Places Study on Ezion-geber

Places Study on Ezion-geber

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Holman Bible Dictionary - Ezion-geber
A port city on the gulf of Aqabah. Ezion-Geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). Under Solomon the city became a major port. Solomon commissioned the building of a fleet of ships there for use in the gold trade (1Kings 9:26,1 Kings 9:28 ). Other goods transported through the port included silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks (1 Kings 10:22 ). After Solomon's death the city reverted to Edomite control. Jehoshopat tried to take advantage of the absence of an Edomite king to base a new fleet in the city (1 Kings 22:48-49 ). The fleet was, however, wrecked (whether by flood, tempest, or the Edomites is unknown).

Three sites have been identified with Ezion-Geber. Some identify the city with Elath. References mentioning both names point to two places (Deuteronomy 2:8 ; 1 Kings 9:26 ; 2 Chronicles 8:17 ). Others locate Ezion-Geber at Tell el-Kheleifeh, a site about 500 yards from the coast. This site may represent a satellite city used to store grain, to protect the trade route, or to serve as a stopping place for caravans. Frequent flooding of the Wadi Ytem may have washed away archeological evidence necessary for identification of Ezion-Geber. Still others connect Ezion-Geber with a site on the island of Jezira Fara'un about 300 yards from the shore at Eilat. This site seems an unlikely stopping place during the wilderness wandering.



Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ezion-geber
The giant's backbone (so called from the head of a mountain which runs out into the sea), an ancient city and harbour at the north-east end of the Elanitic branch of the Red Sea, the Gulf of Akabah, near Elath or Eloth (Numbers 33:35 ; Deuteronomy 2:8 ). Here Solomon built ships, "Tarshish ships," like those trading from Tyre to Tarshish and the west, which traded with Ophir (1 Kings 9:26 ; 2 Chronicles 8:17 ); and here also Jehoshaphat's fleet was shipwrecked (1 Kings 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 20:36 ). It became a populous town, many of the Jews settling in it (2 Kings 16:6 , "Elath"). It is supposed that anciently the north end of the gulf flowed further into the country than now, as far as 'Ain el-Ghudyan, which Isaiah 10 miles up the dry bed of the Arabah, and that Ezion-geber may have been there.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Ezion-geber
A port city on the gulf of Aqabah. Ezion-Geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). Under Solomon the city became a major port. Solomon commissioned the building of a fleet of ships there for use in the gold trade (1Kings 9:26,1 Kings 9:28 ). Other goods transported through the port included silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks (1 Kings 10:22 ). After Solomon's death the city reverted to Edomite control. Jehoshopat tried to take advantage of the absence of an Edomite king to base a new fleet in the city (1 Kings 22:48-49 ). The fleet was, however, wrecked (whether by flood, tempest, or the Edomites is unknown). Three sites have been identified with Ezion-Geber. Some identify the city with Elath. References mentioning both names point to two places (Deuteronomy 2:8 ; 1 Kings 9:26 ; 2 Chronicles 8:17 ). Others locate Ezion-Geber at Tell el-Kheleifeh, a site about 500 yards from the coast. This site may represent a satellite city used to store grain, to protect the trade route, or to serve as a stopping place for caravans. Frequent flooding of the Wadi Ytem may have washed away archeological evidence necessary for identification of Ezion-Geber. Still others connect Ezion-Geber with a site on the island of Jezira Fara'un about 300 yards from the shore at Eilat. This site seems an unlikely stopping place during the wilderness wandering.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ezion Geber
("the giant's backbone".) A town on the eastern arm of the Red Sea. The last stage in Israel's march before the wilderness of Zin or Kadesh. The station of Solomon's navy "beside Eloth, on the shore of the Red Sea, in the land of Edom." The timber was probably brought to Ezion Geber from Tyre to build the ships (2 Chronicles 8:17-18). There Jehoshaphat's fleet was broken on the jagged rocks on each side (1 Kings 9:26; 1 Kings 22:48). Now wady Ghadyan (another form of Ezion), a valley running E. into the Arabah, some miles N. of the present head of the Elanitic gulf. A salt marsh marks where the sea anciently reached. A tidal haven was here, at the head of which the city of Ezion Geber stood. On the haven's eastern side lay Elath (now Akaba), from whence the Elanitic gulf took its name, meaning "trees"; a palm grove is still there; on the W. lay Ebronah (Numbers 33:35-36).

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ezion-geber
EZION-GEBER , later called Berenice (Jos. [Note: Josephus.] Ant . VIII. vi. 4). A port on the Red Sea (on the Gulf of Akabah) used by Solomon for his commerce ( 1 Kings 9:26 ). Here also the Israelites encamped ( Numbers 33:35 , Deuteronomy 2:8 ).

A. J. Maclean.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Ezion-geber
The wood of the man
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ezion-geber
Ezion-geber (along with its twin town Elath, or Eloth) was situated on the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqabah, the north-eastern arm of the Red Sea. It was the port from which shipping routes went east and overland routes went north (Deuteronomy 2:8; 1 Kings 9:26). This meant that the nation that controlled Ezion-geber controlled much of the trade in the region (1 Kings 9:27-28; 1 Kings 10:22). (For fuller details of Ezion-geber’s significance see EDOM.)

Sentence search

Ezion-Gaber - KJV variant spelling of Ezion-geber (Numbers 33:35-36 ; Deuteronomy 2:8 ; 2 Chronicles 20:36 ). See Ezion-geber
Elath - See Ezion-geber
Elath - It was significant enough to serve as a point of reference to identify Ezion-geber, where King Solomon made his naval vessels (1 Kings 9:26 ; compare 2 Chronicles 8:17-18 ). Archaeologists have usually identified Elath as another name for Ezion-geber and located it at tell el-Kheleifeh. More recent archaeological work has attempted to show that Ezion-geber was the port city on the island of Jezirat Faraun. See Ezion-geber
Fleet - Solomon built a fleet of ships at Ezion-geber with the help of Hiram of Tyre (1 Kings 9:26-27 ; 1Kings 10:11,1 Kings 10:22 ). See Ezion-geber ; Ships, Sailors, and Navigation
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). ... Three sites have been identified with Ezion-geber. Others locate Ezion-geber at Tell el-Kheleifeh, a site about 500 yards from the coast. Frequent flooding of the Wadi Ytem may have washed away archeological evidence necessary for identification of Ezion-geber. Still others connect Ezion-geber with a site on the island of Jezira Fara'un about 300 yards from the shore at Eilat
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-geber was the last stopping place before Kadesh during the wilderness wandering (Numbers 33:35-36 ). Three sites have been identified with Ezion-geber. Others locate Ezion-geber at Tell el-Kheleifeh, a site about 500 yards from the coast. Frequent flooding of the Wadi Ytem may have washed away archeological evidence necessary for identification of Ezion-geber. Still others connect Ezion-geber with a site on the island of Jezira Fara'un about 300 yards from the shore at Eilat
Ebronah - It was near Ezion-geber
Ebro'Nah - (passage ), one of the halting-places of the Israelites in the desert, immediately preceding Ezion-geber
Refine - See Crucible ; Ezion-geber ; Furnace ; Minerals and Metals ; Mines and Mining
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-geber (along with its twin town Elath, or Eloth) was situated on the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqabah, the north-eastern arm of the Red Sea. This meant that the nation that controlled Ezion-geber controlled much of the trade in the region (1 Kings 9:27-28; 1 Kings 10:22). (For fuller details of Ezion-geber’s significance see EDOM
Aqaba, Gulf of - See Eloth ; Ezion-geber
Abronah - Its location is not known, but it is apparently close to Ezion-geber at the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba
Ezion-Geber - Ezion-geber , later called Berenice (Jos
Rissah -
Paran - It was located south of Kadesh-barnea and west of Ezion-geber
Elath -
Elath - It is also mentioned along with Ezion-geber in 1 Kings 9:26
Elath - arm of the Red Sea, near Ezion-geber
Edom - The other important population centres of Edom were the twin towns of Ezion-geber and Elath on the Gulf of Aqabah (Deuteronomy 2:8; 2 Chronicles 8:17). From Ezion-geber it went north over the mountainous plateau on the east of the Arabah to Moab, Ammon and Syria. Solomon in turn established a fleet of ocean-going ships at Ezion-geber. ... The strategic and economic importance of Ezion-geber and Elath was one cause of later conflicts between Judah and Edom. Under Amaziah, Judah conquered the mountain regions of Edom, and under Azariah it took control of Ezion-geber (2 Kings 14:7; 2 Kings 14:22). Judah lost Ezion-geber to Edom in the reign of Ahaz and never regained it (2 Kings 16:6)
Hazeroth - Some geographers would locate it at moder ain Khadra, south of Ezion-geber
e'Lath, e'Loth - (a grove ), the name of a town of the land of Edom, commonly mentioned with Ezion-geber, and situated at the head of the Arabian Gulf, which was thence called the Elanitic Gulf
Ships - Solomon constructed a navy at Ezion-geber by the assistance of Hiram's sailors (1 Kings 9:26-28 ; 2 Chronicles 8:18 )
Tarshish - The LXX translate Tarshish sometimes by "the sea;" and the Scripture gives the names of ships of Tarshish to those that were fitted out at Ezion-geber, on the Red Sea, and which sailed upon the ocean, as well as to those that were fitted out at Joppa, and in the ports of the Mediterranean. Therefore, when we see ships fitted out upon the Red Sea, or at Ezion-geber, in order to go to Tarshish, we must conclude one of these two things, either that there were two countries called Tarshish, one upon the ocean, and another upon the Mediterranean, or that ships of Tarshish in general signifies nothing else but ships able to bear a long voyage; large merchant ships, in opposition to the small craft intended for a home trade in navigable rivers
Elath, Eloth - First mentioned in the wanderings of the Israelites; it was afterwards included in the dominion of Solomon, near to which, at Ezion-geber, he had a navy of ships
Edom - Its principal towns were Bozrah, Elath, Maon, Ezion-geber, Selah or Petra
Ezion-Geber - It is supposed that anciently the north end of the gulf flowed further into the country than now, as far as 'Ain el-Ghudyan, which Isaiah 10 miles up the dry bed of the Arabah, and that Ezion-geber may have been there
Tarshish, Tharshish - But other passages refer to apes and peacocks, also being brought by ships of Tarshish, and these are associated with Ezion-geber, on the Gulf of Akaba, a branch of the Red Sea
Elath - The Edomites being subdued, 2 Samuel 8:14, David took possession of Elath or Eloth: and after him Solomon, whose fleet sailed from the neighboring town Ezion-geber to Ophir
Ship -
Jehosh'Aphat - (2 Chronicles 19:2 ) He built at Ezion-geber, with the help of Ahaziah, a navy designed to go to Tarshish; but it was wrecked at Ezion-geber
Elath - The modern Arabian town of Akaba stands upon or near the site either of Elath or Ezion-geber; which of the two it is impossible to determine, as both ports, standing at the head of the gulf, were probably separated from each other by a creek or small bay only
Ophir - The only passages which give us any information as to the location of Ophir are 1 Kings 9:26-28 10:11,22 22:48 , with the parallel passages in 2 Chronicles 8:18 9:10,21 20:36,37 ; from which it appears that the so called "ships of Tarshish" went to Ophir; that these ships sailed from Ezion-geber, a port of the Red Sea; that a voyage was made once in three years; that the fleet returned freighted with gold, peacocks, apes, spices, ivory, algumwood, and ebony
Tarshish - Solomon's (1 Kings 10:22 ; 2 Chronicles 9:21 ) and Jehoshaphat's (1 Kings 22:48 ; 2 Chronicles 20:36 ) fleets were based at Ezion-geber on the Red Sea
Kadesh-Barnea - The true situation of Kadesh is ascertained beyond a doubt, from its lying between Mount Hor and Ezion-geber, on the Elanitic Gulf, Numbers 33:35-37
Seir - ... SEIR, MOUNT, a mountainous tract, extending from the southern extremity of the Dead Sea, to the Gulf of Acaba, or Ezion-geber. and so to "compass the land of Edom by the way of the Red Sea," that is, to descend to its southern extremity at Ezion-geber, as they could not penetrate it higher up
Tarshish - Whether the ships fitted out by Solomon at Ezion-geber on the Red sea, sailed around Africa to Tarshish in Spain, or gave the name of Tarshish to some place in India of Ethiopia, as the discovers of America gave it the eastern names India and Indians, cannot now be determined, 1 Kings 10:22 22:48,49 2 Chronicles 9:21 20:26 Isaiah 23:1,14 60:9
Tar'Shish - Thus, with regard to the ships of Tarshish, which Jehoshaphat caused to be constructed at Ezion-geber on the Elanitic Gulf of the Red Sea, (1 Kings 22:48 ) it is said in the Chronicles, (2 Chronicles 20:36 ) that they were made to go to Tarshish; and in like manner the navy of ships, which Solomon had previously made in Ezion-geber, (1 Kings 9:26 ) is said in the Chronicles, (2 Chronicles 9:21 ) to have gone to Tarshish with the servants of Hiram
Red Sea - Only two ports, Elath and Ezion-geber, are mentioned in the Bible. " Three centuries later, Solomon's navy was built "in Ezion-geber, which is beside Eloth, on the shore of the Red Sea (Yam Suph), in the land of Edom. " ( 1 Kings 9:20 ) The kingdom of Solomon extended as far as the Red Sea, upon which he possessed the harbors of Elath and Ezion-geber. [ELATH ; Ezion-geber] It is possible that the sea has retired here as at Suez, and that Ezion-geber is now dry land. Jehoshaphat also "made ships of Tharshish to go to Ophir for gold; but they went not; for the ships were broken at Ezion-geber
Solomon - Solomon also established a navy of snips at the port of Ezion-geber, on the Red Sea
Edom - Thus we read that Solomon built a fleet of ships at Ezion-geber and sent them to distant places for exotic goods. This would have involved Edomite attacks on Solomon's caravans which passed through traditionally Edomite territory from Ezion-geber to Jerusalem (1 Kings 11:14-22 ). Once again we read of a Judean attempt (unsuccessful this time) to undertake a shipping venture from Ezion-geber (1 Kings 22:47-50 )
Tarshish (1) - The name is used of the ships of Jehoshaphat and Abaziah, which sailed for Ophir from Ezion-geber ( 1 Kings 22:48 , 2 Chronicles 20:36 )
Ophir - It has been disputed whether South or East Arabia was the true Ophir; the only datum is the length of the voyage thither from Ezion-geber eighteen months, as the double voyage took three years ( 1 Kings 10:22 )
o'Phir - In five passages Ophir is mentioned by name - (1 Kings 9:28 ; 10:11 ; 22:18 ; 2 Chronicles 8:18 ; 9:10 ) If the three passages of the book of Kings are carefully examined, it will be seen that all the information given respecting Ophir is that it was a place or region accessible by sea from Ezion-geber on the Red Sea, from which imports of gold, almug trees and precious stones were brought back by the Tyrian and Hebrew sailors
e'Dom, Idumae'a - ( 2 Kings 14:7 ) Elath and Ezion-geber were the seaports
Red Sea - At the harbour of Ezion-geber (near to, or perhaps the same as, Elath), at its northern end, Solomon built his navy, with the help of Phœnician seamen ( 1 Kings 9:26 ), and sent out expeditions to India
Red Sea - In the prosperous reign of Solomon he "made a navy of ships" at Ezion-geber and Elath, which were ports at the head of the Gulf of Akabah
Ahaz - Ahaz suffered further losses at the hands of invading Edomites and Philistines, and lost control of the important Red Sea port of Elath (Ezion-geber) (2 Kings 16:6; 2 Chronicles 28:17-18)
Ship - ... In the time of the Israelite monarchy, King Hiram of Phoenicia and King Solomon of Israel established a fleet of ships to operate between the Red Sea port of Ezion-geber and India
Hiram - Hiram sent also in the navy expert shipmen to Ophir from Ezion-geber, with Solomon's servants; and a navy
Edom -
Solomon - See Eloth ; Ezion-geber
Tadmor - Solomon was at great pains to secure himself in the possession of the ports of Elath and Ezion-geber on the Red Sea, and to establish a navy for his Indian commerce, or trade to Ophir,—in all ages the great source of wealth
Wanderings in the Wilderness - A later reference to the distance between Mount Sinai (Horeb) and Kadesh-barnea (Deuteronomy 1:2 ) seems to suggest that the early itinerary took them basically along the major trade route used by the Amalekites between modern Suez at the northern end of the Gulf of Suez and the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba (Elath and Ezion-geber) and then northward into the extensive clustering of oases at Kadesh that would become their tribal center and the location of the tabernacle during the next 38 years
Red Sea - The western arm is the Gulf of Suez (Numbers 33:10) and the eastern arm the Gulf of Aqabah (Numbers 14:25; Numbers 21:4; 1 Kings 9:26; see also Ezion-geber)
Canaan, Land of - This is not so far south as the country over which Solomon had dominion, which extended to Ezion-geber on the gulf of Akaba
Transportation And Travel - As a result, an additional journey overland was required to transport agricultural and other trade goods to and from the ports of Ezion-geber (1 Kings 9:26-28 ) on the Red Sea and the Phoenician ports of Tyre and Sidon to the cities of Israel. For instance, king Jehoshaphat of Judah rejected further attempts to obtain gold from Ophir after his first fleet of ships was sunk off Ezion-geber (1 Kings 22:48-49 )
Solomon - Goods from the Mediterranean were collected at Hiram’s port of Tyre, carried overland to Israel’s Red Sea port of Ezion-geber, then shipped east (1 Kings 9:26-28; 1 Kings 10:22; for map see PHOENICIA)
Ships And Boats - They were stationed at Ezion-geber , at the head of the Gulf of Akabah, and traded with Ophir, probably in the southeast of Arabia, in gold and precious stones ( 1 Kings 9:26-28 ). ... The conflict between the Northern and Southern Kingdoms after Solomon’s death put a stop to the commercial activities of the Jews, and there does not appear to have been any attempt to revive them till the time of Jehoshaphat, whose fleet of ships made for trading for gold to Ophir was wrecked at Ezion-geber
Arabia -
Edom -
Solomon - He fitted out a fleet at Ezion-geber, and at Elath, on the Red Sea, to go to Ophir
Canaan - On the south it included Edom, and reached the Red sea at Ezion-geber
Commerce - The Aqaba port of Elath (Ezion-geber) served the needs of the court of Solomon and subsequent kings as well
Numbers, Book of - ] contain places on the northward march from Ezion-geber on the Gulf of Akabah; Deuteronomy 10:6-9 gives the previous march southward from Kadesh
Solomon - , and, above all, access to the port of Ezion-geber on the Red Sea, made possible by his suzerainty over Edom
Economic Life - Ezion-geber, a port on the Red Sea, was acquired from the Edomites and serviced a fleet of ships bringing gold from Ophir and rare woods and other luxury items to the royal court (1 Kings 9:26 ; 1 Kings 10:11-12 )
Trade And Commerce - If it was obtained in exchange for commodities, we must suppose either that the latter were identical with those of which we afterwards read in Ezekiel, or that the commodities to be exchanged were all supplied by the Phœnicians, the service by which the Israelites earned their share being that of giving the former access to the harbour of Ezion-geber
Canaan -
Jerusalem - It was resorted to at the festivals by the whole population of the country; and the power and commercial spirit of Solomon, improving the advantages acquired by his father David, centred in it most of the eastern trade, both by sea, through the ports of Elath and Ezion-geber, and over land, by the way of Tadmor or Palmyra