Character Study on Hermes

Character Study on Hermes

Romans 16: Salute Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermas, Patrobas, Hermes, and the brethren which are with them.

Chain Links

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hermes
(huhr' meess) In Acts 14:12 , the Greek deity for whom the superstitious people at Lystra took Paul. KJV uses the god's Latin name, Mercurius. Hermes was known as a messenger of the gods and was associated with eloquence. Paul's role as chief speaker made the Lystrans think of Hermes.



Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hermes
Mercury, a Roman Christian (Romans 16:14 ).

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hermes
HERMES . One of those greeted in Romans 16:14 , possibly a slave in Caesar’s household. Hermes was a very common slave’s name (Lightfoot, Philipp , p. 176).

A. J. Maclean.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hermes
("saluted".) Romans 16:14. One of the seventy, and bishop of Dalmatia afterward, according to tradition (?).

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hermes
Christian at Rome saluted by Paul. Romans 16:14 .

A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Hermes (1) Trismegistus, Writings of Unknown Authorship
Hermes (1) Trismegistus. Under this title we have a variety of writings of uncertain date and unknown authorship originating in Egypt. The name "Hermes Trismegistus" never belonged to any single writer. Jamblichus, at the beginning of his treatise de Mysteries, tells us that "Hermes, who presides over speech, is, according to ancient tradition, common to all priests; he it is who exists in all of them. That is why our ancestors attributed all discoveries to him, and issued their works under the name of Hermes." There was, in fact, a long-continued series of books called "hermetic," extending over several centuries. Tertullian, however ( cont. Valent. c. 15), speaks of Hermes Trismegistus as a master in philosophy; and the extant hermetic books have, whatever their date, philosophical and spiritual relations of a very interesting kind. They belong, as is now generally agreed, to the neo-Platonic school; and gather up in a synthesis, the artificiality of which is not at first sight apparent, large elements of all the different factors of religious belief in the Roman world or the 2nd and 3rd cents. The two principal are the Ποιμάνδρης (the "Shepherd of Men"), and the Λόγος τέλειος (or "Discourse of Initiation"), otherwise called "Asclepius." These two works, together with a variety of fragments, have been translated into French by M. Louis Ménard (Paris, 1867), and accompanied with a preliminary essay of much interest on the hermetic writings and their affinities generally. His most important fragments are from a work entitled Κόρη κόσμου (the "Virgin of the World"), a dialogue between Isis and her son Horus on the origin of nature and of animated beings, including man. Other less noticeable works attributed to Hermes Trismegistus are named in D. of G. and R. Biogr. (s.v.).

It is not to be assumed that these, the Ποιμάνδρης , and Λόγος τέλειος , are by the same author; but from their great similarity of tone and thought, this is possible. Both works are quoted by Lactantius (who ascribed to them the fabulous antiquity and high authority which the early Fathers were wont to attribute to the Sibylline books); and must have been written before c. 330, when Lactantius died. The historical allusions in the Asclepius distinctly point to a time when heathenism was about to perish before the increasing power of Christianity. Hence both these works were probably written towards the close of the 3rd cent.

Three motives are discernible in them. First, the endeavour to take an intellectual survey of the whole spiritual universe, without marking any points where the understanding of man fails and has to retire unsatisfied; this is a disposition which, under different forms and at different times, has been called Pantheism or Gnosticism (though the Gnostic idea of an evil element in creation nowhere appears in these treatises). The ideas of the author are presented with a gorgeous material imagery; and, speaking generally, he regards the material world as interpenetrated by the spiritual, and almost identified with it. The power and divine character which he attributes to the sun and other heavenly bodies are peculiarly Egyptian, though this also brings him into affinity with Stoic, and even with Platonic, views. Secondly, this Pantheism or Gnosticism is modified by moral and religious elements which certainly some degree be paralleled in Plato, but to which it is difficult to avoid ascribing a Jewish and even a Christian origin. Great stress is laid on the unity, the creative power, the fatherhood and goodness of God. The argument from design also appears (Poemander, c. 5). Even the well-known terms of baptism and regeneration occur, though in different connexions, and the former in a metaphorical sense. One of the chapters of the Poemander is entitled "The Secret Sermon on the Mountain." The future punishments for wrongdoing are described with emphasis, but there is no moral teaching in detail. Thirdly, these intellectual and religious elements are associated with a passionate and vigorous defence of the heathen religion, including idol worship, and a prophecy of the evils which will come on the earth from the loss of piety. They are thus the only extant lamentation of expiring heathenism, and one that is not without pathos. But for the most part the style is hierophantic, pretentious, and diffuse. See further Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. i. pp. 46–94; Baumgarten Crusius, de Lib. Hermeticorum Origine atque Indole (Jena, 1827); and Chambers, The Theol. and Philos. Works of Her. Tris. (Edin. 1882).

[J.R.M.]

Webster's Dictionary - Hermes
(1):

(n.) See Mercury.

(2):

(n.) Originally, a boundary stone dedicated to Hermes as the god of boundaries, and therefore bearing in some cases a head, or head and shoulders, placed upon a quadrangular pillar whose height is that of the body belonging to the head, sometimes having feet or other parts of the body sculptured upon it. These figures, though often representing Hermes, were used for other divinities, and even, in later times, for portraits of human beings. Called also herma. See Terminal statue, under Terminal.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hermes, Saint
Martyr, died Rome, Italy, 132. According to legend he was a wealthy freedman; a catacomb in the Salesian Way bears his name. Relics at Acqua pendente, Salzburg, Cornelimünster, San Marco (Rome), and Seligenstadt. Feast, Roman Calendar, August 28,.

Sentence search

Mercurius - (muhr' cyoo' rih uhss) KJV translation of the Greek Hermes ( Acts 14:12 ). The Roman god Mercury was identified with the Greek Hermes. See Gods, Pagan ; Hermes
Mercury - Hermes in Acts 14:12 . Hermes, as the spokesman of the gods, was regarded by the Greeks as the god of eloquence. Hence, when Paul and Barnabas healed the cripple at Lystra, the former was hailed as Hermes, ‘because he was the chief speaker. ’ The identification of Hermes with Mercury was due to another attribute. As the messenger of the gods, Hermes was the god who brought good fortune to men
Hermes - Hermes . Hermes was a very common slave’s name (Lightfoot, Philipp , p
Hermas - Hermes
Herma - ) See Hermes, 2
Mercury - (muhr' cyoo ree) See Gods, Pagan ; Hermes
Hermes - Hermes was known as a messenger of the gods and was associated with eloquence. Paul's role as chief speaker made the Lystrans think of Hermes
Hermes - ) Originally, a boundary stone dedicated to Hermes as the god of boundaries, and therefore bearing in some cases a head, or head and shoulders, placed upon a quadrangular pillar whose height is that of the body belonging to the head, sometimes having feet or other parts of the body sculptured upon it. These figures, though often representing Hermes, were used for other divinities, and even, in later times, for portraits of human beings
Mercu'Rius - (herald of the gods ), properly Hermes, the Greek deity, whom the Romans identified with their Mercury, the god of commerce and bargains. Hermes was the son of Zeus (Jupiter) and Maia the daughter of Atals, and is constantly represented as the companion of his father in his wandering upon earth
Mercurius - The Hermes (i
Caduceus - ) The official staff or wand of Hermes or Mercury, the messenger of the gods
Hermogenes - (huhr mahj' ih neess) Personal name meaning, “born of Hermes
Mercurius, - The god Hermes of the Greeks, identified with Mercurius of the Romans
Moly - ) A fabulous herb of occult power, having a black root and white blossoms, said by Homer to have been given by Hermes to Ulysses to counteract the spells of Circe
Hermas - His name, the variant spelling of the Greek god Hermes, may indicate he was a slave, since many slaves were named for gods
Mercury - Hermes’), like ‘Jupiter’ (q. Hermes ‘is the name of a Greek god (corresponding to the Roman Mercury) whose origin and real character are perhaps more difficult to define than is the case with any other Greek deity’ (Ramsay, Encyclopaedia Britannica 9 xi. Paul, however, was dubbed ‘Hermes,’ ‘because he was the chief speaker,’ which reminds us that this deity was thought of as the god of eloquence
Hashmannim - The idol of wisdom, Hermes, Thoth, gave his name to the city; thus the derived term Hashmannim means "wisest Egyptian princes
Philippus, Bishop of Heraclea - 304 with Severus, a presbyter, and Hermes, a deacon. After some time Justinus brought them to Adrianople, and there burned Philip and Hermes on the same day (Ruinart, Acta Sincera , p
Hermetic Literature - associated with the name “Hermes Trimegistos” (Thrice-great Hermes). Poimhyandres offers to reveal to Hermes the secret nature of creation and God
Mercurius - Mercurius (mer-kû'ri-ŭs), identical with the Greek Hermes (the speaker)
Opiate - ) Inducing sleep; somniferous; narcotic; hence, anodyne; causing rest, dullness, or inaction; as, the opiate rod of Hermes
Hermetical - ) Of, pertaining to, or taught by, Hermes Trismegistus; as, hermetic philosophy
Hyacinth, Saint 11 Sep - According to their acts which, however, are considered apocryphal, they were Egyptians, probably brothers, in the service of Saint Eugenia; arrested for their faith, they were burned at the stake, as their charred remains found in the cemetery of Saint Hermes on the Via Salaria in 1845 indicate
Hermes (1) Trismegistus, Writings of Unknown Authorship - Hermes (1) Trismegistus. The name "Hermes Trismegistus" never belonged to any single writer. Jamblichus, at the beginning of his treatise de Mysteries, tells us that "Hermes, who presides over speech, is, according to ancient tradition, common to all priests; he it is who exists in all of them. That is why our ancestors attributed all discoveries to him, and issued their works under the name of Hermes. 15), speaks of Hermes Trismegistus as a master in philosophy; and the extant hermetic books have, whatever their date, philosophical and spiritual relations of a very interesting kind. Other less noticeable works attributed to Hermes Trismegistus are named in D
Garland - Mistaking the apostles for Zeus and Hermes, the priest deemed garlands a suitable gift
Mercury - ) A Latin god of commerce and gain; - treated by the poets as identical with the Greek Hermes, messenger of the gods, conductor of souls to the lower world, and god of eloquence
Pegasius, Bishop of Troas - His name was found in a previously unknown letter of the emperor Julian, first published in Hermes (1875), pp
Nebo (2) - " Answering the Egyptian "Thoth," the Greek "Hermes," "Mercury," the "inspired" interpreter or nabiy of the gods, designated in one place "inventor of the writing of the royal tablets
New Platonics - Ammonius supposed that true philosophy derived its origin and its consistence from the eastern nations, that it was taught to the Egyptians by Hermes, that it was brought from them to the Greeks, and preserved in its original purity by Plato, who was the best interpreter of Hermes and the other oriental sages
Nereus - (Other names of heathen deities borne by Christians mentioned in Romans 16 are Hermes [Romans 16:14], Phoebe, [Romans 16:1]
Hilarius, Bishop of Rome - Rusticus, metropolitan of Narbonne, had nominated his archdeacon Hermes as his successor, but had failed to obtain Leo's approval. On the death of Rusticus, Hermes had been accepted by the clergy and people of Narbonne as their metropolitan bishop. On this, Frederic, king of the West Goths, an Arian, wrote to acquaint the pope with the "wicked usurpation" and "execrable presumption" of Hermes. The matter was now brought before a synod at Rome (462), and Hermes was declared degraded from the rank of metropolitan, but allowed to retain his see
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects

Elizabeth, worshipper of God

Gabriel, strong man of God

Gamaliel, God recompenses

Heli, Jehovah is high

Jesus, Jehovah saves

John, gift of God

Matthias, gift of Jehovah

Michael, who is like God?

Nathanael, gift of God

Timothy, honoring God

Zachary, Jehovah remembers

Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly

Asyncritus, incomparable

Bernice, victorious

Clement (Latin), kind

Eunice, victorious

Pudens, modest

Timon (Hebrew), honorable

Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror

Anna, grace

Caiphas, oppressor

Judas, praise

Malchus, ruler

Manahen, comforter

Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea

Philip, lover of horses

Prochorus, leader of a chorus

Salome, peace

Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father

Joseph, whom the Lord adds

Mnason, he who remembers

Onesiphorus, bringer of profit

Philologus, lover of words

Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer

Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle

Susanna, lily

Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth

Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo

Apollyon

Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter

Epaphroditus, beautiful

Hermes

Hermogenes

Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects

Elizabeth, worshipper of God

Gabriel, strong man of God

Gamaliel, God recompenses

Heli, Jehovah is high

Jesus, Jehovah saves

John, gift of God

Matthias, gift of Jehovah

Michael, who is like God?

Nathanael, gift of God

Timothy, honoring God

Zachary, Jehovah remembers

Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly

Asyncritus, incomparable

Bernice, victorious

Clement (Latin), kind

Eunice, victorious

Pudens, modest

Timon (Hebrew), honorable

Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror

Anna, grace

Caiphas, oppressor

Judas, praise

Malchus, ruler

Manahen, comforter

Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea

Philip, lover of horses

Prochorus, leader of a chorus

Salome, peace

Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father

Joseph, whom the Lord adds

Mnason, he who remembers

Onesiphorus, bringer of profit

Philologus, lover of words

Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer

Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle

Susanna, lily

Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth

Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo

Apollyon

Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter

Epaphroditus, beautiful

Hermes

Hermogenes

Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Language - Adam Smith's Dissertation on the Formation of Languages; Harris's Hermes; Warburton's Divine Legation of Moses, vol
Interpret, Interpretation, Interpreter - Hermes, the Greek name of the pagan god Mercury, who was regarded as the messenger of the gods), denotes "to explain, interpret" (Eng
Nebaioth - ... But the mention of names resembling Adam, Seth, Enoch, Noah, Shem, Abraham, and of Hermes, Agathodaemon, Tammuz, and the Ionians, and the anachronisms geographical, linguistic, historical, and religious, point to a modern date even as late as the first century A
Lying - While Hermes, the so-called messenger of the gods, was often admired for his dexterous lying, Christ is loved because He is the Truth (John 14:6), the faithful and true Witness (Revelation 3:14), through whom men are able, amid all earthly changes and illusions, to lay hold on eternal realities
Archaeology, Christian - ... Giuseppe Marchi (1795-1860) Jesuit, proved the Christian origin of the catacombs, discovered the grave of Saint Hyacinth in the Catacomb of Saint Hermes, and inspired his famous pupil De Rossi to great achievements
Christian Archaeology - ... Giuseppe Marchi (1795-1860) Jesuit, proved the Christian origin of the catacombs, discovered the grave of Saint Hyacinth in the Catacomb of Saint Hermes, and inspired his famous pupil De Rossi to great achievements
Corinth - In the city were shrines also to Hermes, Heracles, Athena, and Poseidon
Gods, Pagan - The messenger of the Greek gods was Hermes (Roman, Mercury). When the people of Lystra assumed Barnabas and Paul to be gods (Acts 14:8-18 ), they called Paul Hermes because he was the spokesman; and they identified Barnabas with Zeus or Jupiter. Hermes was also the god of merchants and travelers
Luke - ... Lardner thinks that there are a few allusions to this Gospel in some of the apostolical fathers, especially in Hermes and Polycarp; and in Justin Martyr there are passages evidently taken from it; but the earliest author, who actually mentions St
Tongues Gift of - the Leiden papyrus, where Hermes is invoked in unintelligible symbols
Phoebe - Two men among these saluted in Romans 16 also bore the name of a god (Hermes, Romans 16:14; Nereus, Romans 16:15)
Asia Minor, Cities of - Connected by a fine road with Antioch to the west, the city honored Zeus and Hermes as patron gods
Trajanus, m. Ulpius - 18, 110, or more probably 111 (Mommsen, Hermes , 1869, 59), and the letter was probably written in the year after his arrival
Canon of the New Testament - It condemns as spurious "the Shepherd, written very recently in our own times at Rome by Hermes, while his brother Plus was bishop of the see of Rome," i
Seventy (2) - ) as follows:—James (brother of the Lord), Timothy, Titus, Barnabas, Ananias, Stephen, Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Simon, Nicolas, Parmenas, Cleopas, Silas, Silvanus, Crescens, Epenetus, Andronicus, Amplias, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Narcissus, Herodion, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Hermas, Patrobas, Rhodion, Jason, Agabus, Linus, Gaius, Philologus, Olympas, Sosipater, Lucius, Tertius, Erastus, Phygellus, Hermogenes, Dermas, Quartus, Apollos, Cephas, Sosthenes, Epaphroditus, Caesar, Marcus, Joseph Barsabbas, Artemas, Clemens, Onesiphorus, Tychicus, Carpus, Euodius, Philemon, Zenas, Aquila, Priscas, Junias, Marcus (2), Aristarchus, Pudens, Trophimus, Lucas the Eunuch, Lazarus
Stranger, Alien, Foreigner - The beautiful story of Philemon and Baucis, the aged Phrygian couple who received Zeus and Hermes into their but when others had refused to take them in (cf
Peter - Peter has always been considered as canonical; and in proof of its genuineness we may observe that it is referred to by Clement of Rome, Hermes, and Polycarp; that we are assured by Eusebius, that it was quoted by Papias; and that it is expressly mentioned by Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Origen, and most of the later fathers
Sacrifice And Offering - Paul and Barnabas at Lystra were thought to be the gods Zeus and Hermes
Mockery - ‘Jesus als Saturnalien-König’ (Hermes, xxxiii
Divination - ), and he calls Hermes ‘a magician,’ μάγον (x
Christian (the Name) - On the later use and form of the word consult Blass, Hermes (1895), p
Minucius Felix, Marcus - by Dessau ( Hermes , 1880, p
Dress - ’ Antiochus Epiphanes, it is recorded, compelled the young Jewish nobles to wear the petasus , the low, broad-brimmed hat associated with Hermes ( 2Ma 4:12 , RV [Note: Revised Version
Philo - In recent discussion the Corpus Hermeticum (or the writings collected under the name of Hermes Trismegistos) and Posidonius of A pamea are often referred to where scholars in former times would have referred to Philo
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - At the other extreme, the seventeen tractates of the Greco-Egyptian god Hermes Trismegistos argue that he is so lofty that no name is appropriate for him and that, as in rabbinic Judaism, human beings should not attempt to utter his name at all
Hellenistic And Biblical Greek - Holl† [Note: ‘Das Fortleben der Volkssprachen in Kleinasien in nachchristlicher Zeit,’ in Hermes, xliii
Gospels - 854, and known as the Muratorian Fragment), recognizes the Gospels (Luke and John, the sentences as to Matthew and Mark are obliterated) as inspired, and condemns as uninspired the Shepherd by Hermes, "written very recently in our own times," i
Thecla - After relating to him in the house of Hermaeus (or Hermes) the wonderful story of her deliverances she proceeded to Iconium receiving from him the parting charge "Go and teach (δίδασκε) the word of God
Hellenism - Not only were the Oriental gods called by Greek names (Ammon and Baal became Zeus; Melkart, Herakles; Astarte, Aphrodite; Thoth, Hermes, etc
Calendar, the Christian - He says that the fourth and sixth days are named from Hermes and Aphrodite respectively
Christ in Art - the Hermes Kriophoros bearing a ram, or the Apollo Nomios) to make it both a safe and an accessible model for Christians
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Henning, in Hermes , Vol