Places Study on Arimathea

Places Study on Arimathea

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American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Arimathea, or Ramah
(Dual, Ramathaim,) A city whence came Joseph the counselor, in whose new tomb the body of Jesus laid, Matthew 27:57 John 19:38 . We learn from Eusebius and Jerome that this city was near Lydia, a town twenty-four miles northwest of Jerusalem. It has generally been located at the modern Ramleh, a town near Lydda, of 3,000 inhabitants, in which the route from Egypt to Syria crosses that from Egypt to Syria crosses that from Jerusalem to Joppa. But its site is rather to be sought a few miles east of Lydda, from Samaria to Judea, which may account for Luke's calling it "a city of the Jews," Luke 23:51 . It has been supposed to be the same place as the Ramah of Mount Ephraim, the birthplace and residence of Samuel. This was called also Ramathaim-Zophim, 1 Samuel 1:1,19 , from which name the from Arimathea is readily derived. See RAMAH .

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph of Arimathea, Saint
First century; born Arimathea, Palestine. He was a wealthy Israelite and a disciple of Christ. He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb. The legend which tells of his coming to Gaul, 63 AD, and subsequently to Great Britain, where he is supposed to have founded the first Christian oratory at Glastonbury, is fabulous. Patron of the church at Glastonbury. Feast, March 17,.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Arimathea
A "city of the Jews" (Luke 23:51 ), the birth-place of Joseph in whose sepulchre our Lord was laid (Matthew 27:57,60 ; John 19:38 ). It is probably the same place as Ramathaim in Ephraim, and the birth-place of Samuel (1 Samuel 1:1,19 ). Others identify it with Ramleh in Dan, or Rama (q.v.) in Benjamin (Matthew 2:18 ).

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Arimathea
(Matthew 27:57). The birthplace or abode of the rich man Joseph, who, by Pilate's leave, which he "boldly" craved, casting away the "fear" which had previously kept him from open discipleship (Mark 15:43; John 19:38), buried our Lord's body in his own "new tomb" at Jerusalem. Arimathea, a "city of the Jews" (Luke's vague expression for the Gentiles, to whom no more precise information seemed needful: Luke 23:51) is possibly identical with Ramah, Samuel's birthplace, called Armathaim in the Septuagint (1 Samuel 1:1; 1 Samuel 1:19); but many associate it with Ramleh, on the road from Jaffa to Jerusalem.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Arimathea
(ahr ih muh thee' uh) City of Joseph, the disciple who claimed the body of Jesus following the crucifixion, and in whose own new tomb the body was placed (Matthew 27:57 ). The location of Arimathea is not certainly known. In Luke 23:51 , Arimathea is described as a Jewish city. See Joseph of Arimathea.



1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arimathea
City of Judea (Luke 23), home of the Joseph who buried Christ in his tomb (Matthew 27); location unknown, probably between Jerusalem and Joppa, possibly Ramleh, two miles south of Lod.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arimathea, Joseph of, Saint
First century; born Arimathea, Palestine. He was a wealthy Israelite and a disciple of Christ. He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb. The legend which tells of his coming to Gaul, 63 AD, and subsequently to Great Britain, where he is supposed to have founded the first Christian oratory at Glastonbury, is fabulous. Patron of the church at Glastonbury. Feast, March 17,.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Arimathea
A lion dead to the Lord
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Arimathea
or RAMAH, now called Ramle, or Ramla, a pleasant town, beautifully situated on the borders of a fertile and extensive plain, abounding in gardens, vineyards, olive and date trees. It stands about thirty miles north-west of Jerusalem, on the high road to Jaffa. At this Rama, which was likewise called Ramathaim Zophim, as lying in the district of Zuph, or Zoph, Samuel was born, 1 Samuel 1. This was likewise the native place of Joseph, called Joseph of Arimathea, who begged and obtained the body of Jesus from Pilate,

Matthew 26:57 . There was another Ramah, about six miles north of Jerusalem, in a pass which separated the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, which Baasha, king of Israel, took and began to fortify; but he was obliged to relinquish it, in consequence of the alliance formed between Asa, king of Judah, and Benhadad, king of Syria, 1 Kings 15. This is the Ramah, supposed to be alluded to in the lamentation of Rachel for her children.

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Arimathea
Arimathea (ăr-i-ma-thç'ah), the heights. A city of Palestine, whence came Joseph the counsellor, mentioned in Luke 23:51. Trelawney Saunders places it east of Bethlehem.

Smith's Bible Dictionary - Arimathea
(heights ). ( Matthew 27:57 ; Luke 23:51 ; John 19:38 ) St. Luke calls it "a city of Judea." It is identified by many with the modern Ramleh .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joseph of Arimathea
Among the members of the Jewish Council that condemned Jesus to death were at least two who disagreed with the decision. One was Nicodemus (cf. John 7:50-51), the other a man named Joseph who came from the Judean village of Arimathea (Luke 23:50-51; John 19:38-39).

Joseph was a just and righteous man, well respected, wealthy, and a follower of Jesus (Matthew 27:57; Mark 15:43; Luke 23:50). Though he feared the Jews, he was bold enough to ask Pilate for the body of Jesus so that he might give Jesus an honourable burial. With Nicodemus he took the body down from the cross, anointed it with spices, wrapped it in linen and placed it in the tomb that he had prepared for himself (Matthew 27:58-60; John 19:38-42).

All Dictionary (12)
1910 New Catholic Dictionary (3)
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary (1)
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary (1)
CARM Theological Dictionary
Chabad Knowledge Base
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection
Easton's Bible Dictionary (1)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary (1)
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament
Heresies of the Church Thru the Ages
Hitchcock's Bible Names (1)
Holman Bible Dictionary (1)
King James Dictionary
Morrish Bible Dictionary
People's Dictionary of the Bible (1)
Smith's Bible Dictionary (1)
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary (1)
Webster's Dictionary
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types

Sentence search

Arimathea - The location of Arimathea is not certainly known. In Luke 23:51 , Arimathea is described as a Jewish city. See Joseph of Arimathea
Arimathea - Arimathea (ăr-i-ma-thç'ah), the heights
Shroud - After His crucifixion, Jesus' body was so buried by Joseph of Arimathea and the women disciples (Matthew 27:59-61 )
Joseph of Arimathea, Saint - First century; born Arimathea, Palestine
Arimathea, Joseph of, Saint - First century; born Arimathea, Palestine
Nicodemus - At the time when the priests and Pharisees had sent officers to seize Jesus, Nicodemus declared himself openly in his favour, John 7:45 , &c; and still more so when he went with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to his body, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in a sepulchre
Ramah - The resemblance of its name Ramathaim to Arimathea of the New Testament, together with intimations of early historians, have led to the general belief that these two places were identical. Arimathea, there is little doubt, lay on one of the hills east of Lydda, some twenty miles northwest of Jerusalem; and this site would meet most of the scriptural intimations as to the Ramah of Samuel. " But the only "Rachel's sepulchre" we know of was near Bethlehem, many miles south of the direct road from Arimathea to Gibeah. Accordingly, if we suppose this interview took place at Arimathea, we seem obliged to suppose another Rachel's sepulchre between it and Gibeah; or if "Rachel's sepulchre" was at Bethlehem, to infer that the city where Saul actually found Samuel, and at which the prophet had only that day arrived, 1 Samuel 9:10 , was not his usual residence, but some place south or south-west of Bethlehem, only visited by him at intervals in his annual circuits as judge
Arimathea - Arimathea, a "city of the Jews" (Luke's vague expression for the Gentiles, to whom no more precise information seemed needful: Luke 23:51) is possibly identical with Ramah, Samuel's birthplace, called Armathaim in the Septuagint (1 Samuel 1:1; 1 Samuel 1:19); but many associate it with Ramleh, on the road from Jaffa to Jerusalem
Glastonbury Thorn - The legend is that the original tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Nicodemus - At last, in the trying scene of the crucifixion, he avowed himself a believer, and came with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to the body of Christ, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in the sepulchre, John 19:39
Thorn, Glastonbury - The legend is that the original tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Holy Sepulcher - It was a new monument, belonging to Joseph of Arimathea, hewn out of a rock, and closed by a great stone (Matthew 27)
Sepulcher, Holy - It was a new monument, belonging to Joseph of Arimathea, hewn out of a rock, and closed by a great stone (Matthew 27)
Joseph of Arimathea - John 7:50-51), the other a man named Joseph who came from the Judean village of Arimathea (Luke 23:50-51; John 19:38-39)
Arimathea, or Ramah - This was called also Ramathaim-Zophim, 1 Samuel 1:1,19 , from which name the from Arimathea is readily derived
Gardens - Mentioned in Scripture, of Eden (Genesis 2:8,9 ); Ahab's garden of herbs (1 Kings 21:2 ); the royal garden (2 Kings 21:18 ); the royal garden at Susa (Esther 1:5 ); the garden of Joseph of Arimathea (John 19:41 ); of Gethsemane (John 18:1 )
Holy Shroud - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Arimathea - This was likewise the native place of Joseph, called Joseph of Arimathea, who begged and obtained the body of Jesus from Pilate, ... Matthew 26:57
Shroud, Holy - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Shroud of Turin - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Turin, Shroud of - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Ramathaim-Zophim - Some have supposed that it may be identical with Arimathea of the New Testament
Nicodemus - That man was Joseph of Arimathea
Glastonbury Abbey - Benedictine monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A
Abbey, Glastonbury - Benedictine monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A
Nicodemus - By the time the Lord Jesus had finished his redemption-work on the cross, we find Nicodemus so advanced in the divine life and his love to Christ, that, in company with Joseph of Arimathea, he went boldly unto Pilate and begged the body of Jesus
Tomb of Jesus - It was a “new tomb” which had been “hewn out in the rock” by Joseph of Arimathea (Matthew 27:60 ; compare Luke 23:50-56 ) who had apparently prepared it for his own family's use
Ramah - It may also be the town, Arimathea, hometown of Joseph, in whose tomb Jesus was buried (Matthew 27:57-60 )
Holy Grail, the - The Grail is said to have been the dish used by Christ at the Paschal supper, to have been used by Joseph of Arimathea to gather the Precious Blood of Christ, and to have been brought to England
Apocrypha - ... The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ... Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ... Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch

Assumption of Moses

Fourth Book of Esdras

Apocalypse of Baruch

Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis

Third Book of Esdras

Third Book of Machabees

History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon

Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles

Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ... Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin

Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew

Arabic Gospel of the Infancy

History of Joseph the Carpenter

Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews

Gospel according to the Egyptians

Gospel of Peter

Gospel of Philip

Gospel of Thomas

Gospel of Marcion

Gospel of Bartholomew

Gospel of Matthias

Gospel of Nicodemus

Gospel of the Twelve Apostles

Gospel of Andrew

Gospel of Barnabas

Gospel of Thaddeus

Gospel of Philip

Gospel of Eve

Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor

Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea

Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter

Acts of John

Acts of Andrew

Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew

Acts of Thomas

Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul

Acts of Paul

Acts of Paul and Thecla

Acts of Philip

Acts of Matthew

Acts of Simon and Jude

Acts of Barnabas

Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini

Nostri Jesu

Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter

Pseudo-Epistles of Paul

Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans

Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter

Apocalypse of Paul
Aloes - —We have in the NT only one reference to aloes, John 19:39, where Nicodemus brings myrrh and aloes with him, when he joins Joseph of Arimathea in taking away the body of Jesus for burial
Joseph - Also important in the New Testament is Joseph of Arimathea, a rich member of the Sanhedrin and a righteous man who sought the kingdom of God (Matthew 27:57 ; Mark 15:43 ; Luke 23:50 ). Arimathea is probably the same as Ramathaim-zophim (1 Samuel 1:1 ) northwest of Jerusalem
Pharisees - On the other hand, there appear to have been among them individuals of probity, and even of genuine piety; as in the case of Joseph of Arimathea, Nicodemus, the aged Simeon, etc
Nicodemus - The rich were ashamed to confess Jesus openly, in spite of convictions of the reality of His mission; so Joseph of Arimathea "a disciple, but secretly for fear of the Jews" (John 19:38). So Nicodemus had the honour of wrapping His sacred body in linen with 100 pounds of myrrh and aloes, in company, with Joseph of Arimathea
Grave - Joshua was buried in “his inheritance in Timnath-serah (Joshua 24:30 ); Samuel on his estate at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 ); Joab on his property in the desert (1 Kings 2:34 ); Manasseh “in the garden of his own house” (2 Kings 21:18 ); and Jesus in the garden tomb of Joseph of Arimathea (Matthew 27:60 ; Mark 15:46 ; Luke 23:53 ; John 19:41 )
Arden - ... John 19:41 (c) Joseph of Arimathea, a rich man, had a garden in which Calvary was located
Joseph - A native of Arimathea, but at the time of Christ's crucifixion a resident at Jerusalem
Burial - ... Our Lord was buried in a new tomb, hewn out of the rock, which Joseph of Arimathea had prepared for himself (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:46 ; John 19:41,42 )
Aceldama - Now as the Lord Jesus, being considered by the law as a criminal, (John 18:30) was thus liable to have been cast out with the common dead; what an overruling power must it have been, to prompt the minds of the honourable counsellor, Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus a ruler of the Jews, to have begged the forfeited body from Pilate!... And there was another providence, directing all this to the accomplishment of the purpose intended; in that the request was so well timed before the chief priests could influence Pilate's mind to refuse; and Pilate's mind so guided by the Lord, to grant the request before that he had power to deliberate
Burial - John the Baptist's disciples buried his body (Matthew 14:12 ), and Joseph of Arimathea buried Jesus (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:42-46 ; Luke 23:50-53 ; John 19:38-42 ; [accompanied by Nicodemus] )
Calvary - It may be useful farther to observe, that it was customary with Jews of property to provide a sepulchre of this kind on their own ground, as the place of their interment after death; and it appears that Calvary itself, or the ground immediately around it, was occupied with gardens; one of which belonged to Joseph of Arimathea, who had then recently caused a new sepulchre to be made for himself
Fruit - Examples include myrrh (aromatic gum of the tree/bush of Arabia, Ethiopia, and Somalia), cinnamon (of the cinnamon tree), and olive oil for the sacred oil for the tabernacle (Exodus 30:22-33 ); the fragrant spices of gum resin (the aromatic myrrh gum), onycha (made from mollusk shells), galbanum (resin from plant roots), and frankincense (resin from a small tree/bush from Ubar, Oman) for the sacred fragrant tabernacle incense (Exodus 30:34-38 ); frankincense and myrrh given by the magi in their worship of Jesus (Matthew 2:11 ); the nard (perfume made from a Middle East plant) Mary poured out in worship on the feet of Jesus (John 12:3 ); the seventy-five-pound mixture of myrrh and aloes (aromatic resin of a Near Eastern tree) Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus used in wrapping up the body of Jesus (John 19:39-40 ) and the spices and perfumes the women took to the tomb to anoint the body of Jesus (Mark 16:1 ; Luke 23:56-24:1 )
Pilate, Pontius - Having ascertained from the centurion that he was dead, he gave up the body to Joseph of Arimathea to be buried
Joseph - ... ·Joseph of Arimathea, John 19:38
Phar'Isees, - We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathea and Paul
Mary Magdalene - Mary Magdalene remained "sitting over against the sepulchre," and "beholding" until Joseph of Arimathea laid the Lord's body in the tomb (Mark 15:47; Matthew 27:61; Luke 23:55)
Burial - So Joseph of Arimathea could not have done a greater honor to our crucified Lord's body than giving it a place in his own new tomb, fulfilling the prophecy Isaiah 53:9 (John 19:31-42)
Joseph - ... ... A native of Arimathea, probably the Ramah of the Old Testament (1 Samuel 1:19 ), a man of wealth, and a member of the Sanhedrim (Matthew 27:57 ; Luke 23:50 ), an "honourable counsellor, who waited for the kingdom of God
Church of England - Paul; and Baronius affirms, on the authority of an ancient manuscript in the Vatican Library, that the Gospel was planted in Britain by Simon Zelotes, the Apostle, and Joseph of Arimathea; and that the latter came over A
Joseph - JOSEPH OF Arimathea, a Jewish senator, and a believer in the divine mission of Jesus Christ, John 19:38
Scribes - This school was better disposed to Christ than Shammai's; to it probably belonged Nicodemus, Joseph of Arimathea, and others too timid to confess Jesus (John 12:42; John 19:38; Luke 23:50-51)
Pharisees - Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea) were friendly towards Him
Disciple, Discipleship - Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea apparently became followers of Jesus sometime during his earthly ministry (John 3:1-14 ; 19:38-42 ), yet presumably remained with the religious establishment and retained their wealth
Pharisees - Among even the Pharisees some accepted the truth, Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea, and John 12:42 and Acts 15:5
Luke, the Gospel According to - ... Theophilus, to whom he writes, was a Gentile believer, as appears from the geographical and other explanations given of many things, which would have been needless had he been a Jew (Luke 1:26, Nazareth; Luke 4:31, Capernaum; Luke 23:51, Arimathea; Luke 24:13, Emmaus; Acts 1:12, Olivet)
Righteousness - ... In the Gospel of Luke, we read of Zechariah and Elizabeth, Simeon and Joseph of Arimathea being called righteous (1:6; 2:25; 23:50) because they embody genuine religion according to the norms of the Old Covenant
Wealth - Joseph of Arimathea is called rich (Matthew 27:57 )
Abraham - The women of Galilee who ministered to Him of their substance will be brought forward; Martha will be brought forward, and the woman at the well; the owner of the ass's colt, and the owner of the upper room, and the owner of Gethsemane; Simon the Cyrenian also, who helped Him to carry His cross; the soldier also who gave Him some of his vinegar to drink; and Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus, and the women with their spices, and the angel who rolled away the stone
Judea - In the north-west quarter were Bethshemesh, or Heliopolis, a Levitical city, about ten miles west of the capital; Rama, six miles north from Jerusalem; Emmaus, a village eight miles north north-west from Jerusalem, afterward called Nicopolis, in consequence of a victory gained by Vespasian over the revolted Jews; Bethoron, a populous Levitical city on the road to Lydda, a few miles north-west of Emmaus; Kirjath-jearim, on the road to Joppa, nine miles westward from the capital; Lydda, now Lod, and called by the Greeks Diospolis, about twelve miles east of Joppa; Ramla, supposed to be the same as Arimathea, about five miles south-west of Lydda; Joppa, a maritime town, now Jaffa, about twelve leagues north-west of Jerusalem; Jabne, a walled sea-port town between Joppa and Azotus; and Ekron, a town on the north boundary of the Philistines
Jesus Christ - ... Jesus' body was hastily placed in a tomb by Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus, because the day ended at 6 p
Christianity - Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself