Character Study on Narcissus

Character Study on Narcissus

Romans 16: Salute Herodion my kinsman. Greet them that be of the household of Narcissus, which are in the Lord.

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Morrish Bible Dictionary - Narcissus
A resident at Rome to whose household Paul sent his salutations. Romans 16:11 .

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Narcissus
Daffodil, a Roman whom Paul salutes (Romans 16:11 ). He is supposed to have been the private secretary of the emperor Claudius. This is, however, quite uncertain.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Narcissus
Romans 16:11. A house holder at Rome, of whose family some were known to Paul as being Christians.

King James Dictionary - Narcissus
NARCISSUS, n. In botany, the daffodil, a genus of plants of several species. They are of the bulbous rooted tribe, perennial in root, but with annual leaves and flower stalks.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Narcissus
NARCISSUS. St. Paul in his Epistle to the Romans (ch. Romans 16:11 ) salutes, among others, ‘them that he of the household of Narcissus that are in the Lord.’ The name was not uncommon, but many have identified the person mentioned here with the secretary of the Emperor Claudius, who was put to death by Agrippina in the first year of Nero’s reign, about three years before this Epistle was written. According to the custom of those times, the household of the freedman of Claudius would pass into the possession of Nero, retaining the name of their deceased owner. It will be noted that the salutation is not addressed to Narcissus himself, but to the members of his household.

Morley Stevenson.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Narcissus
Astonishment; stupidity
Webster's Dictionary - Narcissus
(1):

(n.) A beautiful youth fabled to have been enamored of his own image as seen in a fountain, and to have been changed into the flower called Narcissus.

(2):

(n.) A genus of endogenous bulbous plants with handsome flowers, having a cup-shaped crown within the six-lobed perianth, and comprising the daffodils and jonquils of several kinds.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Narcissus
In the Greek, the word means surprise. He is spoken of Romans 16:11.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Narcissus
A Roman, many of whose household Paul salutes as Christians, Romans 16:11 . Two men of this name are mentioned in Roman histories of that time; one, executed three or four years before Paul wrote, was a favorite of the emperor Claudius; the other, of Nero his successor.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Narcissus
(Ναρκίσσος, a common Latin name)

In Romans 16:11 St. Paul salutes ‘them of the household of Narcissus, which are in the Lord’ (τοὺς ἐκ τῶν Ναρκίσσου τοὺς ὄντας ἐν κυρίῳ), i.e. the Christians in his familia or establishment of freedmen and slaves (perhaps known as Narcissiani, for which the Greek phrase would be equivalent). J. B. Lightfoot (Philippians4, 1878, p. 175) thinks that the Narcissus referred to was the powerful freedman of that name, whose wealth was proverbial (Juv. Sat. xiv. 329), whose influence was very great in the intrigues of the reign of Claudius, and who had been put to death by Agrippina shortly after the accession of Nero (Tac. Ann. xiii. 1; Dio Cass. lx. 34), in a.d. 54. It was customary in such cases for the household to become the property of the Emperor while it retained the name of its old master (cf. probably ‘the household of Aristobulus’ [q.v. [Note: .v. quod vide, which see.] ], whose Christian members are saluted in v. 10). If Romans 16 be an integral part of Romans, and therefore directed to Rome, this may indeed be the household referred to; for although there may have been other establishments whose master’s name was Narcissus, this must have been the most famous. If so, some three years had elapsed since it had passed into the hands of Nero. For the occurrence of the name Narcissus on inscriptions see Sanday-Headlam, International Critical Commentary , ‘Romans’4, 1900, p. 425 f. The Christians in the household would naturally form one of the distinct communities of which the Church at Rome was apparently made up (cf. v. 10 and the phrases in vv. 5, 15). ‘The master was not a Christian, and therefore it was not his whole household, but in each case an indefinite number of his servants who had been converted. Plainly therefore the conversion of one of them had at once created a centre for the diffusion of the gospel. We have here at any rate a proof, not only that the closer social connections in general contributed to the spread of the truth, but that the servile class were especially susceptible’ (C. von Weizsäcker, Apostolic Age, Eng. translation , i. 2 [1897] 397). As the salutation to these Christians is preceded by a greeting to ‘Herodion my kinsman,’ it is conjectured that Herodion was a member of the household of Narcissus and the nucleus of the community or church. Some scholars think that the mention of this household is conclusive in favour of the Roman destination of Romans 16, but to others, in view of the strong probability that the chapter belong to a letter to the Church at Ephesus, it seems quite reasonable to suppose that there was a ‘household of Narcissus’ known to St. Paul in that city.

T. B. Allworthy.

A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Narcissus, Bishop of Jerusalem
Narcissus (1) , bp. of Jerusalem. Clinton (Fasti Romani ) accepts the date a.d. 190 for the commencement of his episcopate. He was the 15th of the Gentile bishops of Jerusalem, reckoning from Marcus, a.d. 136, and the 30th in succession from the apostles (Eus. H. E. v. 12). According to the Synodicon , Narcissus presided over a council of 14 bishops of Palestine held at Jerusalem a.d. 198, on the Paschal controversy, and took part in that at Caesarea on the same subject under the presidency of Theophilus, bp. of the city (Labbe, Concil. i. 600). Eusebius speaks of the synodical letter of these bishops as still extant in his time (Eus. H. E. v. 23). Narcissus was conspicuous in the church of his day (Neale, Patriarch. of Antioch , p. 34; Eus. H. E. v. 12). Eusebius records a miracle traditionally ascribed to him, whereby water was converted into oil one Easter Eve, when the oil required for the great illumination had failed (Eus. H. E. vi. 9). The sanctity of his life raised against him a band of slanderers. Narcissus, stung by their calumny, abdicated his bishopric, and retired to the remotest part of the desert, where for several years he lived the ascetic life he had long coveted, no one knowing the place of his concealment.

Having been sought for in vain, the neighbouring bishops declared the see vacant, and ordained Dius as his successor, who was succeeded by Germanicus, and he by Gordius. During the episcopate of Gordius, Narcissus reappeared. Shortly after his disappearance the falsity of the charges against him, Eusebius tells us, had been proved by the curses imprecated by the false accusers having been fearfully made good. This, having eventually reached Narcissus's ears, probably led to his return. He at once resumed the oversight of his see at the earnest request of all (ib. 9, 10). In the 2nd year of Caracalla, a.d. 212 (Eus. Chronicon ), Alexander, a Cappadocian bishop, a confessor in the persecution of Severus, visiting the holy city in fulfilment of a vow, was selected by the aged Narcissus as his coadjutor and eventual successor. Eusebius preserves a fragment of a letter written by Alexander to the people of Antinous, in which he speaks of Narcissus as being then in his 116th year, and as having virtually retired from his episcopal office (Eus. H. E. vi. 11). Epiphanius states that he lived ten years after Alexander became his coadjutor, to the reign of Alexander Severus, a.d. 222 (Epiph. Haer. lxvi. 20). This, however, is very improbable. Tillem. Mém. eccl. iii. 177 ff.

[E.V.]

Sentence search

Polyanthus - (b) A bulbous flowering plant of the genus Narcissus (N. of Narcissus
Narcisus - ” The Narcissus of Romans 16:11 headed a household, perhaps including slaves and/or associated freedmen, which included some Christians. The most famous Narcissus was a freedman who served as an advisor to Emperor Claudius (A. It is possible, though not certain, that Paul had this Narcissus in mind
Daffodil - ) A plant of the genus Narcissus (N. Pseudo-Narcissus)
Narcissuses - ) of Narcissus...
Narcissine - ) Of or pertaining to Narcissus
Easter Lily - ... (5):... The daffodil (Narcissus Pseudo-Narcissus)
Paracorolla - ) A secondary or inner corolla; a corona, as of the Narcissus
Narcissus - Narcissus. Romans 16:11 ) salutes, among others, ‘them that he of the household of Narcissus that are in the Lord. It will be noted that the salutation is not addressed to Narcissus himself, but to the members of his household
Rose - in (Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ) There is much difference of opinion as to what particular flower is here denoted; but it appears to us most probable that the Narcissus is intended. Chateaubriand mentions the Narcissus as growing in the Plain of Sharon
Rose - The Narcissus is very fragrant, and therefore more likely than the crocus; the lily is associated with it in the Song of Solomon. They blossom about the same time; another reason for the Narcissus rather than the crocus, which blossoms not until autumn. The Narcissus grows in the plain of Sharon (Chateaubriand, Itineraire, ii
Narcissus, Bishop of Jerusalem - Narcissus (1) , bp. According to the Synodicon , Narcissus presided over a council of 14 bishops of Palestine held at Jerusalem a. Narcissus was conspicuous in the church of his day (Neale, Patriarch. Narcissus, stung by their calumny, abdicated his bishopric, and retired to the remotest part of the desert, where for several years he lived the ascetic life he had long coveted, no one knowing the place of his concealment. During the episcopate of Gordius, Narcissus reappeared. This, having eventually reached Narcissus's ears, probably led to his return. Chronicon ), Alexander, a Cappadocian bishop, a confessor in the persecution of Severus, visiting the holy city in fulfilment of a vow, was selected by the aged Narcissus as his coadjutor and eventual successor. Eusebius preserves a fragment of a letter written by Alexander to the people of Antinous, in which he speaks of Narcissus as being then in his 116th year, and as having virtually retired from his episcopal office (Eus
Narcissus - Narcissus, n
Amaryllideous - The Narcissus and daffodil are members of this family
Amaryllis - ) A family of plants much esteemed for their beauty, including the Narcissus, jonquil, daffodil, agave, and others
Narcis'Sus - Some have assumed the identity of this Narcissus with the secretary of the emperor Claudius; but this is quite uncertain
Narcissus - Paul salutes ‘them of the household of Narcissus, which are in the Lord’ (τοὺς ἐκ τῶν Ναρκίσσου τοὺς ὄντας ἐν κυρίῳ), i. 175) thinks that the Narcissus referred to was the powerful freedman of that name, whose wealth was proverbial (Juv. If Romans 16 be an integral part of Romans, and therefore directed to Rome, this may indeed be the household referred to; for although there may have been other establishments whose master’s name was Narcissus, this must have been the most famous. For the occurrence of the name Narcissus on inscriptions see Sanday-Headlam, International Critical Commentary , ‘Romans’4, 1900, p. As the salutation to these Christians is preceded by a greeting to ‘Herodion my kinsman,’ it is conjectured that Herodion was a member of the household of Narcissus and the nucleus of the community or church. Some scholars think that the mention of this household is conclusive in favour of the Roman destination of Romans 16, but to others, in view of the strong probability that the chapter belong to a letter to the Church at Ephesus, it seems quite reasonable to suppose that there was a ‘household of Narcissus’ known to St
Narcissus - ) A beautiful youth fabled to have been enamored of his own image as seen in a fountain, and to have been changed into the flower called Narcissus
Crocus - The flower mentioned in the Bible (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ; Isaiah 35:1 ) has been identified as either the Narcissus (N
Rose, - Roses grow in Palestine, but it is generally agreed that the above Hebrew word does not refer to the rose, but implies a bulbous plant, and it may be the lily, the crocus, or the Narcissus
Rose - The "rose of Sharon," sacredly associated with the heavenly Bridegroom, Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 Isaiah 35:1 , appears from the derivation of its Hebrew name to have been a bulbous plant; and is generally believed, in accordance with the ancient versions, to denote a plant of the Narcissus family, perhaps the meadow-saffron, which grows in rich profusion on the plain of Sharon
Echo - In fabulous history, a nymph, the daughter of the Air and Tellus, who pined into a sound, for love of Narcissus
Rose - , "autumn crocus"), is supposed by some to mean the oleander, by others the sweet-scented Narcissus (a native of Palestine), the tulip, or the daisy; but nothing definite can be affirmed regarding it
Rose - ] suggests ‘autumn crocus’ ( Colchicum autumnale ); on the other hand, many good authorities suggest the much more striking and sweeter-scented plant the Narcissus, which is a great favourite to-day in Palestine
Echo - ) A nymph, the daughter of Air and Earth, who, for love of Narcissus, pined away until nothing was left of her but her voice
Alexander, Bishop of Jerusalem - Narcissus. On the death of Narcissus, Alexander succeeded as sole bishop
Herodion - Others have conjectured that Herodion belonged to ‘the household of Narcissus’ saluted in the verse which follows
Asyncritus - That such little communities existed in Rome, each with its own place of meeting, would appear from other similar phrases in Romans 16 : ‘the church that is in their house’ (Romans 16:5), ‘all the saints that are with them’ (Romans 16:15), and from the references to the Christian members of the ‘households’ of Aristobulus and Narcissus (Romans 16:10-11)
Sharon - It still preserves some portions of its natural beauty, and is adorned in the spring with the white and red rose, the Narcissus, the white and orange lily, the carnation and other flowers; but for the rest of the year it appears little better than a desert, with here and there a ruined village, and some clumps of olive trees and sycamores
Sharon - 1 Chronicles 5:16; Isaiah 33:9, "the excellency (beauty) of Sharon" (Isaiah 35:2), Isaiah 65:10; Song of Solomon 2:1, "the rose (Narcissus) of Sharon," famous for flowers and for pasture; Acts 9:35
Eusebius Emesenus, Bishop of Emesa - By George's exertions, and the influence of Flaccillus of Antioch and Narcissus of Neronias, the Emesenes were convinced of the groundlessness of their suspicions, and Eusebius obtained quiet possession
Victor, Bishop of Rome - Synods were held on the subject in various parts—in Palestine under Theophilus of Caesarea and Narcissus of Jerusalem, in Pontus under Palmas, in Gaul under Irenaeus, in Corinth under its bishop, Bachillus, at Osrhoene in Mesopotamia, and elsewhere, by all of which synodical letters were issued, unanimous in disapproval of the Asian custom, and in declaring that "on the Lord's Day only the mystery of the resurrection of the Lord from the dead was accomplished, and that on that day only we keep the close of the paschal fast" (Eus
Family - ... Under this head we may notice four households mentioned in the NT: the ‘household of Caesar’ (ἠ Καίσαρος οἰκία), Philippians 4:22; ‘they of Aristobulus,’ Romans 16:10; ‘they of Narcissus,’ Romans 16:11; and ‘they of Chloe,’ 1 Corinthians 1:11. are probably due to the fact that Aristebulus and Narcissus wore dead (for their identification with well-known characters see Lightfoot, and Sanday. 425), and that their households were absorbed in that of Caesar, but still retained their old names, ‘They of Aristobulus1 would be equivalent to ‘Aristobuliani,’ and ‘they of Narcissus’ to ‘Narcissiani
Claudius - Many of these reforms were doubtless due to the Emperor’s freedmen, Narcissus, the ab epistulis, M
Romans Epistle to the - It is possible that the households of Aristobulus and Narcissus (Romans 16:10-11) may refer to the slaves of the Imperial household inherited from Aristobulus, the grandson of Herod the Great, and to those of the Narcissus who was executed by Agrippina, but again the names are common, and, as Lake points out, we should expect οἱ Ναρκισσιανοί instead of οἱ Ναρκίσσου, words ending in -ani being usually transliterated
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
Plants in the Bible - The “rose of Sharon” (Song of Song of Solomon 2:1 ) has been equated with anemone, rockrose, Narcissus, tulip, and crocus
Vespasian - His patron Narcissus, the powerful freedman of Claudius, died in 54, and Agrippina, widow of Claudius and mother of Nero, pursued his former friends with hatred
Palesti'na - The geranium, pink, poppy, Narcissus, honeysuckle, oleander, jessamine, tulip and iris are abundant
Eusebius (60), Bishop of Nicomedia - 20) who at first refused their signatures among them both the Eusebii Theognis of Nicaea Menophantus of Ephesus Secundus of Ptolemais Theonas Patrophilus Narcissus Maris and others
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - Narcissus, Maris, and two other prelates appeared before Constans at Trèves, spoke in support of the decisions against Athanasius, and presented a creed which might, at first sight, appear all but to confess the "Homoousion