Places Study on Cenchreae

Places Study on Cenchreae

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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Cenchreae
CENCHREÆ (AV [Note: Authorized Version.] Cenchrea is wrong) was the southern harbour of Corinth, and was on the Saronic Gulf about 7 miles E. of Corinth. It was a mere village, and existed solely for the transit of goods to and from Corinth. Thence St. Paul set sail for Syria ( Acts 18:18 ). Phœbe, the lady commended for her service to the church here ( Romans 16:1 ), carried St. Paul’s Epistle to Rome.

A. Souter.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Cenchreae
Cenchreae (not ‘Cenchrea,’ as in Authorized Version ; Κεγχρεαί [Tischendorf], Κενχρεαί [Westcott-Hort’s Greek Testament ]; now the village of Kichries) was the eastern port of Corinth, 7 miles from the city, on the Saronic Gulf, opposite to Lechaeum on the Corinthian Gulf. ‘Cenchreae,’ says Strabo, ‘serves for the trade with Asia, and Lechaeum for that with Italy’ (viii. vi. 22). From the town of Schœnus-4 miles north of Cenchreae-where the isthmus is less than 5 miles wide, a tramway (δίολκος) was laid to the other side, upon which vessels of smaller tonnage were conveyed bodily from sea to sea, avoiding a circuitous passage by the stormy headland of Malea. In a.d. 67, Nero, impressed by an idea which had previously commended itself to greater minds-notably to that of Julius Caesar-made an abortive attempt to cut a canal across the Isthmus, a piece of engineering which was not accomplished till the end of the 19th century (1881-1893). Between Cenchreae and Schœnus was a famous sanctuary, in which stood ‘the temple of Isthmian Neptune, shaded above with a grove of pine-trees, where the Corinthians celebrated the Isthmian games’ (Strabo, loc. cit.). From the pines were cut those garlands for the brows of the victors in the stadium, which St. Paul contrasts with immortal crowns (1 Corinthians 9:24-27). At Cenchreae, St. Paul, on the eve of his sailing for Syria to attend the Passover, had his head shorn on account of a vow (Acts 18:18). During his prolonged residence in Corinth, Cenchreae had become the seat of a church, of which Phœbe was a διάκονος-if not a deaconess in the full technical meaning of later times, at any rate in a more definite sense than is implied by ‘servant’ (Romans 16:1). She was a προστάσις-succourer, patroness, guardian-of many wayfaring Christians who passed through that bustling seaport (16:2). It has generally been assumed that this Cenchrean lady, whom St. Paul so warmly commends, was the bearer of the Roman Epistle to its destination (Renan, St. Paul, 1869, p. 219), but there is strong reason to believe that Romans 16 is a letter meant for Ephesus (see Romans).

Literature.-Conybeare-Howson, Life and Epistles of St. Paul, 1856, ii. 224; T. Lewin, Life and Epistles of St. Paul3, 1875, i. 299ff.; J. G. Frazer, Pausanias, 1898, iii. 6ff.; E. B. Redlich, St. Paul and his Companions, 1913, index, s.v.

James Strahan.

Sentence search

Lucius - Tradition makes him consecrated Bishop of Cenchreae by Paul (Apost
Cenchrea - (cehn' chrih uh) or Cenchreae The eastern port city of Corinth
Cenchreae - Cenchreae (not ‘Cenchrea,’ as in Authorized Version ; Κεγχρεαί [Tischendorf], Κενχρεαί [Westcott-Hort’s Greek Testament ]; now the village of Kichries) was the eastern port of Corinth, 7 miles from the city, on the Saronic Gulf, opposite to Lechaeum on the Corinthian Gulf. ‘Cenchreae,’ says Strabo, ‘serves for the trade with Asia, and Lechaeum for that with Italy’ (viii. From the town of Schœnus-4 miles north of Cenchreae-where the isthmus is less than 5 miles wide, a tramway (δίολκος) was laid to the other side, upon which vessels of smaller tonnage were conveyed bodily from sea to sea, avoiding a circuitous passage by the stormy headland of Malea. Between Cenchreae and Schœnus was a famous sanctuary, in which stood ‘the temple of Isthmian Neptune, shaded above with a grove of pine-trees, where the Corinthians celebrated the Isthmian games’ (Strabo, loc. At Cenchreae, St. During his prolonged residence in Corinth, Cenchreae had become the seat of a church, of which Phœbe was a διάκονος-if not a deaconess in the full technical meaning of later times, at any rate in a more definite sense than is implied by ‘servant’ (Romans 16:1)
Cenchrea - Cenchrea or Cenchreae
Phoebe - ... Phoebe is described (RV_) as ‘our sister, who is a servant of the church that is at Cenchreae’ (τὴν ἀδελφὴν ἡμῶν, οὖσαν [καὶ] διάκονον τῆς ἐκκλησίας τῆς ἐν Κενχρεαῖς) and as one who ‘hath been a succourer of many and of mine own self’ (αὐτὴ προστάτις πολλῶν ἐγενήθη καὶ ἐμοῦ αὐτοῦ). ... Cenchreae (q. At the close of his stay of eighteen months he sailed from Cenchreae on his way to Syria (Acts 18:18) and (unless the latter part of the verse refers to Aquila) before setting out he shaved his head, ‘for he had a vow. A Jewish plot prevented him from sailing again from Cenchreae, and he returned to Syria via Macedonia (Acts 20:3). ... We shall suppose that Phoebe herself was sailing eastward from Cenchreae or westward from Lechaeum, the port on the Corinthian Gulf, according to the view we take of the probable destination of Romans 16 (or Romans 16:1-2, detached by some scholars from the rest of the chapter). Descriptive of Phoebe’s relation to ‘many,’ presumably at Cenchreae (perhaps at Corinth also), προστάτις must mean at the least that, in a special degree made possible by her circumstances, she discharged the duties of ‘communicating to the necessities of the saints’ and of ‘pursuing hospitality,’ which belonged to all Christians alike (Romans 12:13). Paul at Cenchreae, and that his recovery was the occasion of his vow. Certainly we may assume that she received him into her home when he visited or passed through Cenchreae (cf
lu'Cius - Paul, (Romans 16:21 ) by whom he is said by tradition to have been ordained bishop of the church of Cenchreae
Corinth - Another church was established at Cenchreae, the seaport a few kilometres east (Acts 18:18; Romans 16:1-2)
Achaia - ... A church was founded in Corinth during Paul’s second missionary journey, and another at the port of Cenchreae nearby (Acts 18:1-18; Romans 16:1; 1 Corinthians 16:15; see CORINTH)
Hair - Paul’s vow, according to which he cut off his hair at Cenchreae (Acts 18:18), and by the similar vows of the four men at Jerusalem, whose expenses St. Paul would accordingly offer at Jerusalem the hair that had grown during the month since the vow began at Cenchreae
Vote - Paul, when on his homeward route at the close of his second missionary journey, had the hair of his head cut at Cenchreae before sailing from the port, ‘for he had a vow. As his departure from Cenchreae was virtually the end of the evangelistic work of his second journey, he may have considered that his vow expired automatically at that point
Corinth - Corinth was a maritime city located between two important seaports: the port of Lechaion on the Gulf of Corinth about two miles to the north and the port of Cenchreae on the Saronic Gulf about six miles east of Corinth. An overland shiproad across the isthmus connected the ports of Lechaion and Cenchreae. From the southern part of the city a road ran southeast to Cenchreae
Deacon, Deaconess - The case of Phœbe, ‘διάκονος of the church which is in Cenchreae’ (Romans 16:1), is doubtful
Nazirite - Paul whose head was shorn at Cenchreae, ‘for he had a vow. But the supreme difficulty in holding that this was a Nazirite vow is that his head was shorn at Cenchreae, not at Jerusalem, where alone a Nazirite vow could be completed. Why he should have his head shorn in Cenchreae when in a few weeks he would be in Jerusalem is a mystery, if his was a Nazirite vow. Paul is not completing but beginning the period of his vow at Cenchreae. Paul completed at Cenchreae (see Expositor’s Greek Testament , in loc
Nazirite - Paul whose head was shorn at Cenchreae, ‘for he had a vow. But the supreme difficulty in holding that this was a Nazirite vow is that his head was shorn at Cenchreae, not at Jerusalem, where alone a Nazirite vow could be completed. Why he should have his head shorn in Cenchreae when in a few weeks he would be in Jerusalem is a mystery, if his was a Nazirite vow. Paul is not completing but beginning the period of his vow at Cenchreae. Paul completed at Cenchreae (see Expositor’s Greek Testament , in loc
Achaia - Only three Achaean cities are mentioned in the NT-Athens, Corinth, and Cenchreae-but the address of 2 Cor
Romans, Epistle to the - Phoebe, a deaconess of the neighboring church of Cenchreae, was on the point of starting for Rome, ch
Romans, the Epistle to the - Paul wrote while at Corinth, for he commends to the Romans Phoebe, deaconess of Cenchreae, the port of Corinth (Romans 16:1-2). But, as Phoebe a deaconess of the neighbouring Cenchreae was starting for Rome (Romans 16:1-2), he sends meantime this epistle by her
Nazarite - (?) Paul's shaving his head at Cenchreae was not a strict Nazarite's vow, otherwise he would have offered his hair with the sacrifices at the temple door; but a modified Nazarite vow, usual then in respect to deliverances from sickness or other calamity (Acts 18:18)
Athens - The governor had his residence at Corinth, and the merchant-princes had forsaken the Piraeus for Lecheum and Cenchreae
Roads And Travel - From Athens (Acts 17:15 to Acts 18:1) he went, by sea no doubt, to Corinth, and from there by the short land journey to the southern port of Corinth, Cenchreae (Acts 18:18). Luke sketches the sea-journeys that followed, Cenchreae to Ephesus, Ephesus to Caesarea, with great rapidity (Acts 18:19-22)
Woman - To the Roman church Paul said, “I commend to you our sister Phoebe, a deacon of the church at Cenchreae” (Romans 16:1 NRSV)
Woman - Paul speaks of Phœbe as a ‘deaconess’ of the Church at Cenchreae (Romans 16:1), in terms that suggest her ability and will to give generous help to poorer Christians
Minister, Ministration - Some can render invaluable help in the local churches, as Stephanas and his household at Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:15), and Phœbe at Cenchreae (Romans 16:1)
Woman - Paul calls Phoebe a diakonos [ διάκονος ] (probably "deacon") and prostatis [ παραστάτις , προστάτις ] (most likely "patron") of the church in Cenchreae
Romans Epistle to the - ... (4) Phoebe, a ‘deaconess’ of Cenchreae, the port of Corinth, is prominently mentioned (Romans 16:1); possibly she is the bearer of the Epistle
Paul - Before leaving Greece, he cut off his hair at Cenchreae, in fulfillment of a vow