 ; it was afterwards laid waste, Judges 1:16,17 . The Simeonites repeopled it, Joshua 19:4 , and David sent them some of his spoils taken from the Amalekites, 1 Samuel 30:30 .

Sentence search

ze'Phath - (watch-tower ), the earlier name, ( Judges 1:17 ) of a Canaanite town, which after its capture and destruction was called by the Israelites Hormah. [Hormah ]
Zephath - See Hormah
Bethmarcaboth - Town of Simeon in the extreme south, with Ziklag and Hormah
Hormah - In Numbers 14:45 it is called Hormah by anticipation. After Israel's unbelief, consequent on the spies' report, and subsequent presumptuous advance toward Canaan, in defiance of the Lord who no longer would go with them since they had refused to go when He invited them, the Amalekites from the hill "smote them and discomfited them even unto Hormah" Then followed the wandering in the wilderness for 38 years. ... Then they came again to Hormah (Numbers 21:3), i. of Sebatah, namely, Rakhmah, an anagram of Hormah, the more permanent name. from the Arabah, past Rakhmah or Hormah, would come to the wide plain, es Sir, the "Seir" of Deuteronomy 1:44. ... Twenty miles' further march would have brought them to Arad royal city (Numbers 21:1); but before they could reach it the king drove them back to Hormah Numbers 15-19 belong to the dreary period of the 38 years' wandering after a year spent at Sinai; Numbers 20 presents them at the same point they started from 38 years before, Kadesh, in the 40th year; Numbers 21 introduces Arad assailing Israel and taking prisoners, then defeated by Israel in answer to prayer, and Hormah utterly destroyed. Finally under the judges Judah and Simeon consummated the ban of Moses and his contemporaries on it, so that henceforth its name was permanently Hormah
Zephath - Beacon; watch-tower, a Canaanite town; called also Hormah (q
be'Thul - (dweller in God ) a town of Simeon in the south named with Eltolad and Hormah, ( Joshua 19:4 ) called also Chesil and Bethuel
Hormah - Though the exact location of Hormah is not known, it was in the territory assigned to the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:4 ). The list of kings Joshua defeated includes Hormah (Joshua 12:14 ); the battle description says Judah and Simeon combined to take Hormah after Joshua's death (Judges 1:1 ,Judges 1:1,1:17 ), the city earlier being called Zephath
Madmannah - A town in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:31 ), named with Hormah and Ziklag
Hormah - The Amalekites and the Canaanites came down and "smote and discomfited them even unto Hormah" (Numbers 14:45 ). " But Israel vowed a vow unto the Lord utterly to destroy the cities of the Canaanites; they "banned" them, and hence the place was now called Hormah. But this "ban" was not fully executed till the time of Joshua, who finally conquered the king of this district, so that the ancient name Zephath became "Hormah" (Joshua 12:14 ; Judges 1:17 )
Zephath - A Canaanite town, called after its destruction by Israel (See Hormah . But Speaker's Commentary, "Rakhmah," an anagram of Hormah, some miles E
Zephath - Following their destruction of the city, the tribes of Judah and Simeon renamed the site Hormah (Judges 1:17 )
Zephath - A Canaanitish city afterwards called Hormah, one of the "uttermost cities of Judah southwards," afterwards assigned to Simeon, Joshua 12:14 15:30 19:4
am'Alekites, - (Exodus 17:8-16 ) In union with the Canaanites they again attacked the Israelites on the borders of Palestine, and defeated them near Hormah
Amalekite - They afterwards attacked the Israelites at Hormah (Numbers 14:45 )
Devoted Thing - So Israel utterly destroyed the Canaanites at Hormah (Numbers 21:2-3; Deuteronomy 13:12-18)
Ziklag - A city in southern Judah, associated with Chesil and Hormah (Joshua 15:31; Joshua 19:5; 1 Chronicles 4:30)
Arad - He was successful temporarily, taking captives; but after vowing to God that they would destroy the city, Israel struck back effectively and renamed the devastated city Hormah
Hormah - Hormah (‘devoted’ or ‘accursed’) was a city, apparently not far from Kadesh, where the Israelites were overthrown, when, after the death of the ten spies, they insisted on going forward ( Numbers 14:45 , Deuteronomy 1:44 )
Simeon - Together they attacked and defeated the inhabitants of Zephath-Hormah. Hormah is connected with Arad ( Numbers 21:1-6 ) about 17 miles to the S. Hormah in Joshua 15:30 is assigned to the tribe of Judah, but re-appears in Joshua 19:4 as a city of Simeon
Kadesh - (See Hormah; KORAH
Kadesh - (See Hormah; KORAH
Bee - The allusion, therefore, of Moses to their fierce hostility, Deuteronomy 1:44 , is both just and beautiful: "The Amorites, which dwelt in that mountain, came out against you, and chased you as bees do, and destroyed you in Seir even unto Hormah
Anathema - " Therefore they called that place Hormah (CHormah ), i
Sinai - ... To the north stand el Μeshrifeh or Ζephath "the watchtower," and Sbaita, all built of stone, without timber, "the city of the Zephath," afterward called Hormah (Judges 1:17)
Arabah - of which stood Hormah and Kadesh
Amalekites - The Amalekites are mentioned with the Canaanites as having discomfited Israel at Hormah, on the borders of Canaan, permitted by God because of Israel's unbelief as to the spies' report, and then presumption in going up to possess the land in spite of Moses' warning and the non-accompaniment of the ark (Numbers 14:43-45)
Numbers, Book of - Hormah. ] ), ( u ) Hormah is connected with hçrem ,‘ban,’ because of the vow to destroy ban the Canaanite cities
Moses - The Canaanites were defeated at Hormah (perh
mo'Ses - Against his advice took place the first disastrous battle at Hormah
Numbers, the Book of - (See Hormah
Moses - ... Too late they repented of their unbelieving cowardice, when Moses announced God's sentence, and in spite of Moses' warning presumed to go, but were chased by the Amalekites to Hormah (Deuteronomy 1:45-46; Deuteronomy 2:14; Numbers 14:39)
Moses - ... The people now, to repair their fault, contrary to the advice of Moses, presumptuously went to invade the Amalekites and Canaanites of Mount Seir, or Hor; who defeated them, and chased them as bees to Hormah, Numbers 14:39-45 ; Deuteronomy 1:41-44