Places Study on Cnidus

Places Study on Cnidus

Acts 27: And when we had sailed slowly many days, and scarce were come over against Cnidus, the wind not suffering us, we sailed under Crete, over against Salmone;

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Hitchcock's Bible Names - Cnidus
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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cnidus
CNIDUS . A city of Caria, in S.W. of Asia Minor. It was the dividing point between the S. and W. coasts of Asia Minor, and at this point St. Paul’s ship changed its course in the voyage to Rome ( Acts 27:7 ). It contained Jewish inhabitants as early as the 2nd cent. b.c. ( 1Ma 15:23 ), and had the rank of a free city.

A. Souter.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Cnidus
A town and harbour on the extreme south-west of the peninsula of Doris in Asia Minor. Paul sailed past it on his voyage to Rome after leaving Myra (Acts 27:7 ).

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Cnidus
City and seaport on the extreme S.W. corner of Asia Minor. Acts 27:7 . The spot is now called Cape Krio .

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cnidus
(Κνίδος)

Cnidus was a city of Caria, at the S.W. angle of Asia Minor, between the islands of Cos and Rhodes. It lay at the end of a long peninsula-Triopium-which juts into the aegean Sea and forms the southern shore of the Sinus Ceramicus. Strabo (XIV. ii. 15) accurately describes it: ‘Cnidus has two harbours, one of which is a close harbour, fit for receiving triremes, and a naval station for twenty ships. In front of the city is an island, seven stadia in circuit; it rises high, in the form of a theatre, and is joined by a mole to the mainland, making Cnidus in a manner two cities, for a great part of the inhabitants live on the island, which shelters both the harbours.’ In the lapse of time the mole has become a sandy isthmus. The situation of the city in the highway of the seas gave it much commercial importance. It was a free city of the Roman Empire. Jews were settled there in the Maccabaean period (1 Maccabees 15:23).

St. Paul’s ship of Alexandria sailed from Myra ‘slowly’ and ‘with difficulty,’ probably on account of adverse winds rather than of calms, taking ‘many days’ to come ‘over against Cnidus.’ The distance between the two ports was 130 miles, which with a fair wind could have been run in one day. After passing the point which divides the southern from the western coast, the ship was in a worse position than before, having no longer the advantage of a weather shore, and being exposed to the full force of the N.W. winds-called Etesian-which prevail in the aegean towards the end of summer. Instead of taking a straight course to the north of Crete-the wind not permitting this (μὴ προσεῶντος ἡμᾶς τοῦ ἀνέμον)-she had to run under the lee of the island. Some interpret St. Luke’s words as meaning that the crew made a vain attempt to reach Cnidus, ‘the wind not allowing’ them; but there was apparently no reason why they should not have entered the southern harbour, which was well sheltered from N.W. winds.

Literature.-C. T. Newton and R. P. Pullan, Hist. of Discoveries at Halicarnassus, Cnidus and Branchidae, 1863; T. Lewin, St. Paul, 1875, ii. 190; Conybeare-Howson, St. Paul, 1856, ii. 390ff.; W. Smith, Dict. of Gr. and Rom. Geog. i. [1856] 638ff.

James Strahan.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Cnidus
Cnidus (nî'dus). A Greek city at the extreme southwestern corner of Asia Minor, now in ruins, on Cape Crio.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Cnidus
(cni' duhss) Place name of city in southwest Turkey. Paul's ship passed by here on the way to Rome (Acts 27:7 ).



American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Cnidus
A town and peninsula of Doris in Caria, jutting out from the southwest corner of Asia Minor, between the islands of Rhodes and Cos. It had a fine harbor, and was celebrated for the worship of Venus. Paul passed by it in his voyage to Rome, Acts 27:7 .

Sentence search

Salmone - Then we read, when they "scarce were come over against Cnidus," they made cape Salmone which bears S. by Salmone from Cnidus. ) The ship's direct course from Myra to Italy after reaching Cnidus lay N. From Myra to Cnidus they had been able to work up with N. winds, though slowly, because until they reached Cnidus they had the advantage of a weather shore, under the lee of which they had smooth water and a westerly current. But at Cnidus that advantage ceased; thence their only course was under the lee of Crete toward Salmone
Cnidus - Cnidus (nî'dus)
Cnidus - (Κνίδος)... Cnidus was a city of Caria, at the S. 15) accurately describes it: ‘Cnidus has two harbours, one of which is a close harbour, fit for receiving triremes, and a naval station for twenty ships. In front of the city is an island, seven stadia in circuit; it rises high, in the form of a theatre, and is joined by a mole to the mainland, making Cnidus in a manner two cities, for a great part of the inhabitants live on the island, which shelters both the harbours. Paul’s ship of Alexandria sailed from Myra ‘slowly’ and ‘with difficulty,’ probably on account of adverse winds rather than of calms, taking ‘many days’ to come ‘over against Cnidus. Luke’s words as meaning that the crew made a vain attempt to reach Cnidus, ‘the wind not allowing’ them; but there was apparently no reason why they should not have entered the southern harbour, which was well sheltered from N. of Discoveries at Halicarnassus, Cnidus and Branchidae, 1863; T
Salmone - Paul’s ship, after reaching Cnidus with difficulty, was met by a powerful N
Cnidus - Cnidus
Crete - Paul's ship was constrained by contrary winds off Cnidus to sail under the lee of Crete "over against Salmone"; having passed which with difficulty the ship reached FAIR HAVENS, near Lasea
Ship - (On PAUL'S voyage, see EUROCLYDON; MELITA; Cnidus; CRETE; FAIR HAVENS
Antiochus - This prince was then at Cnidus, where his father, Demetrius Soter had placed him with one of his friends
Palestine - ) The "beveling," thought to be Jewish, is really common throughout Asia Minor; it is found at Persepolis, Cnidus, and Athens