Places Study on Eden

Places Study on Eden

Genesis 2: And the LORD God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed.
Genesis 2: And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads.
Genesis 2: And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.
Genesis 3: Therefore the LORD God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken.
Genesis 3: So he drove out the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.
Genesis 4: And Cain went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden.
2 Kings 19: Have the gods of the nations delivered them which my fathers have destroyed; as Gozan, and Haran, and Rezeph, and the children of Eden which were in Thelasar?
2 Chronicles 29: Then the Levites arose, Mahath the son of Amasai, and Joel the son of Azariah, of the sons of the Kohathites: and of the sons of Merari, Kish the son of Abdi, and Azariah the son of Jehalelel: and of the Gershonites; Joah the son of Zimmah, and Eden the son of Joah:
2 Chronicles 31: And next him were Eden, and Miniamin, and Jeshua, and Shemaiah, Amariah, and Shecaniah, in the cities of the priests, in their set office, to give to their brethren by courses, as well to the great as to the small:
Isaiah 37: Have the gods of the nations delivered them which my fathers have destroyed, as Gozan, and Haran, and Rezeph, and the children of Eden which were in Telassar?
Isaiah 51: For the LORD shall comfort Zion: he will comfort all her waste places; and he will make her wilderness like Eden, and her desert like the garden of the LORD; joy and gladness shall be found therein, thanksgiving, and the voice of melody.
Ezekiel 27: Haran, and Canneh, and Eden, the merchants of Sheba, Asshur, and Chilmad, were thy merchants.
Ezekiel 28: Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the sardius, topaz, and the diamond, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the emerald, and the carbuncle, and gold: the workmanship of thy tabrets and of thy pipes was prepared in thee in the day that thou wast created.
Ezekiel 31: I have made him fair by the multitude of his branches: so that all the trees of Eden, that were in the garden of God, envied him.
Ezekiel 31: I made the nations to shake at the sound of his fall, when I cast him down to hell with them that descend into the pit: and all the trees of Eden, the choice and best of Lebanon, all that drink water, shall be comforted in the nether parts of the earth.
Ezekiel 31: To whom art thou thus like in glory and in greatness among the trees of Eden? yet shalt thou be brought down with the trees of Eden unto the nether parts of the earth: thou shalt lie in the midst of the uncircumcised with them that be slain by the sword. This is Pharaoh and all his multitude, saith the Lord GOD.
Ezekiel 36: And they shall say, This land that was desolate is become like the garden of Eden; and the waste and desolate and ruined cities are become fenced, and are inhabited.
Joel 2: A fire devoureth before them; and behind them a flame burneth: the land is as the garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness; yea, and nothing shall escape them.
Amos 1: I will break also the bar of Damascus, and cut off the inhabitant from the plain of Aven, and him that holdeth the sceptre from the house of Eden: and the people of Syria shall go into captivity unto Kir, saith the LORD.

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Dictionary

Chabad Knowledge Base - Gan Eden
(lit. the Garden of Eden): the spiritual realm of souls in the afterlife.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Eden
Delight.
The garden in which our first parents dewlt (Genesis 2:8-17 ). No geographical question has been so much discussed as that bearing on its site. It has been placed in Armenia, in the region west of the Caspian Sea, in Media, near Damascus, in Palestine, in Southern Arabia, and in Babylonia. The site must undoubtedly be sought for somewhere along the course of the great streams the Tigris and the Euphrates of Western Asia, in "the land of Shinar" or Babylonia. The region from about lat. 33 degrees 30' to lat. 31 degrees, which is a very rich and fertile tract, has been by the most competent authorities agreed on as the probable site of Eden. "It is a region where streams abound, where they divide and re-unite, where alone in the Mesopotamian tract can be found the phenomenon of a single river parting into four arms, each of which is or has been a river of consequence." Among almost all nations there are traditions of the primitive innocence of our race in the garden of Eden. This was the "golden age" to which the Greeks looked back. Men then lived a "life free from care, and without labour and sorrow. Old age was unknown; the body never lost its vigour; existence was a perpetual feast without a taint of evil. The earth brought forth spontaneously all things that were good in profuse abundance."





One of the markets whence the merchants of Tyre obtained richly embroidered stuffs (Ezekiel 27:23 ); the same, probably, as that mentioned in 2 Kings 19:12 , and Isaiah 37:12 , as the name of a region conquered by the Assyrians.



Son of Joah, and one of the Levites who assisted in reforming the public worship of the sanctuary in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 ).


Chabad Knowledge Base - Garden of Eden
The place in which the narrative of Adam, Eve and the sin of the Tree of Knowledge occurred.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Beth-Eden
(behth-ee' dehn) Place name meaning, “house of bliss.” Amos announced God's threat to take the royal house out of Beth-eden or the “house of Eden” (KJV) (Amos 1:5 ). He was obviously referring to a place in Syria. Assyrian records refer to Bit-adini, a city-state between the Euphrates and Balik rivers, somewhat north of Syria proper. Ashurbanipal II conquered it in 856 B.C. An Assyrian representative bragged about conquering Beth-Eden, urging Hezekiah to surrender about 701 B.C. (2 Kings 19:12 ). Ezekiel included Eden as one of the states who had traded with Tyre (Ezekiel 27:23 ).



Holman Bible Dictionary - Eden
(ee' dehn) Garden of God. “Eden” is probably derived from the Sumerian-Akkadian edinu, meaning “flatland” or “wilderness.” The similarity to the Hebrew verb adan , meaning “delight” or “pleasure,” resulted in the Septuagint's translation of the expression “garden of Eden” as “garden of delight,” hence paradise.

“Eden” appears twenty times in the Old Testament but never in the New Testament. Two usage's refer to men (2 Chronicles 29:12 ; 2 Chronicles 31:15 ). Twice the name is used to designate a city or region in the Assyrian province of Thelassar (Isaiah 37:12 ; 2 Kings 19:12 ). Ezekiel 27:23 mentions a region named Eden located on the Euphrates. Amos 1:5 refers to the ruler of Damascus as holding the scepter of the house of Eden.

The fourteen remaining appearances relate to the idyllic place of creation. In Genesis (Genesis 2:8 ,Genesis 2:8,2:10 ,Genesis 2:10,2:15 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Genesis 4:16 ) the reference is to the region in which a garden was placed. Though details seem precise, identification of the rivers which flow from the river issuing forth from Eden cannot be accomplished with certainty. The Euphrates and the Tigris can be identified, but there is no agreement on the location of the Pishon and the Gihon.

Joel 2:3 compares Judah's condition before its destruction with Eden. In Isaiah 51:3 and Ezekiel 36:35 , Eden is used as an illustration of the great prosperity God would bestow on Judah. These exilic prophets promised that the nation God restored after the Exile would be like Eden's garden. Ezekiel also refers to the trees of Eden (Ezekiel 31:9 ,Ezekiel 31:9,31:16 ,Ezekiel 31:16,31:18 ) and calls Eden the garden of God (Ezekiel 28:13 ). See Paradise .

Robert Anderson Street



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Eden
("delight".) ("Paradise",) the Septuagint translation of "garden," a park and pleasure ground. From the Zendic pairidaeza , a hedging round. In N.W. Mesopotamia an Eden is mentioned near the Tigris (2 Kings 19:12; Isaiah 37:12; Ezekiel 27:23). Another, in Coelosyria, near Damascus (Amos 1:5). The primitive Eden was somewhere in the locality containing the conjoined Euphrates and the Tigris (or Hiddekel) which branch off northward into those two rivers, and southward branch into two channels again below Bassera, before failing into the sea, Gihon the E. channel, and Pison the W. Havilah, near the W. channel, would thus be N.E. Arabia; and Cush (or Ethiopia), near the E. channel, would be Kissia, Chuzestan, or Susiana. The united rivers are called the Shat-el-Arab. Eden, was but a temporary nursery for the human family: from there people, if they had remained innocent, would have spread out in every direction until the whole earth became "the garden of the Lord."

God's purpose, though deferred, will, in His own time, be realized by the Second Adam, the Lord Jesus from heaven. The rivers are named as they were after the flood, which must have altered the face of the ancient Eden. The four took their rise in it, as their center, which is not true of the present Tigris ("arrow") and Euphrates ("the good and fertile".) Armenia's highlands are the traditional cradle of the race; thence probably, from Eden as their source, flowed the two eastern rivers, Tigris and Euphrates, and the two western ones through the regions answering to Arabia and Egypt. Man was to dress and keep the garden, for without human culture, grain and other plants will degenerate. As nature was made for man, his calling was to ennoble it, and to make paradise, which though so lovely, was susceptible of development, a transparent mirror of the Creator's glory.

It was designed also as the scene of man's own spiritual development by its two trees, of life and of knowledge. Here also the "beasts of the field," i.e. that live on its produce (game and tame cattle, as distinguished from "beasts of the earth"), were brought to him to develop that intellect which constitutes his lordship and superiority to the brutes. His inner thought in observing their natures found expression in names appropriate. The Paradise regained can never be lost by those who overcome through the Lord Jesus (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:14). The traditions of almost all nations have preserved the truth, in some form, that there was an original abode of man's innocence; the Greek and Latin garden of the Hesperides; the Hindu golden Mount Meru; the Chinese enchanted gardens; the Medo-Persian Ormuzd's mountain Albordj (compare Ezekiel 28:13; Joel 2:3).

The Hindus' tradition tells of a "first age of the world when justice, in the form of a bull, kept herself firm on her four feet, virtue reigned, man free from disease saw all his wishes accomplished, and attained an age of 400 years." In the Teutonic Edda, Fab. 7, etc., corruption is represented as suddenly produced by strange women's blandishments who deprived men of their pristine integrity. In the Tibetan, Mongolian, and Singhalese traditions, a covetous temper works the sad change. The Babylonians, Egyptians, and Chinese had the tradition of man's life once reaching thousands of years. The Greeks and Romans made it from 800 to 1,000 years.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beth-Eden
BETH-EDEN ( Amos 1:5 marg.). See Eden [House of].

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Garden of Eden
(Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates.

Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Eden
Genesis 2:15 (c) Here is a type of the condition of bliss and blessing that is the portion of the consecrated, trusting Christian in this life and of the eternal richness of the next life.

Webster's Dictionary - Eden
(n.) The garden where Adam and Eve first dwelt; hence, a delightful region or residence.

King James Dictionary - Eden
E'DEN, n. Heb. pleasure, delight. The country and garden in which Adam and Eve were placed by God himself.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Eden, Garden of
(Genesis 2) Home of Adam and Eve, located by tradition in the valley of the Euphrates.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Eden
The garden of our first parents. Eden, means delights. (Genesis 2:8)

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Eden
Eden (ç'den), pleasantness. 1. The home of Adam and Eve before their fell. Genesis 2:15. Its site has not been fixed. Two of its rivers are identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel or Tigris; the others are disputed. Some say Gihon was the Kile and Pison the Indus. The best authorities agree that the "garden of Eden eastward" was somewhere in the highlands of Armenia, or in the valley of the Euphrates, but its precise location cannot be determined. The Bible begins with a beautiful picture of Eden, the paradise of innocence on earth, and closes with an equally beautiful picture of the more glorious paradise of the future, with its river of life and tree of life. Revelation 22:2. 2. A region conquered by the Assyrians, 2 Kings 19:12; Isaiah 37:12; probably in Mesopotamia, near modern Balis, and same as the Eden of Ezekiel 27:23. 3. The house of Eden. Amos 1:5. See Beth-eden.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Eden
Garden of, the residence of our first parents in their state of purity and blessedness. The word Eden in the Hebrew denotes "pleasure" or "delight:" whence the name has been given to several places which, from their situation, were pleasant or delightful. Thus the Prophet Amos 1:5 , speaks of an Eden in Syria, which is generally considered to have been in the valley of Damascus, where a town called Eden is mentioned by Pliny and Ptolemy, and where the tomb of Abel is pretended to be shown. This has in consequence been selected by some as the site of the garden of Eden. By others, the garden has been placed on the eastern side of mount Libanus; and by others again, in Arabia Felix, where traces of the word Eden are found. But the opinion which has been most generally received on this subject is that which places the garden on the Lower Euphrates; between the junction of that river with the Tigris and the gulf of Persia. This is Dr. Well's opinion; in which he is supported by Huetius, Grotius, Marinus, and Bochart. To this it is replied, that, according to this scheme, the garden was intersected by a great branch of the Euphrates, in the lower and broadest part of its course; which will give it an extent absolutely irreconcilable with the idea of Adam's "dressing" it by his own manual labour, or even of overlooking it: beside that all communication would be cut off between its different parts by a stream half a mile in width. Its local features, too, if in this situation, must have been of the most uninteresting kind; the whole of that region, as far as the sight can reach, being a dead, monotonous, sandy, or marshy flat, without a single undulation to relieve the eye, or give any of the beauties which the imagination involuntarily paints to itself as attendant on a spot finished by the hand of God as the residence of his creatures in a state of innocence; whose minds may be supposed to be tuned to the full enjoyment of the grand and beautiful in nature. How different will be the aspect and arrangement of this favoured spot, if it be placed where only, according to the words of Moses, it can be placed; namely, at the heads or fountains of the rivers described, instead of their mouths.

The country of Eden, therefore, according to others, was some where in Media, Armenia, or the north of Mesopotamia; all mountainous tracts, and affording, instead of the sickening plains of Babylonia, some of the grandest, as well as the richest scenery in the world. A river or stream rising in some part of this country, entered the garden; where it was parted into four others, in all probability, by first falling into a basin or lake, from which the other streams issued at different points, taking different directions, and growing into mighty rivers; although at their sources in the garden, they would be like all other rivers, mere brooks, and forming no barrier to a free communication between the parts of the garden. Dr. Wells, in order to support his hypothesis of the situation of Eden on the lower parts of the Euphrates and Tigris, after giving these rivers a distribution which has now no existence, makes the Pison and Gihon to be parts of the Tigris and Euphrates themselves: an arrangement at perfect disagreement with the particular description of Moses; beside, that the Gihon thus called, instead of compassing the whole land of Cush, can only be said to skirt an extreme corner of it. It appears, indeed, that in the time of Alexander, the Euphrates pursued a separate course to the sea; or, at least, that a navigable branch of it was carried in that direction: in the mouth of which, at Diridotis, Nearchus anchored with his fleet. But what reliance can be placed on the ever shifting channels of a river flowing through an alluvial soil, and over a perfect level divertible at the pleasure of the people inhabiting its banks? Or, what theory can be founded on their distribution, which will not be as unstable as the streams them selves? This very channel, so essential to the hypothesis which places Eden in this situation, was annihilated by the Orcheni, a neighbouring people; who directed the stream to water their own land, and thus gave it a shorter course into the Tigris, which it has ever since preserved. But it is only the lower parts of the Euphrates and Tigris, as they creep through the plains of Babylonia, which are thus inconstant: higher up in their courses, they flow over more solid strata, and in deeper valleys, unchanged by time. It is here that their conformity with the Mosaic account is to be sought; and it is here that they may be found, in the exact condition in which they were left by the deluge, and, indeed, according to Moses, in which they existed before that event. It is true, that the heads of the four rivers, above described, cannot now be found sufficiently near, to recognize thence the exact situation of paradise; but they all arise from the same mountainous region; and the springs of the Euphrates and Tigris, as already mentioned, are even now nearly interwoven. Mr. Faber supposes the lake Arsissa to cover the site of Eden; and that the change which carried the heads of the rivers to a greater distance from it, was occasioned by the deluge. But it is far more probable that this change, if we may infer from the account given by Moses that the courses of all the streams remained unaltered by the flood, may have taken place at man's expulsion from the garden: when God might choose to obliterate this fair portion of his works, unfitted for any thing but the residence of innocence; and to blot at once from the face of the earth, like the guilty cities of the plain, both the site and the memorial of man's transgression,—an awful event, which would add tenfold horrors to the punishment.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Eden
The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. In it God made to grow every tree that was pleasant to the sight and good for food: in it also was the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Genesis 2:8-15 . A fruitful place is described as being like the garden of Eden. Isaiah 51:3 ; Ezekiel 36:35 ; Joel 2:3 . The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. Isaiah 51:3 ; Ezekiel 28:13 ; Ezekiel 31:9,16,18 . The trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. Deuteronomy 32:8 . Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life. Genesis 3:23,24 .

A river ran out of Eden to water it, and then divided into four. Only two of these can be identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel denoting the Tigris. There are no others to be found to make up the four, and all efforts to find out where the garden of Eden was situated have utterly failed. It belonged to the time of innocence, and as that has gone, the earthly paradise has long ceased to exist. See PARADISE.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eden
A province in Asia, in which was Paradise. "The Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had formed," Genesis 2:8 . The topography of Eden is thus described: "And a river went out of Eden to water the garden, and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. The name of the first is Pison," etc.

This obscure passage has received many different explanations and applications, none of which are fully satisfactory; and now it is impossible to say with certainty where Eden lay. Most writers have sought for it in some elevated and central region, the heights of which would give rise to various rivers flowing off in different directions through lower grounds to their outlets. Such a region exists in the high lands of Armenia, west of Mount Ararat and 5,000 feet above the sea. Here, within a circle but a few miles in diameter, four large rivers rise: the Euphrates, and Tigris, or Hiddekel, flowing south into the Persian Gulf; the Araxes, flowing northeast into the Caspian Sea; and the Phasis, or the Halys, flowing northwest into the Black Sea. This fourth river may have been the Pishon of Eden; and the Araxes may well be the Gihon, since both words mean the same, and describe its dart-like swiftness. This elevated country, still beautiful and fertile, may have been the land of Eden; and in its choicest portion, towards the east, the garden may once have smiled.

Another location of Eden is now preferred by many interpreters-near the spot where the Euphrates and Tigris from a junction after their long wanderings, a hundred and twenty miles north of the Persian gulf, and where the river Ulai flows in from the northeast. This region may have been greatly changed by the lapse of many thousand years, and may now bear little resemblance to the luxuriant and beautiful plain of primeval times. Yet long after the flood the plain of Shinar in the same region attracted the admiration of the sons of Cush, Genesis 10:8-10 ; 11:2 . As two of the rivers of Eden bear the familiar names of the Euphrates and Tigris, it seems probable that it was in one or the other of the regions above named. Wherever it was, it is there no more since the fall and the curse. The first chapters of the Bible show Paradise withdrawn from man's view, and no pilgrimage can discover it upon earth. The last chapters of the Bible restore to our view a more glorious and enduring Paradise: "Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life."

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Eden
EDEN . 2 Chronicles 29:12 ; 2 Chronicles 31:15 , a Levite, or possibly two. It is not certain that Eden is the true form of the name: LXX [Note: Septuagint.] has Jodan in the first, Odom in the second passage. When it transliterates Eden elsewhere it is usually in the form Edem .

J. Taylor.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Eden, Children of
EDEN, CHILDREN OF . The people occupying Bit-Adini ( 2 Kings 19:12 , Isaiah 37:12 : for Ezekiel 27:23 see Canneh). See Eden [House of]. Telassar ( 2 Kings 19:12 ) may perhaps be Til Bashir of the inscriptions.

J. Taylor.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Eden, Garden of
EDEN, GARDEN OF . Genesis 2:1-25 f. relates how God planted a garden in the East, in Eden. A river rose in that land, flowed through the garden, and then divided into four streams. Within the enclosure were many trees useful for food; also the tree of life, whose fruit conferred immortality, and the tree of knowledge, which gave power to discriminate between things profitable and things hurtful, or, between right and wrong. The animal denizens were innocuous to man and to each other. When the first man and woman yielded to the tempter and ate of the tree of knowledge, they were expelled, and precluded from re-entering the garden.

In this account Genesis 2:10-14 ; Genesis 3:22 ; Genesis 3:24 seem to be interpolations. But the topographical data in Genesis 2:10-14 are of especial importance, because they have supplied the material for countless attempts to locate the garden. It has been almost universally agreed that one of the four rivers is the Euphrates and another the Tigris . Here the agreement ends, and no useful purpose would be served by an attempt to enumerate the conflicting theories. Three which have found favour of late, may be briefly mentioned. One is that the Gihon is the Nile, and the Pishon the Persian and Arabian Gulfs, conceived of as a great river, with its source and that of the Nile not far from those of the Euphrates and the Tigris. Another regards Eden as an island not far from the head of the Persian Gulf. near the mouths of the Euphrates, the Tigris. the Kerkha. and the Karun. The third puts Eden near Erldu (once the seaport of Chaldæa on the Persian Gulf), and takes the Pishon to be the canal afterwards called Pallakottas, and the Gihon to be the Khoaspes (now Kerkha). In support of the last-named view a cuneiform tablet is quoted which speaks of a tree or shrub planted near Eridu by the gods. The sun-god and ‘the peerless mother of Tammuz’ dwell there: ‘no man enters into the midst of it.’ But the correspondences with the Biblical Eden are not sufficiently striking to compel conviction. At the same time it can hardly be doubted that the Biblical writer utilized traditional matter which came originally from Babylonia. The very name Eden , which to him meant ‘delight,’ is almost certainly the Bab. [Note: Babylonian.] çdinnu = ‘plain.’ The Bab. [Note: Babylonian.] author would conceive of the garden as lying in a district near his own land, hard by the supposed common source of the great rivers. And this, to the Hebrews, is in the East.

Eden, or the garden of Eden, became the symbol of a very fertile land (Genesis 13:10 , Isaiah 51:3 , Ezekiel 31:9 ; Ezekiel 31:16 ; Ezekiel 31:18 , Joel 2:3 ). The dirge over the king of Tyre ( Ezekiel 28:13 ff.) is founded on a Paradise legend which resembles that in Gn., but has a stronger mythological colouring: the ‘garden of God’ ( Ezekiel 28:13 ) is apparently identified with the well-known mythical mountain of the gods ( Ezekiel 28:14 ); the cherub and the king of Tyre are assimilated to each other; the stones of fire may be compared with the flame of a sword ( Genesis 3:24 : see also Enoch 24.16). In later literature we find much expansion and embellishment of the theme: see Jubilees 3:9, 4:26, Enoch 24f., 32, 60, 61, 2Es 8:52 , Assump. Mos. ix ff., Ev. Nic. xix. etc. NT thought and imagery have been affected by the description of Eden given in Genesis 2:1-25 f.: see Luke 23:43 , 2 Corinthians 12:4 , Revelation 2:7 . The Koran has many references to the garden of Paradise Lost, and the gardens of the Paradise to come (ix, xiii, xlvii, lv, lxviii, etc.).

J. Taylor.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Eden, House of
EDEN, HOUSE OF . A place or district connected politically with Damascus ( Amos 1:5 RVm [Note: Revised Version margin.] Beth-eden ). Of the five suggestions for locality the likeliest is ‘Eden or Ehden , 20 miles N.W. of Baalbek, on the N.W. slope of Lebanon. Its most formidable competitor, Bit-Adini , a district on either bank of the Middle Euphrates, frequently mentioned in the cuneiform inscriptions, is too far 200 miles from Damascus, and in the days of Amos had long been subject to Assyria.

J. Taylor.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Eden
Pleasure; delight
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Eden
The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. In it God made to grow every tree that was pleasant to the sight and good for food: in it also was the tree of life and the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Genesis 2:8-15 . A fruitful place is described as being like the garden of Eden. Isaiah 51:3 ; Ezekiel 36:35 ; Joel 2:3 . The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. Isaiah 51:3 ; Ezekiel 28:13 ; Ezekiel 31:9,16,18 . The trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. Deuteronomy 32:8 . Adam was put in the garden to dress and to keep it; but on his fall he was driven out and cherubim were placed to keep the way of the tree of life. Genesis 3:23,24 .

A river ran out of Eden to water it, and then divided into four. Only two of these can be identified, the Euphrates, and the Hiddekel denoting the Tigris. There are no others to be found to make up the four, and all efforts to find out where the garden of Eden was situated have utterly failed. It belonged to the time of innocence, and as that has gone, the earthly paradise has long ceased to exist. See PARADISE.

Sentence search

Beth-Eden - BETH-Eden ( Amos 1:5 marg. See Eden [House of]
Canneh - A town named with Haran and Eden ( Ezekiel 27:23 ), not identified. bĕnê Eden , ‘sons of Eden’ (see Guthe, Bibelwörterbuch, s
Eden - Eden . It is not certain that Eden is the true form of the name: LXX [Note: Septuagint. When it transliterates Eden elsewhere it is usually in the form Edem
Eden - Eden (ç'den), pleasantness. The best authorities agree that the "garden of Eden eastward" was somewhere in the highlands of Armenia, or in the valley of the Euphrates, but its precise location cannot be determined. The Bible begins with a beautiful picture of Eden, the paradise of innocence on earth, and closes with an equally beautiful picture of the more glorious paradise of the future, with its river of life and tree of life. A region conquered by the Assyrians, 2 Kings 19:12; Isaiah 37:12; probably in Mesopotamia, near modern Balis, and same as the Eden of Ezekiel 27:23. The house of Eden. See Beth-Eden
Eden - “Eden” is probably derived from the Sumerian-Akkadian edinu, meaning “flatland” or “wilderness. ” The similarity to the Hebrew verb adan , meaning “delight” or “pleasure,” resulted in the Septuagint's translation of the expression “garden of Eden” as “garden of delight,” hence paradise. ... “Eden” appears twenty times in the Old Testament but never in the New Testament. Ezekiel 27:23 mentions a region named Eden located on the Euphrates. Amos 1:5 refers to the ruler of Damascus as holding the scepter of the house of Eden. Though details seem precise, identification of the rivers which flow from the river issuing forth from Eden cannot be accomplished with certainty. ... Joel 2:3 compares Judah's condition before its destruction with Eden. In Isaiah 51:3 and Ezekiel 36:35 , Eden is used as an illustration of the great prosperity God would bestow on Judah. These exilic prophets promised that the nation God restored after the Exile would be like Eden's garden. Ezekiel also refers to the trees of Eden (Ezekiel 31:9 ,Ezekiel 31:9,31:16 ,Ezekiel 31:16,31:18 ) and calls Eden the garden of God (Ezekiel 28:13 )
Beth-Eden - ” Amos announced God's threat to take the royal house out of Beth-Eden or the “house of Eden” (KJV) (Amos 1:5 ). An Assyrian representative bragged about conquering Beth-Eden, urging Hezekiah to surrender about 701 B. Ezekiel included Eden as one of the states who had traded with Tyre (Ezekiel 27:23 )
pi'Son - [Eden ]
Hiddekel - See Eden
Eden, Children of - Eden, CHILDREN OF . See Eden [House of]
Eden, House of - Eden, HOUSE OF . ] Beth-Eden ). Of the five suggestions for locality the likeliest is ‘Eden or Ehden , 20 miles N
Pishon - See Eden [Garden of]
e'Den - The description of Eden is found in ( Genesis 2:8-14 ) In the eastern portion of the region of Eden was the garden planted. With regard to the Pison and Gihon a great variety of opinion exists, but the best authorities are divided between (1) Eden as in northeast Arabia, at the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, and their separation again, making the four rivers of the different channels of these two, or (2), and most probably, Eden as situated in Armenia, near the origin of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, and in which same region rise the Araxes (Pison of Genesis) and the Oxus ( Gihon ). In (2 Kings 19:12 ) and Isai 37:12 "The sons of Eden" are mentioned with Gozan, Haran and Rezeph as victims of the Assyrian greed of conquest. Probability seems to point to the northwest of Mesopotamia as the locality of Eden. ... BETH-Eden, "house of pleasure:" probably the name of a country residence of the kings of Damascus
e'Den - The description of Eden is found in ( Genesis 2:8-14 ) In the eastern portion of the region of Eden was the garden planted. With regard to the Pison and Gihon a great variety of opinion exists, but the best authorities are divided between (1) Eden as in northeast Arabia, at the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, and their separation again, making the four rivers of the different channels of these two, or (2), and most probably, Eden as situated in Armenia, near the origin of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, and in which same region rise the Araxes (Pison of Genesis) and the Oxus ( Gihon ). In (2 Kings 19:12 ) and Isai 37:12 "The sons of Eden" are mentioned with Gozan, Haran and Rezeph as victims of the Assyrian greed of conquest. Probability seems to point to the northwest of Mesopotamia as the locality of Eden. ... BETH-Eden, "house of pleasure:" probably the name of a country residence of the kings of Damascus
Edenic - ) Of or pertaining to Eden; paradisaic
Nod - of Eden
Eden - Eden, means delights
Gan eden - the Garden of Eden): the spiritual realm of souls in the afterlife
Pison - One of the four heads of Eden's river (Genesis 2:11), compassing Havilah. (See Eden
Eden - The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. A fruitful place is described as being like the garden of Eden. The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. The trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. ... A river ran out of Eden to water it, and then divided into four. There are no others to be found to make up the four, and all efforts to find out where the garden of Eden was situated have utterly failed
Eden - The garden of Eden (that is 'delights'), in which dwelt Adam and Eve for the short time before they sinned. A fruitful place is described as being like the garden of Eden. The fall of Pharaoh, under the figure of an exalted tree, is said to comfort the trees of Eden, which is called the 'garden of God,' etc. The trees of Eden having been planted by God, they are in this last passage used as a symbol for the various nations placed by God in the earth, Israel being the centre. ... A river ran out of Eden to water it, and then divided into four. There are no others to be found to make up the four, and all efforts to find out where the garden of Eden was situated have utterly failed
Nod - All that we are told of it is, that it was "on the east of Eden," or, as it may be rendered, "before Eden;" which very country of Eden is no sure guide for us, as the situation of that also is disputed. But, be it on the higher or lower Euphrates, ( see Eden, ) the land of Nod which stood before it with respect to the place where Moses wrote, may still preserve the curse of barrenness passed on it for Cain's sake, namely, in the deserts of Syria or Arabia
Par'Adise - This is a word of Persian origin, and is used in the Septuagint as the translation of Eden. It is applied figuratively to the celestial dwelling of the righteous, in allusion to the garden of Eden
Nod - Wandering, a region east of Eden so named on account of wanderings in it of the exiled Cain, Genesis 4:16
Paradise - (See Eden. Compare the Holy Land turned from a garden of Eden into a wilderness, with Israel's wilderness made like Eden the garden of Jehovah (Numbers 24:6; Joel 2:3; Isaiah 51:3; Ezekiel 36:35; contrast Ezekiel 28:13). In Eden Adam and Eve lived solitary, exhibiting the perfection of the individual. But the coming city shall combine all that was excellent of the first Eden, with the perfect polity that rests on Christ the chief corner stone, in which symmetry, grace, power, and the beauty of holiness shall shine for ever
Pison - One of the four 'heads' or main streams into which the river divided that flowed through Eden
Pison - One of the four great rivers which watered Eden
Hiddekel - One of the rivers of Eden: supposed to be identical with the Tigris, which is called Dijlah
Eden - "The Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had formed," Genesis 2:8 . The topography of Eden is thus described: "And a river went out of Eden to water the garden, and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. ... This obscure passage has received many different explanations and applications, none of which are fully satisfactory; and now it is impossible to say with certainty where Eden lay. This fourth river may have been the Pishon of Eden; and the Araxes may well be the Gihon, since both words mean the same, and describe its dart-like swiftness. This elevated country, still beautiful and fertile, may have been the land of Eden; and in its choicest portion, towards the east, the garden may once have smiled. ... Another location of Eden is now preferred by many interpreters-near the spot where the Euphrates and Tigris from a junction after their long wanderings, a hundred and twenty miles north of the Persian gulf, and where the river Ulai flows in from the northeast. As two of the rivers of Eden bear the familiar names of the Euphrates and Tigris, it seems probable that it was in one or the other of the regions above named
gi'Hon - (Genesis 2:13 ) [Eden ] ... A place near Jerusalem, memorable as the scene of the anointing and proclamation of Solomon as king
Eden, Garden of - Eden, GARDEN OF . relates how God planted a garden in the East, in Eden. Another regards Eden as an island not far from the head of the Persian Gulf. The third puts Eden near Erldu (once the seaport of Chaldæa on the Persian Gulf), and takes the Pishon to be the canal afterwards called Pallakottas, and the Gihon to be the Khoaspes (now Kerkha). ’ But the correspondences with the Biblical Eden are not sufficiently striking to compel conviction. The very name Eden , which to him meant ‘delight,’ is almost certainly the Bab. ... Eden, or the garden of Eden, became the symbol of a very fertile land (Genesis 13:10 , Isaiah 51:3 , Ezekiel 31:9 ; Ezekiel 31:16 ; Ezekiel 31:18 , Joel 2:3 ). NT thought and imagery have been affected by the description of Eden given in Genesis 2:1-25 f
Nod - The region eastward of Eden, to which Cain fled from the presence of Jehovah
Tabrets - no sooner wast thou created than, like Adam, thou wast surrounded with tabrets, the emblem of Eden-like joys (Ezekiel 28:13)
Eran - ” Some of the earliest translations and the Samaritan Pentateuch read “Eden” rather than Eran
Paradise - ... The Septuagint uses the word Paradise when speaking of the Garden of Eden, in which the Lord placed Adam and Eve. See Eden. ... In the New Testament, "paradise" is put, in allusion to the paradise of Eden, for the place where the souls of the blessed enjoy happiness
Pishon - (pi' sshahn) Name meaning, “free-flowing,” designating one of the rivers of Eden (Genesis 2:11 )
Hiddekel - One of the rivers of Eden, the river which "goeth eastward to Assyria," Genesis 2:14, and which Daniel calls "the great river," Daniel 10:4, rightly identified with the Tigris
Adam - They were placed in the Garden of Eden, but were banished from there after eating from the forbidden Tree of Knowledge
Paradise - " The LXX, or Greek translators of the Old Testament, make use of the word paradise, when they speak of the garden of Eden, which Jehovah planted at the creation, and in which he placed our first parents. See Eden
Pison - It has, of course, been placed as variously as the Garden of Eden, to which article and EUPHRATES the reader is referred
Garden, Gardener - Water was always necessary: in the garden of Eden there was a river by which it was watered; and hence a fruitful place was described as well watered, 'as the garden of the Lord. ... The two most noted gardens in scripture were the gardens of Eden and of GETHSEMANE, q. Genesis 3:19 ; Song of Solomon 1:6 ; and in Eden, before the curse, Adam was placed in the garden 'to dress it and to keep it
Dunkeld, Scotland, Diocese of - Comprises the counties of Angus, Clackmannan, northern part of Fife (left bank of the Eden), Kinross, and Perth; suffragan of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh; established, c1115 A portion of the ancient cathedral at Dunkeld is used by the Presbyterians
Nod - It was on the east of Eden, but is not identified
Havilah - The location of one Havilah is connected with that of the Garden of Eden. See Eden
Telas'Ear - (Assyrian hill ) is mentioned in ( 2 Kings 19:12 ) and in Isai 37:12 As a city inhabited by "the children of Eden," --which had been conquered and was held in the time of Sennacherib, by the Assyrians
Tree of the Knowledge of Good And Evil - Stood in the midst of the garden of Eden, beside the tree of life (Genesis 23,3 )
Hiddekel - (hihd' dih kehl) Hebrew name for the third river flowing from the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:14 )
Tellssar - "Hill (or sanctuary) of Asshur"; a place wrested from the children of Eden by Assyria
Fall, the - The fall is that event in the Garden of Eden where Adam and Eve disobeyed the command of God and ate of The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil (Genesis 2:1-25; Gen 3:1-24)
Gihon - The name of a river of Eden, Genesis 2:13
Paradise - The LXX, adopting this word for the garden of Eden, which signifies 'delights,' accounts for Eden being often called paradise, and may account for the use of the word in the N
Nod - The addition’ eastward of Eden’ is of little help for its location
Paradise - The Garden of Eden was considered a paradise
Briers - It shows how abundant are the fruits of the curse pronounced in Eden because of the sin of man, but which will be removed in the millennium, when the myrtle, etc
Paradise - The word was used of the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:8-10; Ezekiel 28:13)
Nod - Nod is located “away from the presence of the Lord and “east of Eden” (Genesis 4:16 )
Paradise - The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed immediately after their creation
Hid'Dekel - (rapid ), one of the rivers of Eden, the river which "goeth eastward to Assyria," ( Genesis 2:14 ) and which Daniel calls "the great river," (Daniel 10:4 ) seems to have been rightly identified by the LXX
Eden - The word Eden in the Hebrew denotes "pleasure" or "delight:" whence the name has been given to several places which, from their situation, were pleasant or delightful. Thus the Prophet Amos 1:5 , speaks of an Eden in Syria, which is generally considered to have been in the valley of Damascus, where a town called Eden is mentioned by Pliny and Ptolemy, and where the tomb of Abel is pretended to be shown. This has in consequence been selected by some as the site of the garden of Eden. By others, the garden has been placed on the eastern side of mount Libanus; and by others again, in Arabia Felix, where traces of the word Eden are found. ... The country of Eden, therefore, according to others, was some where in Media, Armenia, or the north of Mesopotamia; all mountainous tracts, and affording, instead of the sickening plains of Babylonia, some of the grandest, as well as the richest scenery in the world. Wells, in order to support his hypothesis of the situation of Eden on the lower parts of the Euphrates and Tigris, after giving these rivers a distribution which has now no existence, makes the Pison and Gihon to be parts of the Tigris and Euphrates themselves: an arrangement at perfect disagreement with the particular description of Moses; beside, that the Gihon thus called, instead of compassing the whole land of Cush, can only be said to skirt an extreme corner of it. But what reliance can be placed on the ever shifting channels of a river flowing through an alluvial soil, and over a perfect level divertible at the pleasure of the people inhabiting its banks? Or, what theory can be founded on their distribution, which will not be as unstable as the streams them selves? This very channel, so essential to the hypothesis which places Eden in this situation, was annihilated by the Orcheni, a neighbouring people; who directed the stream to water their own land, and thus gave it a shorter course into the Tigris, which it has ever since preserved. Faber supposes the lake Arsissa to cover the site of Eden; and that the change which carried the heads of the rivers to a greater distance from it, was occasioned by the deluge
Eden - Mesopotamia an Eden is mentioned near the Tigris (2 Kings 19:12; Isaiah 37:12; Ezekiel 27:23). The primitive Eden was somewhere in the locality containing the conjoined Euphrates and the Tigris (or Hiddekel) which branch off northward into those two rivers, and southward branch into two channels again below Bassera, before failing into the sea, Gihon the E. Eden, was but a temporary nursery for the human family: from there people, if they had remained innocent, would have spread out in every direction until the whole earth became "the garden of the Lord. The rivers are named as they were after the flood, which must have altered the face of the ancient Eden. ) Armenia's highlands are the traditional cradle of the race; thence probably, from Eden as their source, flowed the two eastern rivers, Tigris and Euphrates, and the two western ones through the regions answering to Arabia and Egypt
Gihon - See Eden [Garden of]
Carbuncle - (cahr' buhn cle) A precious stone used in the priest's breastpiece (Exodus 28:17 ) and part of the king of Tyre's apparel in the Garden of Eden according to Ezekiel's ironic description (Ezekiel 28:13 )
Paradise - ) The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed after their creation
Cain - In a fit of jealousy, roused by the rejection of his own sacrifice and the acceptance of Abel's, he committed the crime of murder, for which he was expelled from Eden, and led the life of an exile
Gihon - ( See Eden
Cain - In a fit of jealousy, roused by the rejection of his own sacrifice and the acceptance of Abel's, he committed the crime of murder, for which he was expelled from Eden, and led the life of an exile
jo'ah - ) ... A Gershonite, the son of Zeimmah and father of Eden
Tree of Knowledge - Plant in midst of Garden of Eden used to prove the first couple's loyalty to the Creator (Genesis 2-3 ). See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Life
Tree of Life - Stood also in the midst of the garden of Eden (Genesis 2:9 ; 3:22 )
Havilah - The river Pison (see Eden [Garden of]) is said to compass the land of Havilah ( Genesis 2:11-12 ), and it formed one of the limits of the region occupied by the sons of Ishmael ( Genesis 25:18 ) in which also Saul smote the Amalekites ( 1 Samuel 15:8 )
Serpent - The tempter appeared in that form to our first parents in Eden
Cain - He withdrew into the land of Nod, east of Eden, and built a city that he named Enoch, after one of his sons
Paradise - translators used it of the garden of Eden, Genesis 2:8 , and in other respects, e. The same region is mentioned in Revelation 2:7 , where the "tree of life," the figurative antitype of that in Eden, held out to the overcomer, is spoken of as being in "the Paradise of God" (RV), marg
Cherub/Cherubim - They were put in Eden "to guard the way of the tree of life," (Genesis 3:24)
Gihon - One of the rivers in the garden of Eden, now quite unknown
Gihon -
One of the four rivers of Eden (Genesis 2:13 ). But as, according to the sacred narrative, all these rivers of Eden took their origin from the head-waters of the Euphrates and the Trigris, it is probable that the Gihon is the ancient Araxes, which, under the modern name of the Arras, discharges itself into the Caspian Sea. (See Eden
Tree of Life - Plant in Garden of Eden symbolizing access to eternal life and metaphor used in Proverbs. See Adam and Eve ; Eden ; Tree of Knowledge
Paradise - The Greek Old Testament (Septuagint used “paradise” to translate the Hebrew words for the Garden of Eden in Genesis 2-3
Eden - 31 degrees, which is a very rich and fertile tract, has been by the most competent authorities agreed on as the probable site of Eden. " Among almost all nations there are traditions of the primitive innocence of our race in the garden of Eden
Gihon - ” The primary water supply for Jerusalem and one of the four rivers into which the river of Eden divided (Genesis 2:13 ). See Eden ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Kidron Valley ; Siloam ; Water
River - We read of the several rivers in Scripture, even from the garden of Eden
Jasper, - ' It had a place in the high priest's breastplate, and was one of the stones in the covering of the symbolical king of Tyrus in Eden
Gihon - See Eden , and EUPHRATES
Paradise - While the word pardçs occurs only 3 times in the OT ( Song of Solomon 4:12 , Ecclesiastes 2:5 , Nehemiah 2:3 ), and then with no reference to the Garden of Eden , it is unquestionable that Eden serves as the basis for the later conception. These, undoubtedly, are also to be seen in the Genesis picture of Eden
Jabal - Adam "dressed and kept" the garden of Eden, and his sons must have learned from him some of his knowledge
Dayspring - An old English expression denoting the dawn (‘the day sprynge or dawnynge of the daye gyveth a certeyne lyght before the rysinge of the sonne,’ Eden, Decades , 1555, p
Adam - God made him in His own image, and placed him in the Garden of Eden
Kirharaseth - Such was our nature originally, like the garden of Eden; and who but must lament to behold the ruin by the fall
Saint Andrews And Edinburgh, Scotland, Archdiocese - Comprises the counties of Berwick, the southern part of Fife (on right bank of the Eden), Linlithgow, Midlothian, Peebles, Roxburgh, Selkirk, Stirling (except Baldernock), and West Lothian
ad'am - The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [ Eden ] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named
ad'am - The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [ Eden ] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named
ad'am - The man Adam was placed in a garden which the Lord God had planted "eastward in Eden," for the purpose of dressing it and keeping it. [ Eden ] Adam was permitted to eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, which was called ("the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," because it was the test of Adam's obedience. " While Adam was in the garden of Eden, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air were brought to him to be named
Telassar - This city is mentioned with Gozan, Haran, and Rezeph, and is spoken of as a place inhabited by ‘the children of Eden’ ( 2 Kings 19:12 , Isaiah 37:12 )
Gardens - Mentioned in Scripture, of Eden (Genesis 2:8,9 ); Ahab's garden of herbs (1 Kings 21:2 ); the royal garden (2 Kings 21:18 ); the royal garden at Susa (Esther 1:5 ); the garden of Joseph of Arimathea (John 19:41 ); of Gethsemane (John 18:1 )
Cain - For this crime he was expelled from Eden, and henceforth led the life of an exile, bearing upon him some mark which God had set upon him in answer to his own cry for mercy, so that thereby he might be protected from the wrath of his fellow-men; or it may be that God only gave him some sign to assure him that he would not be slain (Genesis 4:15 ). , the land of "exile", which is said to have been in the "east of Eden," and there he built a city, the first we read of, and called it after his son's name, Enoch
Tigris - also Eden [Garden of]
Enoch -
The eldest son of Cain (Genesis 4:17 ), who built a city east of Eden in the land of Nod, and called it "after the name of his son Enoch
There - The Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom he had formed
Garden - ’ It has thus become a symbol of Heaven, and supplies a common term of immortal hope to the three great monotheistic religions, inasmuch as the Christian ‘Paradise’ is the equivalent of the Jewish Gan-Eden, ‘Garden of Eden,’ and the Moslem il-Gannat, ‘the Garden
Plant - 2:8: “And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden
Paradise - The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed
Cherub, Cherubim - They were placed at Eden to keep the tree of life after the fall of man
Cherub - They are first mentioned in connection with the expulsion of our first parents from Eden (Genesis 3:24 ). ... Their office was, (1) on the expulsion of our first parents from Eden, to prevent all access to the tree of life; and (2) to form the throne and chariot of Jehovah in his manifestation of himself on earth
Abana, And Pharpar - As these rivers of Damascus were never dry, but made the region they watered like the Garden of Eden for fertility and beauty, Naaman might well contrast them with most of "the waters of Israel," which dry up under the summer sun
Havilah - The river from Eden is described as flowing “around the whole land of Havilah” (Genesis 2:11 NAS), a land noted for gold and other precious stones
ti'Gris - It appears, indeed, under the name of Hiddekel, among the rivers of Eden, ( Genesis 2:14 ) and is there correctly described as "running eastward to Assyria;" but after this we hear no more of it, if we accept one doubtful allusion in Nahum (Nahum 2:6 ) until the captivity, when it becomes well known to the prophet Daniel
Man - The first man, Adam, was made in God's image (Genesis 1:2627), and placed in the Garden of Eden for the purpose of enjoying the fellowship of the Lord and fulfilling the purpose of God's creation
Cush - See Eden
Seat - The seat of Eden has never been incontrovertibly ascertained
Onyx - Tyre's king, like the high priest with his precious stones, was the type of humanity in its unfallen perfection in Eden; antichrist will usurp the divine King Priest's office (Zechariah 6:13; compare Acts 12:21-23)
Fig, Fig-Tree - It was one of the trees in the garden of Eden, of the leaves of which Adam and Eve made aprons
River; Wadi - In its first biblical appearance nâhâr represents the primeval “rivers” of Eden: “And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads” (Gen. …” This may be an allusion to the primeval “river” in Eden whose water gave life to the garden
Adam - He was placed after his creation in the Garden of Eden, to cultivate it, and to enjoy its fruits under this one prohibition: "Of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. They were expelled from Eden, and at the east of the garden God placed a flame, which turned every way, to prevent access to the tree of life (Genesis 3 )
Euphrates - In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12
Mesopotamia - Eden was not far off; Ararat was near to it on the north, and the land of Shinar on the south
Cherubim - ... After the rebellion against God in the garden of Eden, God sent cherubim to guard the tree of life (Genesis 3:24)
Adam - Adam was made a perfect man-complete in every physical, mental, and spiritual endowment; and placed in the Garden of Eden on probation, holy and happy, but liable to sin. Sovereign grace interposed; a Savior was revealed, and the full execution of the curse stayed; but Adam was banished from Eden and its tree of life, and reduced to a life of painful toil
Garden - ... Important Gardens The garden of Eden (Genesis 2:8 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ) was planted by God (Genesis 2:8 ) and entrusted to Adam for cultivating and keeping (Genesis 2:15 ). Following their sin, Adam and Eve were banished from the garden; but “Eden the garden of God” (Ezekiel 28:13 ) continued as a symbol of blessing and bounty (Ezekiel 36:35 ; Joel 2:3 )
Euphrates - EUPHRATES , one of the rivers of Eden ( Genesis 2:14 ), derives its name from the Assyr
Possessed of the Devil - From the first moment the arch fiend entered the garden of Eden, through all the exercises of the faithful, he is only accomplishing the gracious purposes of God
Fare - So on he fares, and to the border comes of Eden
Locusts - They are remarkable for the immense numbers that suddenly swarm upon a district, and for the vast devastation they accomplish in vegetation in a little while, as the prophet says, before them the land may be as the garden of Eden, and behind them a desolate wilderness: nothing escapes them
Onyx - It is first mentioned with the gold and bdellium of the river Pison in Eden: but the meaning of the Hebrew word is not easily determined
Restore - - Loss of Eden, till one greater man restore it, and regain the blissful seat
Euphra'Tes - The Euphrates is first mentioned in Scripture as one of the four rivers of Eden
Cherub (1) - of Eden (after Adam's fall) God placed (yashkeen , 'set as the dwelling place of His Shekinah glory') the Cherubim, and a flaming sword which turned every way to keep the way of life" (Genesis 3:24). of Eden, the first sacrifices were offered (Genesis 4:3-4; Genesis 4:16; Genesis 3:21). The placing of the man-like Cherub on the inheritance once man's suggested the truth that man and the creatures involved in his fall have still by some gracious mystery, of which the Cherubim are the pledge, an interest in Eden. ... The pagan knowledge of the cherubim of the Book of Revelation is implied in Ezekiel 28:13-14, where the king of Tyre is represented as having been "in Eden the garden of God," and as boasting that he is "the anointed cherub that covereth," i. At Eden the cherubim are mysteriously indefinite
Touch - 3:3 in the Garden of Eden story, where the woman reminds the serpent that God had said: “Ye shall not eat of [the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden], neither shall ye touch it
Euphrates - Eden, wherein it is mentioned as one of the four, rivers. (See Eden
Paradise - The LXX_ translators adopted the word as the translation of the Hebrew name for the Garden of Eden. -Paradise, or the Garden of Eden, belongs to one important group of motifs which comparative religion shows to be present in nearly all primitive religions, the group of ideas associated with a Golden Age, a time of supernatural fertility and prosperity, lost in the past and to be restored in the future. On the other hand, the Hebrew phrase ‘Garden of Eden’ is kept to describe the earthly or the heavenly place of bliss commonly denoted by the name ‘Paradise
Cain (1) - of Eden before the cherubic symbols of God was probably the appointed place of offering. of Eden where the cherubim were), and offering it in faith thou shalt be accepted and may have lifting up of countenance again (Job 11:15; Job 22:26). "It shall come to pass that every one that findeth me shall slay me," words implying that the human race had even then multiplied since Adam's expulsion from Eden, a fact also appearing from Cain having a wife, doubtless one of Adam's descendants; the sacred historian only giving one or two prominent links of the genealogy, not the sons, much less the daughters, all in full. Adam was placed in Eden to until it, and his power of knowledge and speech was exercised in naming the beasts
Sacrifice - In the garden of Eden we find their observance
Cain - Cain, being thus banished from the presence of the Lord, retired into the land of Nod, lying east from the province of Eden
Cherubim - at the East of the Garden of Eden He caused to dwell in a tabernacle the cherubim, and the flaming sword which turned itself to keep the way of the Tree of Life
Take Away - In other passages this verb is virtually a helping verb serving to prepare for an action stipulated in a subsequent verb; God “took” Adam and put him into the garden of Eden (Gen. 2:15, where the Lord “took” Adam and put him into Eden
Gihon - (See Eden
Garden - Paradise, Eden [Garden of]
Beautiful - In Genesis it is said of all the trees in the garden of Eden, Genesis 2:9 , especially of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, Genesis 3:6 ; of the countenances of Rebekah, Genesis 26:7 , Rachel, Genesis 29:17 and Joseph, Genesis 39:6
Tree - It has been thought so by some writers, and there is reason for the opinion; and when we consider how God the Holy Ghost, from the description of the garden of Eden, in the very opening of the Bible, to the closing the canon of Scripture, in the description of the Paradise of God, makes use of the several names of "the tree of life, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil," which were evidently symbolical and sacramental, I cannot but pause over the several elegantly and highly finished representations which the whole Book of God abounds with, more or less, from beginning to end, and accept them as such
Justinus - The third, or female principle, identified with the earth, is called Eden and Israel, destitute of knowledge and subject to anger, of a double form, a woman above the middle, a snake below
Cherubim - A different version of this story is alluded to by Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 28:14 ; Ezekiel 28:16 ); according to this prophet, a cherub expels the prince of Tyre from Eden, the garden of God. The writer of the story of the Garden of Eden had some such figures in mind
Euphrates - This river is first mentioned in connection with the garden of Eden, but cannot be thereby traced
Command - In the Garden of Eden (the first appearance of this word in the Bible), God “commanded” (“set down the rule”): “Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: …” (Gen
Divine Retribution - However, banishment from Eden, the flood, and multiplication of languages followed on the heels of sin
Locust - It may be 'like the garden of Eden before them, but behind them is a desolate wilderness
Adam - He was placed in the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it, showing that occupation was a good thing for man even in innocence
Adam - He was placed in the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it, showing that occupation was a good thing for man even in innocence
Euphrates - According to that view which places the Garden of Eden near the junction of the Tigris with the Euphrates, these might be regarded as the four rivers of Paradise
Foreigner - The creation account records the first human residence in the garden of Eden. They must live in hope and faith, praying for the invasion of the kingdom and waiting patiently for the gift of a new Canaan, a new Eden, where they can reside with their God (Revelation 21-22 )
Dispensations - ... (1) The dispensation of innocence in Eden
Monoimus - Further traces of the obligations of Monoimus to Simon are found in the reference to the six powers instrumental in creation, which answer to Simon's six "roots," while a similar indebtedness to Simon on the part of the Naassene writer in Hippolytus is found on comparing the anatomical speculations connected with the name Eden (v
Tree of Life - Driven out from the Garden of Eden, he was effectually debarred from this Divine good. For those who have been purified by faith, the doom man brought on himself in Eden, of prohibition from its food, is repealed
Human Free Will - Sin became an inherited part of the inner nature of mankind at the fall in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:6 )
Enoch - It was situated on the east of the province of Eden
Adam (1) - Adam's naming of the animals in Eden implies that God endued Adam with that power of generalization based on knowledge of their characteristics, whereby he classified those of the same kinds under distinctive appellations, which is the fundamental notion of human language. ... Eden (See Eden) is by Sir H. Rawlinson identified with Babylonia; the Babylonian documents giving an exact geographical account of the garden of Eden, and the rivers bearing the same names: the Hiddekel is certainly the Tigris, and the Phrath the Euphrates; the other two seem tributary branches, though some make Gihon the Nile and Pison the Indus (?)
Adam - ... On the Babylonian affinities with the story of Adam, see Creation, Eden
Dispensation, - In reviewing God's administrations with man, we may notice the state of innocence in Eden, though it hardly partook of the character of a dispensation
Sexuality, Human - ... Accordingly, since narratives of Eden before the fall picture the unsullied created order as God ordained it, they become normative and prescriptive; hence the way that unfallen man interfaced with woman should provide a working model for male/female relationships in the community of the redeemed. Jesus, untainted by the fall ( Hebrews 4:15 ), lived the only unfallen life since humanity's banishment from Eden. His life, therefore, like the Edenic narratives, becomes normative and thus exemplary and prescriptive in matters of morality. As can be demonstrated by the overt parallels between Eden and the New Jerusalem portrayed in Revelation 21-22 , the world to come (the eschaton) will be established as a postfallen order with the effects of the fall fully negated. But when sin entered with the fall, resulting in banishment from Eden (Genesis 3:24 ), shame came with it also; a barrier was erected to the sort of naive innocence that had characterized the relationship previously. If an inquiry be made as to what are the characteristics of that union, the following emerge from the Edenic narrative: ... It is an exclusive union. Sexual activity outside the marital bond violates the Edenic pattern, whether such activity be premarital promiscuity or postmarital adultery. Because more females are born than males and because the equal access to food supplies that had existed in Eden was corrupted into an economic system dominated by males, most ancient societies allowed polygyny as a means of assuring females economic viability. In the Gospels, Jesus makes an appeal to the Edenic narrative and order of creation theology in order to demonstrate the inappropriateness of casually dissolving a marriage (Matthew 19:4-5 ; Mark 10:6-8 ). One cannot help being struck by the Edenic tone to this interchange where the partners are candid in their sexuality, yet not ashamed. Bestiality, practiced to some extent in every ancient rural society and known from Egyptian, Canaanite, and Hittite sources, is condemned in Scripture (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:15-16 ; Deuteronomy 27:21 ) for much the same reason as is homosexuality: in the Edenic narrative the possibility of a sexually bonded liaison with an animal is expressly ruled out (Genesis 2:20 ). Bestiality rejects the human sexual partner God has ordained in favor of an animal that the Edenic narrative has expressly rejected. The pattern ordained by God in Eden is man and woman, not human and animal
Good, Goodness - The choice between good and evil has lain before people since the garden of Eden when Adam and Eve ate fruit from the "tree of the knowledge of good and evil" (Genesis 2:9 )
Abel - of Eden ("the presence of the Lord": Genesis 4:16; Genesis 3:24), where the first sacrifices were offered
Adam - The separation which sin causes is emphasized in the account of the expulsion from Eden ( Genesis 3:22-24 )
Walk - For example, Adam and Eve heard the sound of God “walking” to and fro in the garden of Eden (Gen
Line - Eden stretched her line from Auran eastward to the royal towers of great Seleucia
Paradise - ... We are apt to confine our ideas of the word paradise to the garden of Eden, as being so during our first parents' innocence; and this being lost, we now look forward to the possession of a better paradise in the kingdom of glory
Adam - The Garden of Eden in Moses, delightful as it is, is but a dim, a faded, and a colourless picture of what God had prepared for them that were to walk with Him in that garden, and were to tell Him, as they walked with Him, how much they loved Him who had planted it. But all the time, as Thomas Goodwin says, the true Garden of Eden was in the gardener's own heart. But, how it went with Adam and with Eve, and with the Garden of Eden, and with Cain and Abel their children, Moses tells us in his sad history. And thus it is that he dips his pen in such an inkhorn of tears, and describes to us with such sympathy, and in such sad words, that aboriginal mystery of iniquity-the temptation, the fall, and the expulsion of Adam from Eden. O, if Adam had only believed God about sin and death! O, if he had only stopped his ears against the father of lies! O, if he could only have foretasted guilt and remorse and agony of conscience as he was led up to the tree! O, if he could only at that fatal moment have foreseen that coming garden where the Son of God Himself lay among the dark olive-trees recoiling from sin and death in a sweat of blood! O, if he could only have seen spread out before him all the death-beds of all his children on the earth, and all the beds of their second death in hell! O Adam and Eve in Eden, and still under the tree of temptation, look before it is too late; look on through the endless ages at the unutterable woes that you are working! 'Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die
Wicked (2) - violence (Matthew 5:39, Acts 17:5, 2 Thessalonians 3:2), hypocrisy (Matthew 22:18), an unforgiving spirit (Matthew 18:32), idleness (Matthew 25:26), unbelief (Hebrews 3:12), self-sufficiency (James 4:16), spite (3 John 1:10); everything, in fact, that is unlike Christ, flourishes in the devil’s Eden—the lost world
Paradise (2) - Paradise became to her the lost Eden, the garden of the four rivers and the two mystic trees
Dispensation - Innocency (Genesis 1:28 ) This is the period of time in the Garden of Eden
Blessedness - The original experience of Adam and Eve in Eden is a blessedness derived from a creation in which God provides for their spiritual well-being with his companionship and their physical needs with the garden's trees (Genesis 2 )
Obedience - ... God's clear instructions to the very first human beings in the garden of Eden was to refrain from eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:16 )
Garden - Gardens were in idolatrous periods made the scene of superstition and image worship, the awful counterpart of the primitive Eden (Isaiah 1:29; Isaiah 65:3; Isaiah 66:17)
Gate - ... The threshold in the Assyrian palaces is one slab of gypsum with cuneatic inscriptions; human-headed bulls with eagles' wings guard the portals, like and probably borrowed from the cherubim which guarded the gate of Eden; besides there are holes 12 in
Genesis, Book of - ) The theory of Moses having copied from various documents, is carried all through the Pentateuch, and with many it has issued in the very sad result of undermining the inspiration of scripture, and attributing to the Lord, when He speaks of Moses having written the law, the use of the common tradition though it was not true!... Sin soon came in, and man, after hiding himself from God, was under sentence of death, and was driven out of Eden lest he should eat of the tree of life and live for ever in his sin
Mediator - Man, in his state of innocence, was in friendship with God; but, by sinning against him, he exposed himself to his just displeasure; his powers became enfeebled, and his heart filled with enmity against him, Romans 8:6 : he was driven out of his paradisaical Eden, and totally incapable of returning to God, and making satisfaction to his justice
Come Up, Ascend - 2:6 (the first occurrence of the word), which reports that Eden was watered by a mist or stream that “went up” over the ground
Send - God sent man out of the garden of Eden; He made man leave (Gen
Condemnation - ... In the Old Testament rebellion against God began in the garden of Eden (Genesis 3 )
Nature - Christians know that human sin affected nature from the time of the rebellion in Eden (Genesis 3:17-19), but they know also that when they are finally delivered from the effects of sin, nature also will be delivered (Romans 8:19-23)
Heaven - ... It is no longer merely a garden as Eden, but a heavenly "city" and garden combined, nature and art no longer mutually destructive, but enhancing each the charm of the other, individuality and society realized perfectly (Revelation 2-3, 7, 21-22)
Thieves - " (See PARADISE; Eden
Go Out, Go Forth - 2:10 (the first occurrence of the word) reports that a river “came forth” or “flowed out” from the garden of Eden
Presence of God - Adam and Eve's sinfulness drove them to hide from the Lord in the garden of Eden (Genesis 3:8 )
Will - The story of redemption is founded on God's offer to humanity to return to the fullness of relationship lost in Eden, despite its radical consequences
Keep - And the Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden, to dress it and to keep it
Babylon - This was the region where the biblical story of early human history is centred and where the Garden of Eden was located (Genesis 2:10-14)
Euphrates - This was the region where the garden of Eden was located (Genesis 2:10-14)
Judgment Day - Judgment Day follows the resurrection of the dead and determines the eternal destiny of the righteous (either Paradise in Heaven or on a renewed earth, or life in the heavenly Jerusalem or in the heavenly Garden of Eden come down to earth) and of the wicked (Gehenna or some other place of eternal punishment) based on their obedience/disobedience to the law of God
Lot - For example, the Jordan Valley is described as being well watered “like the garden of the Lord” (Genesis 13:10 ) reminding one of the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden
Cherubim - At the entrance of the garden of Eden, after the fall, we find the cherubim and a flaming sword placed
Set On, Set Up - ... In its first biblical appearance śı̂ym means “to put or place someone somewhere”: “And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed” (Gen
Cosmas (3), Indian Navigator - Beyond the ocean, on each side of the interior continent, lies another land, in which is the Garden of Eden. The Nile is the Gihon of Eden
False Worship - Its presence in the Bible extends from the self-exalting disobedience in the Garden of Eden to compromising accommodation with the emperor cult and other pagan religions seen in the Book of Revelation
Syria - The Old Testament mentions the Aramean kingdoms of Beth-Eden in north Syria, Zobah in south-central Syria, and Damascus in the south
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - Sin has produced a hesitancy and reservation about sex among the biblical characters and writers as compared with the lack of shame in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:25 ). The New Testament teaches that in Christ this Edenic complementariness is restored (2 Corinthians 5:17 ; Galatians 3:28 ; Ephesians 5:21-33 )
Land, Ground - Every beast and every bird was also formed from the ground ( Genesis 2:19 )... After sin entered the Garden of Eden, God described death in terms of the basic elements from which Adam was created: Adam would work and eat “til thou return unto the ground; (for out of it wast thou taken; for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return” (Genesis 3:19 )
Song of Solomon, Theology of - ... Indeed, the Song must be read in the context of the garden of Eden, where human sexuality is first introduced
New Jerusalem - The tree of life (Revelation 22:2 ) hearkens back to the prefall Eden
Call - The “calling” on God’s name is clearly not the beginning of prayer, since communication between God and man existed since the Garden of Eden; nor is it an indication of the beginning of formal worship, since formal worship began at least as early as the offerings of Cain and Abel (Gen
Keep, Watch, Guard - So God put Adam “into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it” (Gen
Separate - 2:10: “And a river went out of Eden … and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads
Hutchinsonians - The cherubim, which have been thought "angels placed as a guard to deter Adam from breaking into Eden again," he explains to have been a hieroglyphic of divine construction, or a sacred image, to describe, as far as figures could go, the Aleim and man taken in, or humanity united to deity
Revelation, Idea of - In Genesis 1 we read his mandate to the first humans, then in chapter 2 his specific instructions for life in Eden, and in chapter 3 his discovery of and response to the sinin all of which we read of this characteristic divine activity in speech . " And then, as the cosmogony resolves into the narrower dimensions of Eden, we read that the Lord God commanded Adam concerning the trees of the gardenwhich to eat, and which not to eat (2:16-17)
Fall of Man - The creation of the world, of man, of woman; the planting of the garden of Eden, and the placing of man there; the duties and prohibitions laid upon him; his disobedience; his expulsion from the garden; the subsequent birth of his children, their lives, and actions, and those of their posterity, down to the flood; and, from that event, to the life of Abraham, are given in the same plain and unadorned narrative; brief, but yet simple; and with no intimation at all, either from the elevation of the style or otherwise, that a fable or allegory is in any part introduced. "Eden" and "the garden of the Lord" are also frequently referred to in the prophets
Building - This "sacred geography" includes Eden ( Genesis 2:8 ), Bethel (Genesis 28:10-22 ), Sinai (Exodus 3:5-6 ; 19:18-20 ; 24:16 ; 34:5 ; Deuteronomy 4:12 ; 5:24 ; Psalm 68:8 ; cf
Abstain, Abstinence - Even in the pristine garden of Eden God told Adam to abstain from eating the fruit of a certain tree
Way - 3:24 (the first occurrence of the word) it means “path” or “route”: “… And he placed at the east of the garden of Eden cherubim, and a flaming sword which turned every [direction], to [guard] the way of the tree of life
Locust - So justly have they been compared by the prophet to a great army; who further observes, that the land is as the Garden of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate wilderness
Satan (2) - The complete revelation of such a being as the malignant author of evil was reserved for the time when, with the advent of Christ’s Kingdom, the minds of God’s people were prepared, without risk of idolatry, or of the mischievous dualism of such a religion as that of Zoroaster, to recognize in the serpent of Eden and in the Satan who appeared as the adversary of Job and of Joshua, the great Adversary of God and man, whose power is to be feared and his temptations resolutely resisted, but from whose dark dominion the Son of God had come to deliver mankind. John in his First Epistle repeats the teaching of his Gospel, and in the Apocalypse identifies Satan with the serpent of Eden, and seemingly also with the accuser of Job and of Joshua (Revelation 12:9-10), and foretells his coming doom
Love - In the garden of Eden, God commanded that "you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die" (Genesis 2:17 )
Lie, Lying - ... In the garden of Eden the serpent denied the truth of God's pronouncement and encouraged the woman to act in defiance of divine truth (Genesis 3:4 )
Gardens - The idea of such an enclosure was certainly borrowed from the garden of Eden, which the bountiful Creator planted for the reception of our first parents
Sabbath - ... The CHRISTIAN SABBATH is the original day of rest established in the Garden of the Eden and reenacted on Sinai, without those requirements, which were peculiar to Judaism, but with all its original moral force and with the new sanctions of Christianity
Ethics - Thus the divine word in the Garden of Eden, “you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Genesis 2:17 NIV) or our Lord's, “Untie [the colt]” ( Luke 19:30 ) were intended only for the couple in the garden of Eden or the disciples
Death - The account of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 2:1;b13 ) clearly points to sin as the reason humans must experience death (Genesis 2:17 ; Genesis 3:3 )
Lamentations, Theology of - Still, that sin results in punitive measures is an understanding dating from the transgression in Eden
Satan - ... Now the Scriptures of God relate to us that the devil, under the appearance of a serpent, beguiled our first parents in the garden of Eden, prompted them to break the divine commands, and by so doing introduced death into the circumstrances of them and all their posterity
Satan - ) The Zendavesta has an account of the temptation in Eden nearest that of Genesis, doubtless derived from the primitive tradition
Head - 2:10 (the first occurrence): “And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became [the source of four rivers]. In Ezra 9:2, ri'shôn is used both of precEdence in time and of leadership: “… The holy seed have mingled themselves with the people of those lands: yea, the hand of the princes and rulers hath been chief in this trespass
Fall - It tells how the first man and woman, living in childlike innocence and happiness in the Garden of Eden, were tempted by the subtle serpent to doubt the goodness of their Creator, and aim at the possession of forbidden knowledge by tasting the fruit of the one tree of which they had been expressly charged not to eat
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Significant biblical references to four include the four corners of the earth (Isaiah 11:12 ), the four winds (Jeremiah 49:36 ), four rivers which flowed out of Eden to water the world (Genesis 2:10-14 ), and four living creatures surrounding God (Ezekiel 1:1 ; Revelation 4:6-7 )
Sin - ... Origin of sin... From the activity of Satan in the Garden of Eden, it is clear that sin was present in the universe before Adam and Eve sinned
Fall, the - The New Testament does not give any crEdence to that view. They were created as the crown of creation and given Eden, the garden palace, as their home in which they were to carry out their roles and mandates
New Creation - " In 4:26 the term "new creation" appears to have become a technical term within the vocabulary of this stream of Jewish eschatology ("the Garden of Eden, and the Mount of the East, Mount Sinai, and Mount Zion will be sanctified in the new creation"); connected with the concept are the ideas of the purification of the earth and God's people from sin
Creation - The accounts of creation in Genesis 1-2 prepare the reader for the record of the first people being placed in the Garden of Eden, temptation by the serpent, rebellion against God, expulsion from the garden, and the degenerating effect of sin in society
Create, Creation - This sort of investigation reveals a degree of similarity between the Bible and antecEdent Near Eastern literature. The consequences of the fall will be reversed and a renewal of the fruitfulness and vitality that first characterized the cosmos and the garden of Eden will take place (Isaiah 65:17-25 ; 66:22 ; Ezekiel 47:1-12 ; Joel 3:18 ; Amos 9:13 ; Romans 8:18-23 ; 2 Peter 3:7,10-13 ; Revelation 21:1-22:5 ). However, Scripture cautions that only those who have experienced spiritual re-creation may enjoy the eschatological Eden (Revelation 21:1-2,6-8,27 ; 22:14-15 )
Creation - The accounts of creation and of the construction of the tabernacle resemble each other (the world being God's great tabernacle, Psalm 19); the general plan first (Genesis 1), then the actual creation of the first pair, Eden, etc. So, in creation, the process begins with the lower creatures, plants, and animals, then, man, creation's priest, Eden, and lastly the sabbath
Mark, the Gospel According to - ... He notices Jesus being "with the wild beasts" when tempted by Satan in the wilderness; contrast Adam tempted amidst the tame animals in Eden (Genesis 2; 3)
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - We have never had deeper-wading preachers than Jonathan Edwards and Thomas Boston, and never since the garden of Eden has there been two ministers happier at home than they were
Abel - ... If Cain had only done the exact opposite of what he immediately did as soon as he had buried Abel: if he had only determined in spite of it all still to abide in the land of Eden; if he had only kept himself in the presence of the Lord, and had not allowed himself to go out from the presence of the Lord; if he had only laid the foundations of his city beside Abel's grave, then Abel's prayer for his brother would have been heard, and Abel's blood from that day would have begun to speak almost like the blood of Christ itself
Biblical Theology - ... Evil's origin is shrouded in considerable (not utter) mystery, but it was personified in a serpentine figure of intelligence and beauty who beguiled both human inhabitants of Eden (chap. It also sets the stage for the dramatic exodus from Egypt through the Red (or Reed) Sea (13:17-22), a historical precEdent and enduring symbol of divine deliverance by God's own hand in all ages since. The messianic deliverance already foretold in Eden (Genesis 3:15 ) finds definitive expression in the Messiah Jesus
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - This idea pervades all Scripture, from the original Eden (Genesis 2:21-24) down to the restored paradise (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9-10; Revelation 22:17)
Balaam - Availing himself of his head knowledge of divine truth, he, like Satan in Eden, used it with fiendish wisdom to break the union between God and Israel by tempting the latter to sin by lust
Angel - The first was "cherubim, " a plural form, conceived of as winged creatures (Exodus 25:20 ), and mentioned first in connection with the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden (Genesis 3:24 )
Life - Central and vital to life in paradise was access to the tree of life in the midst of the garden of Eden (Genesis 2:9 )
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - 6, 7)]; he foretells their captivity and return; salvation will arise from Judah and Levi; Beliar will be overthrown; ‘the saints shall rest in Eden, and in the New Jerusalem shall the righteous rejoice’ (v. 1), and ἡ τρυφή for ‘Eden’ (עֵדָן, xxv
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The Book of Revelation ends where Genesis began, in an Edenic garden. All subsequent passages depend upon these established motifs until the consummation in the Apocalypse delivers humankind and places them in an eternal utopia like the Garden of Eden
Abraham - ... Loving confidence takes the place of instinctive fear, as in man's intercourse with God in Eden; Moses similarly (Exodus 33:11; Numbers 12:8); Peter, James, and John on the mount of transfiguration (Matthew 17)
Gennesaret, Land of - ... Such is the land of Gennesaret, on the immediate edge of which lay Capernaum, and over whose ‘Eden-like landscape’ the feet of our blessed Lord so often trod as He went about preaching from village to village, healing the sick and raising to life the dead
Lazarus - ’ (c) There were three Jewish phrases descriptive of the state of the righteous after death: ‘in the Garden of Eden’ or ‘Paradise’; ‘under the throne of glory’ (cf
Enoch - Commonplace men see now and then a skirt of God, and catch now and then a broken ray, a scintilla, as a mystic would say, of God's glory; but Enoch walked with God up and down the land of Eden, as a man walketh with his friend
Abel - Some have thought that this was at the east gate of Eden, where "Cherubim and a flaming sword were placed;" but this was a vengeful manifestation, and could only have inspired a dread of God inconsistent with the confidence and hope with which men through the promise of redemption were now encouraged to draw nigh to him. ... This revelation was necessarily antecEdent to the faith; but it is also to be observed, that the acts by which the faith was represented, whenever it was represented by particular acts, and when the case admitted it, had a natural and striking conformity and correspondence to the previous revelation. We must therefore interpret the acts of Abel's faith so as to make them also correspond with an antecEdent revelation. His faith led him to offer "a more excellent sacrifice" than that of Cain; but this as necessarily implies, that there was some antecEdent revelation to which his faith, as thus expressed, had respect, and on which that peculiarity of his offering, which distinguished it from the offering of Cain, was founded; a revelation which indicated that the way in which God would be approached acceptably, in solemn worship, was by animal sacrifices. The antecEdent revelation was, therefore, a promise of a benefit to be conferred, by means of animal sacrifice; and we are taught what this benefit was, by that which was actually received by the offerer,—"He obtained witness that he was righteous;" which must be interpreted in the sense of a declaration of his personal justification, and acceptance as righteous, by the forgiveness of his sins. If then we refer to the subsequent sacrifices of expiation appointed by Divine authority, and their explanation in the New Testament, it will be obvious to what doctrines and principles of an antecEdent revelation the faith of Abel had respect, and which his sacrifice, the exhibition of his faith, proclaimed: confession of the fact of being a sinner,—acknowledgment that the demerit and penalty of sin is death,— submission to an appointed mode of expiation,—animal sacrifice offered vicariously, but in itself a mere type of a better sacrifice, "the Seed of the woman," appointed to be offered at some future period,—and the efficacy of this appointed method of expiation to obtain forgiveness, and to admit the guilty into the Divine favour
Agriculture - Adam, placed in the Garden of Eden, is ‘to dress it and to keep it’ (Genesis 2:15); driven from it, he is sent ‘to till the ground from whence he was taken’ (Genesis 3:23)
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - Before them the land is like the garden of Eden, behind them, a desert waste" (2:3). On the other hand, the scenes about God's blessing and the recovery of an Edenic paradise have and will continue to offer hope for those whose trust is in God (2 Peter 3:13 )
Clean And Unclean - The taboo on the tree in Eden ( Genesis 3:3 ) hardly calls for discussion
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Euphrates First mentioned in Genesis 2:14 as one of the four branches of the river that watered the Garden of Eden, the Euphrates flows 1,700 miles to become the longest river in Western Asia
Jerusalem - ... The Bible begins with a bucolic setting in the Garden of Eden; it closes on an urban scene, and that city is the New Jerusalem
Evil - The origins for sin and evil in both Old and New Testaments are traced to the activities of an evil creature, Satan (1 John 3:8 : "the devil has been sinning from the beginning" ) and to human sin that led to a fall (Romans 5:12-14 ) and banishment form Eden and the tree of life (Genesis 3 )
Type - The Garden of Eden prefigures and anticipates ‘the Paradise of God’ (Revelation 2:7); the tree of life in the midst of the garden (Genesis 2:9), from which fallen man had to be debarred (Revelation 3:22), another tree of life, whose fruit is given to be eaten (Revelation 2:7) and whose leaves are for the healing of the nations (Revelation 22:2)
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - " He regrets his departure from Caesarea, as Adam might bewail his expulsion from Eden, having to eat of the soil, to contend with thorns and thistles, and dwell in darkness, weeping and mourning
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - Next, 12 sermons on the Paradise of Eden (pp
Amos, Theology of - The prophet anticipates a time of unprecEdented revitalization. This renewed existence is described in terms that suggest a restored Eden and a new creation (cf
Hell - Our surprise is not lessened by the recollection of the fact that, according to the Rabbis, ‘seven things were created before the world-Torah, Gehenna, the Garden of Eden, the Throne of Glory, the Sanctuary, Repentance, and the Name of Messiah
Adam - He created him after his own image and resemblance; and having blessed him, he placed him in a delicious garden, in Eden, that he might cultivate it, and feed upon its fruits, Genesis 2:8 ; but under the following injunction: "Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die
Hell - Our surprise is not lessened by the recollection of the fact that, according to the Rabbis, ‘seven things were created before the world-Torah, Gehenna, the Garden of Eden, the Throne of Glory, the Sanctuary, Repentance, and the Name of Messiah
Noah - Terror, not as in Eden love, should subject the lower animals to man, God's vicegerent
God - The parallel creation narrative of Genesis 2:4b-25 further communicates this view of God as personal in anthromorphic terms as he forms man from the dust of the ground, breathes the breath of life into his nostrils, makes the birds and beasts of the field, fashions woman from the man, and finally plants a garden for their habitat in Eden
Work - A return to Eden has finally been accomplished, where the new Adams and Eves, crowned with glory and honor, are restored finally to their rightful positions as kings and queens of the new creation, God's resplendent images, who will exercise dominion through service and love (22:1-5)
Canaan - A sight of this territory can alone convey any adequate idea of its surprising produce: it is truly the Eden of the east, rejoicing, in the abundance of its wealth
Enoch Book of - 1-6, 25); Leviathan a female monster, and Behemoth a male, parted, one in the abysses of the ocean, the other in the wilderness to the east of the garden (Eden) where Enoch was taken up; they shall feed … (presumably till given as food to the elect as in 2 Bar