Places Study on Ashkelon

Places Study on Ashkelon

Judges 14: And the Spirit of the LORD came upon him, and he went down to Ashkelon, and slew thirty men of them, and took their spoil, and gave change of garments unto them which expounded the riddle. And his anger was kindled, and he went up to his father's house.
Jeremiah 25: And all the mingled people, and all the kings of the land of Uz, and all the kings of the land of the Philistines, and Ashkelon, and Azzah, and Ekron, and the remnant of Ashdod,
Jeremiah 47: Baldness is come upon Gaza; Ashkelon is cut off with the remnant of their valley: how long wilt thou cut thyself?
Jeremiah 47: How can it be quiet, seeing the LORD hath given it a charge against Ashkelon, and against the sea shore? there hath he appointed it.
Amos 1: And I will cut off the inhabitant from Ashdod, and him that holdeth the sceptre from Ashkelon, and I will turn mine hand against Ekron: and the remnant of the Philistines shall perish, saith the Lord GOD.
Zephaniah 2: For Gaza shall be forsaken, and Ashkelon a desolation: they shall drive out Ashdod at the noon day, and Ekron shall be rooted up.
Zephaniah 2: And the coast shall be for the remnant of the house of Judah; they shall feed thereupon: in the houses of Ashkelon shall they lie down in the evening: for the LORD their God shall visit them, and turn away their captivity.
Zechariah 9: Ashkelon shall see it, and fear; Gaza also shall see it, and be very sorrowful, and Ekron; for her expectation shall be ashamed; and the king shall perish from Gaza, and Ashkelon shall not be inhabited.

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ashkelon
=Askelon=Ascalon, was one of the five cities of the Philistines (Joshua 13:3 ; 1 Samuel 6:17 ). It stood on the shore of the Mediterranean, 12 miles north of Gaza. It is mentioned on an inscription at Karnak in Egypt as having been taken by king Rameses II., the oppressor of the Hebrews. In the time of the judges (Judges 1:18 ) it fell into the possession of the tribe of Judah; but it was soon after retaken by the Philistines (2 Samuel 1:20 ), who were not finally dispossessed till the time of Alexander the Great. Samson went down to this place from Timnath, and slew thirty men and took their spoil. The prophets foretold its destruction (Jeremiah 25:20 ; 47:5,7 ). It became a noted place in the Middle Ages, having been the scene of many a bloody battle between the Saracens and the Crusaders. It was beseiged and taken by Richard the Lion-hearted, and "within its walls and towers now standing he held his court." Among the Tell Amarna tablets (see EGYPT ) are found letters or official despatches from Yadaya, "captain of horse and dust of the king's feet," to the "great king" of Egypt, dated from Ascalon. It is now called 'Askalan.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ashkelon
Askelon, Ascalon. One of the five Philistine lords' cities (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17). Remote in the S. on the coast of the Mediterranean, so less brought into contact with the Jews; omitted in the towns allotted to Judah (Joshua 15; but compare Judges 1:18). Gaza was still more S., but on the main road from Egypt to Palestine. Samson slew thirty of the Ashkelonites, took their spoil, and gave change of raiment unto them of Timhath who expounded his riddle (Judges 14:19). Later, the temple and lake of Derceto (with a female head and bust and fish's fail, like Dagon), the Syrian Venus, stood near it. Here Julian cruelly persecuted the Christians. Its name still appears in our "eschalot" or" shallot," an onion for which it was famous, as for its figs, olives, etc. Within the walls, of which the ruins still stand, Richard I held his court in the crusades.

After the brilliant battle here the crusaders would have taken the city, but for Count Raymond's jealousy; and for long Ashkelon was a thorn to the Christian kingdom. The Mahometans call it "the bride of Syria." In the Sam. version of Genesis 20:1-2; Genesis 26:1, Ashkelon stands instead of Gerar; and curiously tradition in Origen's time pointed out wells there as those dug by Isaac. The city stands on the very shore of the Mediterranean, its walls were along the ridge of rock sweeping round inland in continuation of the shore cliffs. Conder (Pal. Expl., July, 1875) thinks that the Ashkelon of the Bible, of Herod, and of the crusaders, is one and the same town on the seashore, distinguished from another early Christian inland Ashkelon by the title Ascalon Maiumas. Maiumas, "watering place," applies not to a port only, but to any place abounding in water. But Ashkelon and its port town of Maiumas were distinct, as a bishop of each signed the acts of the Council of Constantinople, A.D. 536. The present Ashkelon is the Maiumas of Ascalon; the original Ashkelon was probably inland, and is now buried in sand. (Pusey.)

Holman Bible Dictionary - Ashkelon
(assh' kih lahn) One of five principal cities of the Philistines (pentapolis), located on the Mediterranean coast on the trade route, Via Maris, and designated for Judah in the conquest. Ashkelon was a Mediterranean coastal city twelve miles north of Gaza and ten miles south of Ashdod. It is the only Philistine city directly on the seacoast. Its history extends into the Neolithic Period. The economic importance came from both its port and its location on the trade route, the Via Maris.

The location in southern Palestine put Ashkelon under considerable Egyptian influence throughout much of its history. The first mention of the city was in the nineteenth century B.C. Execration Texts, where a curse on the ruler and his supporters was written on pottery, then smashed, symbolizing breaking his power. A fifteenth century B.C. papyrus speaks of Ashkelon's loyalty to Egypt, and the fourteenth century Amarna Letters confirm that relationship with the ruler Widia claiming submission to the Pharaoh, although the ruler of Jerusalem claimed that Ashkelon had given supplies to the “Apiru. In this period the goddess Astarte was worshiped here by the Canaanites. The city revolted from Egypt and was subsequently sacked by Ramses II (1282 B.C.). Later that same century Pharaoh Merneptah captured the city.

The Old Testament record concerns the city after it had come under Philistine control. It was ruled by a ruler or seren supported by a military aristocracy. Joshua had not taken Ashkelon in the conquest of the land ( Joshua 13:3 ), but it was included in the territory designated for Judah. It appears that Judah did take the city (Judges 1:18 ), but it belonged to the Philistines in the Samson account (Judges 14:19 ) and under Saul and David (1 Samuel 6:17 ; 2 Samuel 1:20 ). Ashkelon subsequently was independent or under the control of Assyria, Egypt, Babylon, and Tyre. Amos 1:8 and Jeremiah 47:5 , Jeremiah 47:7 refer to Ashkelon and her evils. With the coming of the Greeks, Ashkelon became a Hellenistic center of culture and learning. During the Maccabean Period the city flourished and apparently did not have hostilities with the Jews ( 1 Maccabees 10:36 ; 1 Maccabees 11:60 ). In fact, many Jews lived there. Rome granted the status “free allied city” in 104 B.C. A tradition was known in Christian circles that Herod the Great was born in Ashkelon, the son of a temple slave of Apollo. Herod did have family and friends there and gave the city some beautiful buildings, built a palace there, and left the city to his sister, Salome, at his death. The city was attacked by the Jews in the first Roman Revolt (66 A.D.) but survived and was faithful to Rome. It later became a Christian city, conquered by the Moslems in the seventh century, taken by the Crusaders, retaken by Saladin in 1187, and ultimately systematically destroyed by the Mameluke Beibars in 1270.

One of the earliest modern attempts at archaeology in Palestine took place in Ashkelon in 1815 when Lady Hester Stanhope did some digging and uncovered a huge statue of Zeus which subsequently she ordered destroyed (some say to avoid charges of stealing antiquities, others say to discover hidden treasure). Serious work was begun by John Garstang and the Palestine Exploration Society. The site has provided excellent materials of the Philistine period and especially was productive of Hellenistic and Roman occupation. George W. Knight



Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ashkelon, Askelon
One of the five principal cities of the Philistines. It fell to the lot of Judah, who took Askelon and the coasts thereof, Judges 1:18 , but they did not really subdue it, for it was in the hands of the Philistines when Samson, with the Spirit of the Lord upon him, slew thirty men in the city and took their spoil, Judges 14:19 , and that it remained so we see from 1 Samuel 6:17 , and 2 Samuel 1:20 . The judgements of God were denounced against this city, Jeremiah 25:20 ; Jeremiah 47:5,7 ; Amos 1:8 ; Zechariah 9:5 ; and the remnant of Judah should dwell there. Zephaniah 2:4,7 .

The city was situated on the sea coast, midway between Gaza and Ashdod: it is now called Askulan or Askalan, 31 40' N. In modern times the city was held by the Crusaders, and within its walls Richard of England held his court: the walls which this king aided with his own hands to repair may, it is thought, still be traced, and masses of masonry and broken columns of granite still lie about. By the Mahometan geographers it was called the Bride of Syria.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ashkelon
ASHKELON (Greek Ascalon ). A city of the Philistine Pentapolis. It is mentioned several times in the Tell el-Amarna correspondence. According to Joshua 13:3 , it was left unconquered; but the interpolated passage, Judges 1:18 , enumerates it among the places captured by Israel. It is doubtful whether Samson took the spoil with which he paid his wages ( Judges 14:19 ) from this city, which is two days’ journey from Timnath, or from a similarly styled village, much nearer at hand, now possibly represented in name by Khurbet ‘Askalan , near Tell Zakariya . It is referred to in the story of the return of the ark ( 1 Samuel 6:17 ), and in David’s lament ( 2 Samuel 1:20 ), and with the other Philistine cities is made an object of denunciation by various prophets. Here Jonathan Maccabæus was honourably received ( 1Ma 10:86 ; 1Ma 11:60 ), and it was the birthplace of Herod the Great. It was captured by the Crusaders, but recaptured by the Muslims after the battle of Hattin. Extensive remains of ancient buildings still exist on the site, which retains the name of ‘Askalan : numerous fragments of statues etc., are found by the natives from time to time.

R. A. S. Macalister.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ashkelon
Ashkelon (ăsh'ke-lŏn), and Askelon (ăs'ke-lŏn), migration. One of the five cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles north of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7. Ashkelon was the seat of worship of the Philistine goddess Astarte, whose temple was plundered by the Scythians, b.c. 625; was the birthplace of Herod the Great. Ashkelon is noticed in the Tel-el-Amarna tablets, 1480-1450 B. C, as worshippers of Dagon

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ashkelon
The ancient town of Ashkelon has passed on its name to successive settlements on the same site down to the present day. It is situated in the south of Palestine on the Mediterranean coast, and in Old Testament times was one of the ‘five cities of the Philistines’. It was the Philistines’ only port (Joshua 13:3; Amos 1:8; Jeremiah 47:7).

At the time of Joshua’s invasion of Canaan, the Israelites captured Ashkelon (Judges 1:18), but the Philistines soon regained it. It remained one of their important towns during the time of their hostility to Israel prior to the reign of David (Judges 14:19; 1 Samuel 6:17-18). After David broke their power, the Philistines lived alongside the Israelites without any major conflicts.

Though in many ways subservient to Israelite rulers, Ashkelon and neighbouring towns were still regarded as belonging to the Philistines. At times they suffered from the attacks of various invaders (Jeremiah 47:5; Zephaniah 2:4). In spite of this interference, Ashkelon was still standing in New Testament times. It was well known as the birthplace of Herod the Great, and benefited from his building projects. (See also PHILISTIA.)

Sentence search

Askelon - Alternate KJV spelling of Ashkelon. See Ashkelon
Eshkalonite - (ehssh' kuh lahn ite) Citizen of Ashkelon. See Ashkelon
as'Calon - [Ashkelon ]
Askelon - See Ashkelon
Ascalon - See Ashkelon
Ash'Kelon, as'Kelon - Samson went down from Timnath to Ashkelon. (Judges 14:19 ) In the post-biblical times Ashkelon rose to considerable importance. Ashkelon played a memorable part in the struggles of the Crusades
Esh'Kalonites, the - (Joshua 13:3 ) [Ashkelon ]
Eshkalonites - Inhabitants of Ashkelon
Ashkelon - Ashkelon (ăsh'ke-lŏn), and Askelon (ăs'ke-lŏn), migration. Ashkelon was the seat of worship of the Philistine goddess Astarte, whose temple was plundered by the Scythians, b. Ashkelon is noticed in the Tel-el-Amarna tablets, 1480-1450 B
Ashkelon - Samson slew thirty of the Ashkelonites, took their spoil, and gave change of raiment unto them of Timhath who expounded his riddle (Judges 14:19). ... After the brilliant battle here the crusaders would have taken the city, but for Count Raymond's jealousy; and for long Ashkelon was a thorn to the Christian kingdom. version of Genesis 20:1-2; Genesis 26:1, Ashkelon stands instead of Gerar; and curiously tradition in Origen's time pointed out wells there as those dug by Isaac. , July, 1875) thinks that the Ashkelon of the Bible, of Herod, and of the crusaders, is one and the same town on the seashore, distinguished from another early Christian inland Ashkelon by the title Ascalon Maiumas. But Ashkelon and its port town of Maiumas were distinct, as a bishop of each signed the acts of the Council of Constantinople, A. The present Ashkelon is the Maiumas of Ascalon; the original Ashkelon was probably inland, and is now buried in sand
Ashkelon - The ancient town of Ashkelon has passed on its name to successive settlements on the same site down to the present day. ... At the time of Joshua’s invasion of Canaan, the Israelites captured Ashkelon (Judges 1:18), but the Philistines soon regained it. ... Though in many ways subservient to Israelite rulers, Ashkelon and neighbouring towns were still regarded as belonging to the Philistines. In spite of this interference, Ashkelon was still standing in New Testament times
Ashkelon - Ashkelon was a Mediterranean coastal city twelve miles north of Gaza and ten miles south of Ashdod. ... The location in southern Palestine put Ashkelon under considerable Egyptian influence throughout much of its history. papyrus speaks of Ashkelon's loyalty to Egypt, and the fourteenth century Amarna Letters confirm that relationship with the ruler Widia claiming submission to the Pharaoh, although the ruler of Jerusalem claimed that Ashkelon had given supplies to the “Apiru. Joshua had not taken Ashkelon in the conquest of the land ( Joshua 13:3 ), but it was included in the territory designated for Judah. Ashkelon subsequently was independent or under the control of Assyria, Egypt, Babylon, and Tyre. Amos 1:8 and Jeremiah 47:5 , Jeremiah 47:7 refer to Ashkelon and her evils. With the coming of the Greeks, Ashkelon became a Hellenistic center of culture and learning. A tradition was known in Christian circles that Herod the Great was born in Ashkelon, the son of a temple slave of Apollo. ... One of the earliest modern attempts at archaeology in Palestine took place in Ashkelon in 1815 when Lady Hester Stanhope did some digging and uncovered a huge statue of Zeus which subsequently she ordered destroyed (some say to avoid charges of stealing antiquities, others say to discover hidden treasure)
Migdal-Gad - of Ashkelon
Gaza - The other four were Gath, Ashdod, Ashkelon and Ekron (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18)
Merneptah - The stele praises Merneptah's conquest of Canaan, Ashkelon, Gezer, Yanoam, and Israel, Israel being marked as a people rather than a geographical place
Ashdod - Ashdod was one of the ‘five cities of the Philistines’, the other four being Ashkelon, Ekron, Gaza and Gath (Joshua 13:3; 1 Samuel 6:17-18; see PHILISTIA)
Lords of the Philistines - The chieftains or ‘tyrants’ of the five Philistine cities, Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath
Atargatis - Derceto) at Carnion ( 2Ma 12:26 ), other shrines were situated at Hierapolis and Ashkelon
Philistim - "Baldness is come upon Gaza; Ashkelon is cut off with the remnant of their valley," Jeremiah 47:5 . And I will cut off the inhabitant from Ashdod, and him that holdeth the sceptre from Ashkelon; and I will turn my hand against Ekron; and the remnant of the Philistines shall perish, saith the Lord God," Amos 1:6-8 . "For Ashkelon shall be a desolation;" it shall be cut off with the remnant of the valley; "and Ekron shall be rooted up. "The king shall perish from Gaza, and Ashkelon shall not be inhabited," Zechariah 9:5 . " "The sea coast, by which it was formerly washed, is every day removing farther from the deserted ruins of Ashkelon. "Ashkelon," says Richardson, "was one of the proudest satrapies of the lords of the Philistines: now there is not an inhabitant within its walls; and the prophecy of Zechariah is fulfilled: ‘The king shall perish from Gaza, and Ashkelon shall not be inhabited. The lofty towers of Ashkelon lie scattered on the ground, and the ruins within its walls do not shelter a human being. It was one of the chief cities of the Philistines; but, though Gaza still subsists, and while Ashkelon and Ashdod retain their names in their ruins, the very name of Ekron is missing
Ashkelon - Ashkelon (Greek Ascalon )
Dagon - A god whose worship was general among the Philistines (at Gaza, Judges 16:23 , 1Ma 10:83-84 ; 1Ma 11:4 ; at Ashkelon, 1 Samuel 5:2 ; prob
Philistines, the - Politically, the Philistines had a highly organized city-state system comprised of five towns in southwest Palestine: Ashdod, Gaza, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (1 Samuel 6:17 ). Apparently, the Philistines had Ashtoreth temples at Beth-shan (1 Samuel 31:10 NIV) and, according to Herodotus, at Ashkelon (Herodotus 1:105). A new series of excavations is under way at Ashkelon. See Gaza , Gath , Ekron , Ashdod , Ashkelon
Lord - , Gath, Ashdod, Gaza, Ashkelon, and Ekron
Sennacherib - Took Ashkelon, warred with Egypt, took Libnah and Lachish on the frontier; and having made treaty with Sabacus or So (the clay seal of So found in Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik was probably attached to this treaty), he marched against Hezekaih of Judah who had thrown off tribute and intermeddled in the politics of Philistine cities against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13). ... Sennacherib gave part of Judah's territory to Ashdod, Ekron, Gaza, and Ashkelon
Gath - In addition to Gath, the other towns of the Philistine city-state system were Ekron, Ashdod, Ashkelon and Gaza (1 Samuel 6:17 ). In other words, Ekron, Ashdod, Ashkelon, and Gaza were, in a sense, satellite cities of Gath
Philistines - The five fortified cities of the Philistines, with their 'daughters' or dependent villages, were Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron
Sennacherib - Ashkelon and Ekron were captured, and Hezekiah had to restore Padi to the throne of Ekron after keeping him some time in prison
Philistines - They occupied the five cities of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath, in the south-western corner of Canaan, which belonged to Egypt up to the closing days of the Nineteenth Dynasty
Gaza - It was the southernmost town of the Philistine city-state system which also included Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath (1 Samuel 6:17 )
Philistia - (Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47), a confederacy of the five cities (originally Canaanite) Gaza (the leading one), Ashdod, Ashkelon, Gath, and Ekron (always put last). 4:603) term Gaza and Ashkelon "Egyptian cities. Sennacherib took Ashkelon, and gave part of Hezekiah's land as a reward to Ashdod, Gaza, and Ekron for their submission (Rawlinson 1:477)
Philistines - Down to this time Philistine power was concentrated in the hands of the rulers of the five cities of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath. There was also at Ashkelon a temple of Ashtart (Herod
Ashdod - ... Asdod was ten miles north of Ashkelon and two and a half miles east of the Mediterranean Sea on the Philistine plain
Philistines - Their state was divided into five little principalities, at the head of each of which was a "lord," namely, Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Gath, and Ekron-and they oppressed Israel during the government of the high-priest Eli, that of Samuel, and during the reign of Saul, for about one hundred and twenty years
Tiglath-Pileser - Mitinti of Ashkelon, seeing the fate of Rezin of Damascus, seems to have gone mad
Ashtoreth - In her temple at Ashkelon, the Philistines hung the armour of Saul ( 1 Samuel 31:10 )
Sychar - There is a parallel in the case of’ Ashkelon, mod
Philis'Tines - (Joshua 15:2,12,45-47 ) No portion of it, however, was conquered in the lifetime of Joshua, (Joshua 13:2 ) and even after his death no permanent conquest was effected, (Judges 3:3 ) though we are informed that the three cities of Gaza, Ashkelon and Ekron were taken
Judah, Tribe And Kingdom - For towns on the coastal plain see ASHDOD; Ashkelon; EKRON; GATH; GAZA
Pharaoh - In the inscription the name of the Israelites has no determinative of 'country' or 'district' attached to it, as is the case with all the other names (Canaan, Ashkelon, Gezer, Khar or Southern Palestine, etc
Assyria, History And Religion of - , he reasserted control over the city-states of Phoenicia, sacked Joppa and Ashkelon, and invaded Judah where Hezekiah had made considerable military preparations (2 Kings 20:20 ; 2Chronicles 32:1-8,2 Chronicles 32:30 ; Isaiah 22:8-11 )
Palestine - Here were located the Philistine strongholds of Gaza, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath