Character Study on Jason

Character Study on Jason

Acts 17: But the Jews which believed not, moved with envy, took unto them certain lewd fellows of the baser sort, and gathered a company, and set all the city on an uproar, and assaulted the house of Jason, and sought to bring them out to the people.
Acts 17: And when they found them not, they drew Jason and certain brethren unto the rulers of the city, crying, These that have turned the world upside down are come hither also;
Acts 17: Whom Jason hath received: and these all do contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus.
Acts 17: And when they had taken security of Jason, and of the other, they let them go.
Romans 16: Timotheus my workfellow, and Lucius, and Jason, and Sosipater, my kinsmen, salute you.

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Dictionary

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jason
He that cures
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jason
(Hebrew: healer)

(1) Son of Eleazer, sent by Judas Machabeus to Rome to make a treaty with the Romans (1Machabees 8). He had a son Antipater (1Machabees 12).

(2) Jason of Cyrene, author of the history of the Jews, persecuted under Antiochus Epiphanes and Eupator. He also wrote the exploits of Judas Machabeus in five books, from which the author of 2Machabees has taken his recital (2Machabees 2).

(3) Brother of the high-priest Onias III and son of Simon II. He had insatiable ambition. He bought the High-priesthood for a great sum of silver (2Machabees 4). Forgetting completely his calling, he sought to introduce Greek customs among the Jews. Three years later Jason was forced to flee, and took refuge with the Ammonites. During the second expedition of Antiochus into Egypt, hearing a rumor that the king had died, Jason at the head of the Ammonites besieged Jerusalem, and slew his countrymen without mercy (2Machabees 5). He was pursued from city to city, an object of contempt and hatred, and he ended his miserable life at Sparta, unlamented and unburied.

Holman Bible Dictionary - Jason
(jay' ssuhn) Personal name often used by Jews as a substitute for Hebrew Joshua or Joseph and also used by Gentiles. 1. In Acts 17:5 , Paul's host in Thessalonica. He was brought up on charges before the city officials when the angry Jewish mob were unable to find Paul (Acts 17:6-7 ). The Jason mentioned in Romans 16:21 may have been the same person. He is identified as a Jew who joined Paul and others in greeting the Romans. 2. A Jewish high priest during the final years of Seleucid control of Palestine. His Greek name reflects the Hellenistic influence that increasingly permeated Jewish life during the period before the Maccabean revolt. See Intertestamental History.



Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jason
Graecized from Joshua. The Thessalonian who received Paul and Silas (Acts 17:5-7; Acts 17:9), whom the mob therefore, after assaulting his house, dragged before the magistrates. Jason had to give security before he was let go. In Romans 16:21 Paul sends Jason's salutations from Corinth, calling him his "kinsman" or fellow tribesman, or fellow countryman, as the word is used Romans 9:3.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jason
JASON . This Greek name was adopted by many Jews whose Hebrew designation was Joshua (Jesus). 1. The son of Eleazar deputed to make a treaty with the Romans, and father of Antipater who was later sent on a similar errand, unless two different persons are meant ( 1Ma 8:17 ; 1Ma 12:16 ; 1Ma 14:22 ). 2. Jason of Cyrene, an author, of whose history 2 Mac. (see 2Ma 2:23 ; 2Ma 2:26 ) is an epitome (written after b.c. 160). 3. Joshua the high priest, who ousted his brother Onias iii. from the office in b.c. 174 ( 2Ma 4:7 ff.), but was himself driven out three years later, and died among the Lacedæmonians at Sparta ( 2Ma 5:9 f.). 4. In Acts 17:6 ff. a Jason was St. Paul’s host at Thessalonica, from whom the politarchs took bail for his good behaviour, thus (as it seems) preventing St. Paul’s return to Macedonia for a long time (see art. Paul the Apostle, § 8). The Jason who sends greetings from Corinth in Romans 16:21 , a ‘kinsman’ of St. Paul ( i.e. a Jew), is probably the same man.

A. J. Maclean.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jason
(Ἰάσων)

Jason is a Greek name, often adopted by Jews of the Dispersion, sometimes as not unlike the names Joseph or Joshua.

1. In Acts 17:5 ff., the host of St. Paul and Silas at Thessalonica, who was seized with other converts and dragged before the politarchs. These authorities bound over Jason and his friends in security that there should be no further disturbance and perhaps that St. Paul should leave the city and not return (see Ramsay, St. Paul the Traveller and the Roman Citizen, 1895, p. 230f.).

2. In Romans 16:21, a person whose greetings St. Paul sends to his readers with greetings from Timothy, Lucius, and Sosipater, all of whom he describes as his ‘kinsmen,’ i.e. fellow-Jews or perhaps members of the same tribe. It is quite probable that 1 and 2 are the same man.

T. B. Allworthy.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jason
The host of Paul and Silas at Thessalonica, whose house was attacked by the Jews, and himself arrested. Acts 17:5-9 . Perhaps the same as the one at Rome described as a kinsman of Paul. Romans 16:21 .

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jason
Jason (jâ'son), one who will heal. A Thessalonian, and probably a relative of Paul, whom he entertained, and in consequence received rough treatment at the Hands of the unbelieving Jews. Acts 17:1-34; with Romans 16:21.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jason
A kinsman and host of Paul, at Thessalonica. His person and goods were interposed to shield the apostle from the rabble, A. D. 52, Acts 17:5-10 . He seems also to have been with him at Corinth, five years afterwards, Romans 16:21 .

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jason
He that will cure, the host of Paul and Silas in Thessalonica. The Jews assaulted his house in order to seize Paul, but failing to find him, they dragged Jason before the ruler of the city (Acts 17:5-9 ). He was apparently one of the kinsmen of Paul (Romans 16:21 ), and accompanied him from Thessalonica to Corinth.

Sentence search

ja'Son - ) He is probably the same as the Jason mentioned in (Romans 16:21 ) It is conjectured that Jason and Secundus, (Acts 20:4 ) were the same
Menelaus - 1), a younger brother of Jason and Onias. 172), thereby causing the deposition of Jason, who had obtained the office by similar corrupt means. , who threatened to divulge the sacrilege ( 2Ma 4:27-34 ), he became so unpopular that Jason marched against him to recover the office he had lost ( 2Ma 5:5-10 ). After this attempt of Jason, which ended in failure, Menelaus is lost to sight for some years, but finally suffered death at the hands of Antiochus Eupator ( c [Note: circa, about
Jason - Jason . Jason of Cyrene, an author, of whose history 2 Mac. a Jason was St. The Jason who sends greetings from Corinth in Romans 16:21 , a ‘kinsman’ of St
Mnason - (mnay' ssuhn) Personal name meaning, “remembering,” variant of Jason
Plutus - ) The son of Jason and Ceres, and the god of wealth
Antipater - Son of Jason, one of two ambassadors sent by Jonathan to the Romans and to the Spartans to renew ‘the friendship and the confederacy’ ( 1Ma 12:16 ; 1Ma 14:22 )
na'um - (consolation ), son of Esli, and father of Amos, in the genealogy of Christ, ( Luke 3:25 ) about contemporary with the high priesthood of Jason all the reign of Antiochus Epiphanes
Are'Tas, or ar'Etas - 170, and Jason
Jason - ... (2) Jason of Cyrene, author of the history of the Jews, persecuted under Antiochus Epiphanes and Eupator. Three years later Jason was forced to flee, and took refuge with the Ammonites. During the second expedition of Antiochus into Egypt, hearing a rumor that the king had died, Jason at the head of the Ammonites besieged Jerusalem, and slew his countrymen without mercy (2Machabees 5)
Jason - Jason (jâ'son), one who will heal
Security - It is only in Acts 17:9 that the word concerns us at present: ‘And when they had taken security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. ’ It is uncertain also whether the security was for the ‘good behaviour’ of Jason and the rest, for the production of St. Paul and Silas, but also of Jason and the rest, because of ‘the security’ given to the politarchs. It is not open to make a charge of cowardice here against either Jason or St
Sosipater - (Σωσίπατρος, a Greek name)... Sosipater is one of three men, Lucius and Jason being the others, who send salutations in Romans 16:21 and are described by St. It is possible that Jason (q. ] ) is identical with Jason of Acts 17:5 f. It is perhaps in favour of this theory that the salutations of Lucius, Jason, and Sosipater are sent with those of Timothy and not with those of the Corinthian Christians, Gaius, Erastus, Quartus (Acts 20:23), the personal greeting of the amanuensis being interposed (Acts 20:22)
Argonaut - ) Any one of the legendary Greek heroes who sailed with Jason, in the Argo, in quest of the Golden Fleece
Argo - ) The name of the ship which carried Jason and his fifty-four companions to Colchis, in quest of the Golden Fleece
Jason - (Ἰάσων)... Jason is a Greek name, often adopted by Jews of the Dispersion, sometimes as not unlike the names Joseph or Joshua. These authorities bound over Jason and his friends in security that there should be no further disturbance and perhaps that St
Jason - The Jews assaulted his house in order to seize Paul, but failing to find him, they dragged Jason before the ruler of the city (Acts 17:5-9 )
Martyrs of Corfu - They were converted in prison by Saint Jason and Saint Sosipater, who had been arrested for preaching the faith throughout the island
Jason - Jason had to give security before he was let go. In Romans 16:21 Paul sends Jason's salutations from Corinth, calling him his "kinsman" or fellow tribesman, or fellow countryman, as the word is used Romans 9:3
Aristo Pellaeus - Aristo Pellaeus , the supposed author of a lost dialogue between Papiscus and Jason, quoted, without his name, by Origen (cont. Corderii) in these words, "I have also read the expression 'seven heavens' in the dialogue of Papiscus and Jason, composed by Aristo of Pella, which Clemens of Alexandria in the 6th book of his Hypotyposes says was written by St. Jason, a Jewish Christian, argues so conclusively that the Messianic prophecies are fulfilled in our Lord that his opponent, the Jew Papiscus, begs to be baptized
Assault - , "to stand over" (epi, "over," histemi, "to stand"), signifies "to assault;" said in Acts 17:5 , of those who attacked the house of Jason
Lacedaemonians - In 2Ma 5:9 we read that Jason fled for refuge to the Lacedæmonians ‘because they were near of kin
Security - Probably the bond given to the authorities by Jason and his friends included an undertaking that Paul would not return to Thessalonica
Antiochians - The leader of this Hellenizing party, Jason, brother of the high priest Onias III
Hercules - HERCULES is mentioned by this name only in 2Ma 4:19-20 , where Jason, the head of the Hellenizing party in Jerus
Jason - The Jason mentioned in Romans 16:21 may have been the same person
Sopater, Sosipater - fellow-countryman [see Jason], of St
Jesting - , the poet Pindar speaks of one Jason as never using a word of "vain lightness," a meaning deteriorated, and it came to denote "coarse jesting, ribaldry," as in Ephesians 5:4 , where it follows morologia, "foolish talking
Mnason - א and one or two Versions read ‘Jason’ for ‘Mnason’; cf
Thessalonica - Members of the church here were Jason, Gaius, Secundus, Aristarchus
Thessalonica - The "rulers of the city" before whom the Jews "drew Jason," with whom Paul and Silas lodged, are in the original called politarchai, an unusual word, which was found, however, inscribed on an arch in Thessalonica
Thessalonica - Among his converts were Caius, Aristarchus, Secundus, and perhaps Jason
Mac'Cabees, Books of - The writer himself distinctly indicates the source of his narrative--the five books of Jason of Cyrene, ch. Of Jason himself nothing more is known than may be gleaned from this mention of him
Lewd Lewdness - They were so far successful as to prevail on the politarchs to exact bail from Jason for peaceful behaviour, with the consequence that St. He concludes, however, that the reference is to the attitude of the politarchs, who, by exacting security for good behaviour from Jason, prevented the return of St
Ruler - ... 4: πολιτάρχης (Strong's #4173 — Noun Masculine — politarches — pol-it-ar'-khace ) "a ruler of a city" (polis, "a city," archo, "to rule"), "a politarch," is used in Acts 17:6,8 , of the magistrates in Thessalonica, before whom the Jews, with a mob of market idlers, dragged Jason and other converts, under the charge of showing hospitality to Paul and Silas, and of treasonable designs against the emperor
Cyrene - Cyrenian Jews are mentioned in 1 Maccabees 15:23, 2 Maccabees 2:23 (Jason of Cyrene)
Thessalonica - (See PAUL and Jason on this visit. ... On the same night that the Jewish assault on Jason's house in search of Paul and Silas his guests took place, the latter two set out for Berea
Games (2) - The introduction of a gymnasium by Jason (2 Maccabees 4:7-19) was accounted an act of disloyalty to the faith of his fathers, and a surrender to Hellenic influences
Thessalonica - As the peace of the city had been disturbed, the angry passions of the ‘wild beast’ aroused, and a dangerous state of public feeling created, they felt justified in binding over the Apostle’s friends-Jason and others-to keep the peace, and in the circumstances this could be done only if those friends advised the man who was the innocent cause of the disturbance to leave the town. Members of the church of Thessalonica whose names are known are Jason, Gaius, Secundus, Aristarchus, and perhaps Demas
Jeshua - First high priest of the third series, namely, that which succeeded the Babylonian captivity; ancestor of the 14 high priests down to Joshua (or Jason) and Onias (or Menelaus)
High Priest - Jason, a Hellenistic sympathizer, ousted his more conservative brother Onias III (2Maccabees 4:7-10,2 Maccabees 4:18-20 ). Jason was, in turn, ousted by the more radically Hellenistic Menelaus who offered the Seleucid rulers an even larger bribe to secure the office (2 Maccabees 4:23-26 )
Aretas - The first known to history, ‘Aretas, prince of the Arabians,’ is said to have had the fugitive high-priest Jason shut up at his court (2 Maccabees 5:8; the Gr
Aristion (Aristo) - Corder), undoubtedly refers to the same ‘Aristo of Pella’ (Ἀρίστωνι τῷ Πελλαίῳ) as author of the Christian Dialogue of Jason and Papiscus, basing his statement on ‘the sixth book of the Hypotyposcis of Clement of Alexandria,’ who seems to have referred to this ‘Jason’ as ‘mentioned by (l. ] regards it as a conclusive objection to Resch’s identification that ‘Aristo of Pella, who wrote his (?) Dialogue of Jason and Papiscus after 135, and perhaps a good deal later, cannot be the author of a section (Mark 16:9-20) which Tatian already read in his Mark at the latest in 170, and which Justin had already known so early as 150, though perhaps not (N. ... This source can scarcely have been the Dialogue of Jason and Papiscus, whoever its author; for while Jerome was acquainted with this work (Com
Maccabees - After these epistles follows the preface of the author to his history, which is an abridgment of a larger work, composed by one Jason, a Jew of Cyrene, who wrote in Greek the history of Judas Maccabaeus, and his brethren, and the wars against Antiochus Epiphanes, and Eupator his son
Antiochus - He came to Jerusalem in 3831, and was received there by Jason, to whom he had sold the high priesthood. Jason procured himself to be constituted in this dignity in the stead of Onias III; but Menelaus offering a greater price, Jason was deprived, and Menelaus appointed in his place
Thessalonians, First Epistle to the - Paul, in the course of his second missionary journey, went from Philippi to Thessalonica, and reasoned there in the synagogue for three Sabbaths, with the result that ‘some of them were persuaded, and consorted with Paul and Silas; and of the devout Greeks a great multitude, and of the chief women not a few’ ( Acts 17:4 ) There follows a tumult of the Jews, and accusation against Jason, St. (Very possibly Jason’s bond involved a pledge that St
Thessalonians Epistles to the - ] of the city, created an uproar, stormed the house where the apostles lodged, and dragged Jason their host before the municipal assembly. They bound over Jason and ‘the rest’ to keep the peace of the city and let them go, probably holding them responsible for the continued absence of Paul and Silas from Thessalonica (Ramsay, St
Antiochus - At first he followed the liberal policy of his predecessors; but when it suited his purpose to plunder the Jews and destroy their polity, he did not hesitate, and the corruptions prevalent and the rivalries of Jason and Menelaus for the high priesthood afforded him the occasion
Name, Names - Non-Jewish names were substituted for Jewish: Jason for Jesus; Simon for Simeon (Deissmann, Bible Studies , p
Games - ... We read in 2Ma 4:9-17 how Jason the high priest and the head of the Hellenizing party, having bribed Antiochus Epiphanes with 150 talents of silver, set up ‘a place of exercise’ (gymnasium) for the training up of youths ‘in the practices of the heathen
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
Thessalonians, the Epistles to the - Thenceforth he held the church assemblies in the house of Jason (Acts 17:5), his "kinsman" (Romans 16:21). It is an undesigned coincidence confirming the authenticity of the history and of the epistles that the very charge which Jason's assailants brought against the brethren was "these do contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus" (Acts 17:5-9)
Paul - Here again, as in Pisidian Antioch, the envy of the Jews was excited, and the mob assaulted the house of Jason with whom Paul and Silas were staying as guests, and, not finding them, dragged Jason himself and some other brethren before the magistrates
Apocrypha - It is based upon five volumes written by Jason of Cyrene, about which volumes nothing is known
Apocrypha - Second Maccabees is an abridgment of a five-volume work by Jason of Cyrene ( 2Ma 2:23 )
Dispersion - The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
Dispersion - The names of Barnabas of Cyprus, Philip of Caesarea, Lucius of Cyrene, Timothy of Lystra, Jason of Thessalonica, Sopater of Berœa, Crispus of Corinth, Aquila of Pontus, illustrate how largely the Church’s assets consisted of Jews settled abroad
High Priest - Jesus and Onias adopted the Greek names Jason and Menelaus, and to gain the Syro-Greek kings' favor began to forsake the Jewish laws for Greek customs
Assumption of Moses - They are divided as to the truth, and pollute the altar with their non-Aaronic priests, ‘not priests but slaves, sons of slaves’ (Jason and Menelaus)
Hellenism - ... (b) Palestine itself, the native soil of Judaism, came under the political and cultural influence of the Ptolemys of Egypt and the Seleucids of Syria, and this influence became so strong that we find the religious leaders of the Jewish people, the priestly aristocracy, calling their sons by Greek names (Menelaus [Menahem] or Jason [Joshua, Jesus]), and making them practise athletics according to the Greek usage
Boyhood - At Jerusalem, during the high priesthood of Jason (b
Jews - Near Jerusalem places were appropriated to gymnastic exercises; and the people were led by Jason, who had obtained the high priesthood from Antiochus Epiphanes by the most dishonourable means, to neglect the temple worship, and the observance of the law, in a far greater degree than, at any period since their return from the captivity