Places Study on Ashtaroth

Places Study on Ashtaroth

Joshua 9: And all that he did to the two kings of the Amorites, that were beyond Jordan, to Sihon king of Heshbon, and to Og king of Bashan, which was at Ashtaroth.
Joshua 12: And the coast of Og king of Bashan, which was of the remnant of the giants, that dwelt at Ashtaroth and at Edrei,
Joshua 13: All the kingdom of Og in Bashan, which reigned in Ashtaroth and in Edrei, who remained of the remnant of the giants: for these did Moses smite, and cast them out.
Joshua 13: And half Gilead, and Ashtaroth, and Edrei, cities of the kingdom of Og in Bashan, were pertaining unto the children of Machir the son of Manasseh, even to the one half of the children of Machir by their families.
Judges 2: And they forsook the LORD, and served Baal and Ashtaroth.
Judges 10: And the children of Israel did evil again in the sight of the LORD, and served Baalim, and Ashtaroth, and the gods of Syria, and the gods of Zidon, and the gods of Moab, and the gods of the children of Ammon, and the gods of the Philistines, and forsook the LORD, and served not him.
1 Samuel 7: And Samuel spake unto all the house of Israel, saying, If ye do return unto the LORD with all your hearts, then put away the strange gods and Ashtaroth from among you, and prepare your hearts unto the LORD, and serve him only: and he will deliver you out of the hand of the Philistines.
1 Samuel 7: Then the children of Israel did put away Baalim and Ashtaroth, and served the LORD only.
1 Samuel 12: And they cried unto the LORD, and said, We have sinned, because we have forsaken the LORD, and have served Baalim and Ashtaroth: but now deliver us out of the hand of our enemies, and we will serve thee.
1 Samuel 31: And they put his armour in the house of Ashtaroth: and they fastened his body to the wall of Bethshan.
1 Chronicles 6: Unto the sons of Gershom were given out of the family of the half tribe of Manasseh, Golan in Bashan with her suburbs, and Ashtaroth with her suburbs:

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ashtaroth
A city of Bashan, in the kingdom of Og (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 12:4 ; 13:12 ; 9:10 ). It was in the half-tribe of Manasseh (Joshua 13:12 ), and as a Levitical city was given to the Gershonites (1 Chronicles 6:71 ). Uzzia, one of David's valiant men (1 Chronicles 11:44 ), is named as of this city. It is identified with Tell Ashterah, in the Hauran, and is noticed on monuments B.C. 1700-1500. The name Beesh-terah (Joshua 21:27 ) is a contraction for Beth-eshterah, i.e., "the house of Ashtaroth."

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ashtaroth
ASHTAROTH or ASTAROTH. A city N.E. of Jordan, called so from being a seat of Ashtoreth's worship, "Og dwelt in Ashtaroth, in Edrei" (Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 12:4; Joshua 13:12-31; Joshua 9:10). Allotted to Machir, son of Manasseh; and, out of Manasseh's portion, then allotted to the sons of Gershom, their other Levitical city here being Golan (Joshua 21:27), called Be-eshterah (i.e. Beth Ashterah, "the house of Ashtaroth.") Between Adara and Abila (according to Eusebius and-Jerome) lay two villages, probably the one Ashtaroth, the other Ashteroth-Karnaim. There is still a Tel Ashterah in this region. One of David's valiant men was Uzziah the Ashterathite (1 Chronicles 11:44).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Ashtaroth
(assh' tuhrahth) is the plural form of Ashtoreth, a Canaanite goddess of fertility, love, and war and the daughter of the god El and the goddess Asherah. 1. The Old Testament uses the plural form, Ashtaroth, more than the singular form, Ashtoreth. The only references to Ashtoreth come in 1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 . The Hebrew scribes replaced the vowels of the name Ashtart or Ashteret with the vowels from the Hebrew word for shame, boshet , to bring dishonor to the memory of the goddess. This exchanging of vowels formed the word Ashtoreth. The Greek form of the name is Astarte.

In Canaanite mythology, she appears to be the sister of the goddess Anath and the spouse of the god Baal. Anath also was the spouse of Baal, as well as the goddess of love and war. Some confusion, therefore, exists with regards to Ashtaroth's relationship to Anath. Anath and Ashtaroth may have referred to the same goddess, or they may have been two separate deities. Among the people of Palestine, Ashtaroth may have taken over Anath's role. The Egyptians gave the title “Lady of Heaven” to Astarte, Anath, and another goddess, Qudshu. In Moab, Astarte was the spouse of the major god, Chemosh. The Babylonians and Assyrians called her Ashtar and worshiped her as goddess of fertility and love. The people of the Ancient Near East during the Hellenistic and Roman periods referred to her as Aphrodite-Venus.

Apparently, the word “ashtaroth” at one time meant “womb” or “that which comes from the womb.” This word, “ashtaroth,” appears in Deuteronomy 7:13 and Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:51 to describe the young of the flock. This use may demonstrate the link between the goddess Ashtaroth and fertility.

The biblical writers often coupled Baal with Ashtaroth as a designation of pagan worship (Judges 2:13 ; Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3-4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ). In addition to her worship by the Canaanites, the Old Testament mentions the people of Sidon (1 Kings 11:5 ) and the Philistines (1 Samuel 31:10 ) as reverencing her. At Beth-Shan, the Philistines erected a temple to Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:10 ). The reference to the Queen of Heaven (Jeremiah 7:18 ) may have Ashtaroth in mind, but this is uncertain. The Israelites worshiped her, and the biblical writers specifically refer to Solomon's leadership in promoting the worship of Ashtaroth (1 Kings 11:5 ). She was only one of many foreign deities revered by the Israelites. Josiah destroyed the shrines built to her (2 Kings 23:13 ).

2. Egyptian documents dating from the eighteenth century B.C. onward refer to a city called Ashtartu or Ashtarot in the region of Bashan. Joshua 21:27 mentions a city with the name Be-eshterah in Bashan, while a man named Uzzia is called an Ashterathite ( 1 Chronicles 11:44 ). Og, king of Bashan, reigned in the city of Ashtaroth (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 , Joshua 13:12 , Joshua 13:31 ; 1 Chronicles 6:17 ). The sons of Machir received it as a part of their inheritance in the land (Joshua 13:31 ).

Once the city is called Ashteroth-karnaim (Genesis 14:5 ) or “Ashtaroth of the two horns.” A seventeenth century B.C. stone mold for making bronze figurines of Astarte was uncovered at Nahariyah. She was represented as a woman with two horns on her head. Many other clay figurines of Astarte have been found at sites throughout Palestine. The city's name, Ashtaroth, may reflect that she was worshiped by the citizens of this settlement.

The city is located at modern Tel Ashtarah about 20 miles east of the Sea of Galilee. It was located on a major branch of the Via Maris, or Way of the Sea and in the King's Highway, the major highway for traffic east of the Jordan.

Scott Langston



Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ashtaroth, Astaroth
City of Bashan in the kingdom of Og, on the east of the Jordan. It was given to the half-tribe of Manasseh and afterwards devoted to the Levites. Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12,31 ; 1 Chronicles 6:71 : apparently the same as BEESH-TERAH in Joshua 21:27 . Identified with Tell Ashtarah, 32 50' N, 36 1' E .

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth
Goddess of the Phoenicians and Zidonians, worshipped by Israel after the death of Joshua, and by Solomon. Ashtaroth was the chief female goddess and Baal the chief male god, and they are often named together. Josiah destroyed the emblems of her worship as introduced by Solomon. Judges 2:13 ; Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3,4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ; 1 Samuel 31:10 ; 1 Kings 11:5,33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 . Ashtaroth is often called ASTARTE, which is her name in the Greek, and Istar or Ishtar in the Assyrian.

Webster's Dictionary - Ashtaroth
(pl.) of Ashtoreth

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ashtaroth
ASHTAROTH . This city (pl. of Ashtoreth [wh. see]), originally held by Og, king of Bashan ( Deuteronomy 1:4 , Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12 ; Joshua 13:31 ), later captured by the Israelites and by them awarded to the Gershonites ( Joshua 21:27 Be-eshterah , ‘dwelling [or temple] of Ashtoreth’; cf. || 1 Chronicles 6:56 , which reads Ashtaroth ), might, without contradicting Biblical records, be identified with Ashteroth-Karnaim (wh. see). However, a statement found in Eusebius’ Onomasticon favours the view that the names designate two localities. Eusebius relates that there were at his time two villages of the same name, separated by a distance of 9 miles, lying between Adara (Edrei) and Abila; viz., (1) Ashtaroth, the ancient city of Og, 6 miles from Abila, and (2) Karnaim Ashtaroth, a village in the corner of Bashan, where Job’s village is shown (cf. Book of Jubilees 29:10). Eusebius’ Karnaim Ashtaroth evidently lay in the corner or angle formed by the rivers Nahr er-Rukkad and Sharî‘at el-Manadireh , in which vicinity tradition places Uz, Job’s fatherland. At long. 36° E., lat. 32° 50′ N., on the Bashan plateau, stands Tell (‘hill’) ‘Ashtarâ , whose strategical value, as shown by the ruins, was recognized in the Middle Ages. Its base is watered by the Moyet en-Nebî Ayyûb (‘stream of the prophet Job’). Following this rivulet’s course for 2 1 / 2 miles N.N.E., passing through the Hammam Ayyûb (‘Job’s bath’), is found its source, a spring said to have welled forth when Job in his impatience stamped upon the ground. In the immediate vicinity towards the S., Job’s grave is shown. Furthermore, upon the hill at whose base these two places are situated lies the village of Sa‘dîyeh or Sheikh Sa‘d , whose mosque contains the Sakhret Ayyûb , a large basalt boulder against which Job is said to have leant while receiving his friends. Indeed, ¾ of a mile S. of Sa dîyeh at el-Merkez , another grave (modern) of Job is shown, and a Der (‘monastery’) Ayyûb , according to tradition built by the Ghassanide Amr I., is known to have existed. Eusebius’ Ashtaroth must then have been in the proximity of Muzerib , 9 1 /2 miles S. of Sa‘dîyeh , and 8 miles N.W. of Adara, almost the distance of the Onomasticon . Even Tell Ash‘arî , 4 1 /4 miles S. of Tell ‘Ashtarâ , protected on the one side by the Yarmuk, on the second by a chasm, and showing evidences of having been fortified by a triple wall on the third, is admirably situated for a royal stronghold.

None of these modern place-names, with the exception of Tell ‘Ashtarâ , is linguistically related to the ‘Ashtaroth and ‘Ashteroth-karnaim of the Bible and the Onomasticon . The description of ‘Ashteroth-karnaim ( 2Ma 12:21 f., cf. 1Ma 5:43 ) as a place hard to besiege and difficult of access because of numerous passes leading to it, in whose territory a temple was situated, is applicable to Sa‘dîyeh or to Tell ‘Ashtarâ or even to Tell Ash‘arî , whose double peak at the S. summit is partly responsible for the translation of the name ‘Ashtaroth of (near) the double peak’ (see Ashtoreth). The similarity of name between Tell ‘Ashtarâ and ‘Ashteroth-karnaim , even though Tell ‘Ashtarâ does not lie directly between Adara and Abila, and lacks, with the other places, narrow passes, would favour the identification of ‘Ashteroth-karnaim with Tell ‘Ashtarâ , and hence, according to the distances of Eusebius, the location of ‘Ashtaroth near Muzerib . However, until the ancient name of Muzerib is known, and the various sites excavated, a definite determination of the location of these cities, and even of the difference between them, must remain impossible.

N. Koenig.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Ashtaroth
Ashtoreth
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Ashtaroth
or ASTARTE, a goddess of the Zidonians. The word Ashtaroth properly signifies flocks of sheep, or goats; and sometimes the grove, or woods, because she was goddess of woods, and groves were her temples. In groves consecrated to her, such lasciviousness was committed as rendered her worship infamous. She was also called the queen of heaven; and sometimes her worship is said to be that of "the host of heaven." She was certainly represented in the same manner as Isis, with cows' horns on her head, to denote the increase and decrease of the moon. Cicero calls her the fourth Venus of the Syrians. She is almost always joined with Baal, and is called a god, the Scriptures having no particular word to express a goddess. It is believed that the moon was adored in this idol. Her temples generally accompanied those of the sun; and while bloody sacrifices of human victims were offered to Baal, bread, liquors, and perfumes were presented to Astarte. For her, tables were prepared upon the flat terrace roofs of houses, near gates, in porches, and at cross- ways, on the first day of every month; and this was called by the Greeks, Hecate's supper.

Solomon, seduced by his foreign wives, introduced the worship of Ashtaroth into Israel; but Jezebel, daughter of the king of Tyre, and wife to Ahab, principally established her worship. She caused altars to be erected to this idol in every part of Israel; and at one time four hundred priests attended the worship of Ashtaroth, 1 Kings 18:7 .

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ashtaroth
Ashtaroth (ăsh'ta-rŏth), Astaroth (ăs'-tâ-rŏth). 1. A city of Bashan, east of the Jordan, Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 9:10; Joshua 13:31; the same as Beesh-terah, Joshua 21:27; probably Tell-Ashterah, in Jaulan. 2. Ashtoreth, sing.; Ashtaroth, plur. and more usual. An idol called the goddess of the Sidonians, Judges 2:13, much worshipped in Syria and Phœnicia. Solomon introduced the worship of it. 1 Kings 11:33. The Greeks and Romans called it Astarte. The 400 prophets of the Asherah which ate at Jezebel's table, mentioned 1 Kings 18:19, R. V., were probably employed in the service of Asherah, the female deity. The worship of Ashtoreth was suppressed by Josiah. The goddess was called the "queen of heaven," and the worship was said to be paid to the "host of heaven." Her name is usually mentioned in connection with Baal. Baal and Ashtoreth are taken by many scholars as standing for the sun and the moon respectively.

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ashtoreth, Ashtaroth
In the Hebrew language, Ashtaroth was the plural form of Ashtoreth. The Ashtaroth were among the Canaanite and Phoenician goddesses that proved to be such a temptation to the Israelites. Although a Baal was a male god and an Ashtoreth a female god, the two are often linked to represent the religion commonly known as Baalism (Judges 2:13; 1 Samuel 12:10; 1 Kings 11:6). For details see BAAL.

Sentence search

Beeshterah - (bee ehssh' tih rah) Place name meaning, “in Ashtaroth” or representing a contraction of “Beth Ashtaroth,” which means, “house of Ashtaroth. 1 Chronicles 6:71 spells name “Ashtaroth. ” See Ashtaroth
Beeshterah - It is also called Ashtaroth, 1 Chronicles 6:71 , and is perhaps a contraction of Beth-Ashtaroth
Ashtaroth - Ashtaroth or ASTAROTH. of Jordan, called so from being a seat of Ashtoreth's worship, "Og dwelt in Ashtaroth, in Edrei" (Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 12:4; Joshua 13:12-31; Joshua 9:10). Beth Ashterah, "the house of Ashtaroth. ") Between Adara and Abila (according to Eusebius and-Jerome) lay two villages, probably the one Ashtaroth, the other Ashteroth-Karnaim
Astaroth - See Ashtaroth
Ashtoreth - See Ashtaroth
Astaroth - See Ashtaroth
Beeshtera - (See Ashtaroth
as'Taroth - (1:4) [Ashtaroth ]
be-Eshterah - See Ashtaroth
Karnaim - The same as Ashteroth-karnaim and Ashtaroth. See Ashtaroth ; Lo-Debar (for the details of the word play)
Ashteroth Karnaim - (assh' tih rahth-kahr' naw ihm) See Ashtaroth
Ashte'Rathite, - a native or inhabitant of Ashtaroth, (1 Chronicles 11:44 ) beyond Jordan
Eshtarah - REB reads “Be-Ashtaroth
Ashtaroth - The Old Testament uses the plural form, Ashtaroth, more than the singular form, Ashtoreth. Some confusion, therefore, exists with regards to Ashtaroth's relationship to Anath. Anath and Ashtaroth may have referred to the same goddess, or they may have been two separate deities. Among the people of Palestine, Ashtaroth may have taken over Anath's role. ... Apparently, the word “Ashtaroth” at one time meant “womb” or “that which comes from the womb. ” This word, “Ashtaroth,” appears in Deuteronomy 7:13 and Deuteronomy 28:4 ,Deuteronomy 28:4,28:18 ,Deuteronomy 28:18,28:51 to describe the young of the flock. This use may demonstrate the link between the goddess Ashtaroth and fertility. ... The biblical writers often coupled Baal with Ashtaroth as a designation of pagan worship (Judges 2:13 ; Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3-4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ). At Beth-Shan, the Philistines erected a temple to Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:10 ). The reference to the Queen of Heaven (Jeremiah 7:18 ) may have Ashtaroth in mind, but this is uncertain. The Israelites worshiped her, and the biblical writers specifically refer to Solomon's leadership in promoting the worship of Ashtaroth (1 Kings 11:5 ). Og, king of Bashan, reigned in the city of Ashtaroth (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 12:4 , Joshua 13:12 , Joshua 13:31 ; 1 Chronicles 6:17 ). ... Once the city is called Ashteroth-karnaim (Genesis 14:5 ) or “Ashtaroth of the two horns. The city's name, Ashtaroth, may reflect that she was worshiped by the citizens of this settlement
Uzzia - Of David's valiant men of the guard; of Ashtaroth beyond Jordan (1 Chronicles 11:44)
Ashtoreth, Ashtaroth - In the Hebrew language, Ashtaroth was the plural form of Ashtoreth. The Ashtaroth were among the Canaanite and Phoenician goddesses that proved to be such a temptation to the Israelites
Uzzi'a - (strength of Jehovah ), one of David's guard, and apparently a native of Ashtaroth beyond Jordan
Queen of Heaven, - (Jeremiah 7:18 ; 45:17,18,19,25 ) is the moon Ashtaroth or Astarte to whom worshiped as Hebrew women offered cakes in the streets of Jerusalem
Beeshterah - It would appear by comparing 1 Chronicles 6:71 to be the same as Ashtaroth
Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth - Ashtaroth was the chief female goddess and Baal the chief male god, and they are often named together. Ashtaroth is often called ASTARTE, which is her name in the Greek, and Istar or Ishtar in the Assyrian
be-Esh-Terah - ( Joshua 21:27 ) Probably identical with Ashtaroth
Ashtaroth - Ashtaroth . || 1 Chronicles 6:56 , which reads Ashtaroth ), might, without contradicting Biblical records, be identified with Ashteroth-Karnaim (wh. , (1) Ashtaroth, the ancient city of Og, 6 miles from Abila, and (2) Karnaim Ashtaroth, a village in the corner of Bashan, where Job’s village is shown (cf. Eusebius’ Karnaim Ashtaroth evidently lay in the corner or angle formed by the rivers Nahr er-Rukkad and Sharî‘at el-Manadireh , in which vicinity tradition places Uz, Job’s fatherland. Eusebius’ Ashtaroth must then have been in the proximity of Muzerib , 9 1 /2 miles S. ... None of these modern place-names, with the exception of Tell ‘Ashtarâ , is linguistically related to the ‘Ashtaroth and ‘Ashteroth-karnaim of the Bible and the Onomasticon . summit is partly responsible for the translation of the name ‘Ashtaroth of (near) the double peak’ (see Ashtoreth). The similarity of name between Tell ‘Ashtarâ and ‘Ashteroth-karnaim , even though Tell ‘Ashtarâ does not lie directly between Adara and Abila, and lacks, with the other places, narrow passes, would favour the identification of ‘Ashteroth-karnaim with Tell ‘Ashtarâ , and hence, according to the distances of Eusebius, the location of ‘Ashtaroth near Muzerib
Ashteroth Karnaim - It may be identified with Ashtaroth preceding; called "Karnaim", i
Ashtaroth - Ashtaroth (ăsh'ta-rŏth), Astaroth (ăs'-tâ-rŏth). ; Ashtaroth, plur
Ashtaroth - The word Ashtaroth properly signifies flocks of sheep, or goats; and sometimes the grove, or woods, because she was goddess of woods, and groves were her temples. ... Solomon, seduced by his foreign wives, introduced the worship of Ashtaroth into Israel; but Jezebel, daughter of the king of Tyre, and wife to Ahab, principally established her worship. She caused altars to be erected to this idol in every part of Israel; and at one time four hundred priests attended the worship of Ashtaroth, 1 Kings 18:7
Ashtaroth - , "the house of Ashtaroth
Ashteroth-Karnaim - For interpretation of name see Ashtoreth, and for location, Ashtaroth
Sab'Aoth, the Lord of, - Molech, Ashtaroth and other false gods
Og - Ashtaroth-carnaim and Edrei were his chief cities; but there were many other walled towns, and the land was rich in flocks and herds
Bashan - The territory was given to the half-tribe of Manasseh, with a reservation of two cities, Golan and Be-eshterah (Ashtaroth in 1 Chronicles 6:71 ), for the Gershonite Levites ( Joshua 21:27 ). It included Salecah ( Salkhat , on the borders of the desert), Edrei ( ed-Der‘a ?), Ashtaroth (perhaps Tell Ashareh ), and Golan, one of the cities of refuge, the name of which may be preserved in the Jaulan , the region immediately east of the Sea of Tiberias
Asherah - See Ashtaroth
Ahab - He married Jezebel, the daughter of Ethbaal, king of Zidon, who introduced the whole abominations and idols of her country, Baal and Ashtaroth
Ashtoreth - These names often occur in the plural (Ashtaroth, Baalim), probably as indicating either different statues or different modifications of the deities
Og - His rule extended over sixty cities, of which the two chief were Ashtaroth and Edrei ( Joshua 12:4 )
Bethshean - Hence the latter fastened Saul's body to the wall of Bethshean, and put his armor in the house of Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:10; 1 Samuel 31:12)
Bashan - This Bashan region included within it sixty cities, the most important of which were Edrei, Ashtaroth and Golan (Deuteronomy 3:4; Joshua 12:4-5; Joshua 21:27)
Bashan - " Ashtaroth (Beeshterah, Joshua 21:27, compare 1 Chronicles 6:71), Golan (a city of refuge, assigned with Ashtaroth to the Gershomite Levites), Edrei, Salkah, were the chief cities
Ashtoreth - In Bashan, the cities Ashtaroth or Be-eshterah and Ashteroth-karnaim presumably derived their names from the fact that various Ashtoreth-cults were located there. At Ashteroth-karnaim (‘horned Ashtaroth’) one might even be justified in supposing from the name that ‘Ashtoreth was represented with the horns of a cow or a ram. ‘Ashtaroth , Judges 2:13 ; Jdg 10:6 , 1 Samuel 7:13 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ); in Syria, ‘Atbar, and in Phœnicia, ‘Astart, whence the Hebrew ‘Ashtoreth, with the vowels of bôsheth (‘shameful thing’) substituted for the original
Bashan - Its principal cities were Ashtaroth (or Beeshterah) given to the Levites, Golan a 'city of refuge,' Edrei, and Salcah on its border
Philistines - The Philistines were idolaters and worshipped Dagon, Ashtaroth and Baal-zebub
Ashtoreth - By the plural (Ashtaroth, Baalim: Judges 10:6; 1 Samuel 7:4) different phases of the same deity, according to the different places of worship, are indicated
Ahaziah - Ahaziah imitated his father's impieties, 1 Kings 22:52 , &c, and paid his adorations to Baal and Ashtaroth, the worship of whom had been introduced into Israel by Jezebel his mother
Baal - Goddesses were known as Ashtaroth (plural of Ashtoreth; Judges 2:13; 1 Samuel 7:3-4; 1 Samuel 12:10) or Asherim (plural of Asherah; 1 Kings 15:13; 1 Kings 18:19; 2 Kings 23:4). A locality may also have been named after the Ashtaroth (Joshua 12:4)
Beth-Shean - ), the bodies of Saul and his sons were hung on the walls of Beth-shean, where a temple to the Ashtaroth was located
Asherah - The King James Version translated Asherah “grove” and the proper noun “Ashtaroth
jo'Ash - For at least twenty-three years, while Jehoiada lived, his reign was very prosperous; but after the death of Jehoiada, Joash fell into the hands of bad advisers, at whose suggestion he revived the worship of Baal and Ashtaroth
False Worship - ” The most consistent problem with false worship seen in the Old Testament is with the nature or fertility deities—Baals and Ashtaroth, Anath, Astarte—the male and female representations of reproduction and growth. Native national gods and fertility deities similar to Baal and Ashtaroth of the Old Testament period still abounded
Goat - It is well known that Baal-peor and Ashtaroth were worshipped with unclean rites, and that public prostitution formed a grand part of the worship of many deities among the Egyptians, Moabites, Canaanites, &c
Damascus - Both major international highways ran through Damascus the Via Maris from Mesopotamia in the east through Damascus and the Jezreel Valley to the Plain of Sharon and the Mediterranean coast, then south to Egypt; and the King's Highway from Damascus south through Ashtaroth, Rabbath-ammon, and Bozrah to Elath on the Red Sea and to Arabia
Idol, Idolatry - They forsook the Lord God of their fathers, and served Baal and Ashtaroth," Judges 2:11,12
Philis'Tines - (1 Samuel 31:9 ) The gods whom they chiefly worshipped were Dagon, (Judges 16:23 ; 1 Samuel 5:3-5 ; 1 Chronicles 10:10 ) 1 Maccabees 10:83 , Ashtaroth, (1 Samuel 31:10 ) Herod
Samuel - Then Samuel again appears and exhorts Israel, now lamenting after the Lord, to "put away" their idols and "Ashtaroth" in particular (each man besides general sins has his particular besetting sin), and to "return unto Jehovah with all their hearts
Zedekiah - Zedekiah therefore was one of the "400 prophets of the GROVES" , (Asheerah Ashtaroth) who apparently were not slain when Elijah slew the 450 prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:19; 1 Kings 18:22; 1 Kings 18:24), or rather a prophet of the calves symbolizing "Jehovah," for they spoke in Jehovah's name (1 Kings 22:8)
Philistia - They carried their idols with them in war (2 Samuel 5:21), and published their triumphs in the house of their gods; these were Dagon (Judges 16:23) , Ashtaroth (1 Samuel 31:9-10), Baalzebub (2 Kings 1:2-6), and Derceto (Diod
Gods, Pagan - Ishtar (the Canaanite Astarte/Ashtaroth) was goddess of the morning and evening star. Astarte (a Greek form of the name) appears in the Old Testament in the singular as “Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Zidonians” (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ) as well as in the plural form, Ashtaroth (Judges 10:6 , 1 Samuel 7:4 ; 1 Samuel 12:10 ), representing local manifestations of the godess
Ebla - Biblical place names such as Salim, Hazor, Lachish, Megiddo, Gaza, Dor, Sinai, Ashtaroth, and Joppa seemingly appear repeatedly in the Ebla texts
Ebla - Biblical place names such as Salim, Hazor, Lachish, Megiddo, Gaza, Dor, Sinai, Ashtaroth, and Joppa seemingly appear repeatedly in the Ebla texts
Sol'Omon - Before long the priests and prophets had to grieve over rival temples to Molech, Chemosh, Ashtaroth and forms of ritual not idolatrous only, but cruel, dark, impure
Jephthah - Meantime, through Jehovah's anger at Israel's apostasy to Baalim, Ashtaroth, the gods of Ammon, etc, he sold them (compare Romans 7:14, gave them up to the wages that their sin had earned) into the hands of those very people whose gods they chose (Judges 10:7; Judges 10:17-18), the instrument of their sin being made the instrument of their punishment (Proverbs 1:31; Jeremiah 2:19)
Babylon, History And Religion of - Ishtar, the Canaanite Astarte/Ashtaroth (Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3-4 ; 1 Kings 11:5 ), had a major temple in Babylon and was very popular as the “Queen of Heaven” (Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17-19 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - ... Asherah was one of the three chief consort-goddesses within the Canaanite pantheon, along with Astarte (or Ashtaroth) and Anath
Assyria, History And Religion of - Ishtar, the Canaanite Astarte/Ashtaroth (Judges 10:6 ; 1 Samuel 7:3-4 ; 1 Kings 11:5 ), was very popular as the “Queen of Heaven” (Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17-19 ,Jeremiah 44:17-19,44:25 ) and served as the patron goddess of Nineveh
Judges (1) - The following is an outline of the contents of these chapters: ... There is, first of all, an introduction (Judges 2:6 to Judges 3:6 ) which contains a brief but comprehensive résumé of the period about to be dealt with; as long as Joshua was alive, it says, the children of Israel remained faithful to Jahweh; but after his death, and after the generation that knew him had passed away, the people for sook Jahweh, the God of their fathers, and served Baal and Ashtaroth; the consequence was that they were oppressed by the surrounding nations
Jews - For many ages they had enjoyed little prosperity, and often relapsed into awful idolatry, worshipping Baalim, Ashtaroth