Character Study on Gamaliel

Character Study on Gamaliel

Numbers 1: Of the children of Joseph: of Ephraim; Elishama the son of Ammihud: of Manasseh; Gamaliel the son of Pedahzur.
Numbers 2: And by him shall be the tribe of Manasseh: and the captain of the children of Manasseh shall be Gamaliel the son of Pedahzur.
Numbers 7: On the eighth day offered Gamaliel the son of Pedahzur, prince of the children of Manasseh:
Numbers 7: And for a sacrifice of peace offerings, two oxen, five rams, five he goats, five lambs of the first year: this was the offering of Gamaliel the son of Pedahzur.
Numbers 10: And over the host of the tribe of the children of Manasseh was Gamaliel the son of Pedahzur.
Acts 5: Then stood there up one in the council, a Pharisee, named Gamaliel, a doctor of the law, had in reputation among all the people, and commanded to put the apostles forth a little space;
Acts 22: I am verily a man which am a Jew, born in Tarsus, a city in Cilicia, yet brought up in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, and taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers, and was zealous toward God, as ye all are this day.

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Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Gamaliel
Reward of God.
A chief of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:20 ; 7:54,59 ).



The son of rabbi Simeon, and grandson of the famous rabbi Hillel. He was a Pharisse, and therefore the opponent of the party of the Sadducees. He was noted for his learning, and was president of the Sanhedrim during the regins of Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius, and died, it is said, about eighteen years before the destruction of Jerusalem. When the apostles were brought before the council, charged with preaching the resurrection of Jesus, as a zealous Pharisee Gamaliel councelled moderation and calmness. By a reference to well-known events, he advised them to "refrain from these men." If their work or counsel was of man, it would come to nothing; but if it was of God, they could not destroy it, and therefore ought to be on their guard lest they should be "found fighting against God" (Acts 5:34-40 ). Paul was one of his disciples (22:3).


Holman Bible Dictionary - Gamaliel
(guh may' lih ehl) Personal name meaning, “God rewards with good.” 1. The son of Pedahzur; a leader of the tribe of Manasseh, who helped Moses take the census in the wilderness (Numbers 1:10 ). Compare Numbers 7:54-59 . 2 . A highly regarded Pharisee who was a member of the Sanhedrin (Acts 5:34 ). He squelched a plan by the Sanhedrin to kill the apostles by reminding the members that interference with what the apostles were doing might prove to be opposition to God. If the work of the apostles were a purely human work, Gamaliel said, it would come to nothing anyway. According to Acts 22:3 , this Gamaliel had been Paul's teacher. He was the grandson of the great Rabbi Hillel. He died about A.D. 52. 3. A leading Jewish rabbi in the late first and early second centuries A.D. He was the grandson of the Gamaliel mentioned in the Book of Acts. He is credited with many of the adaptations in Judaism necessitated by the destruction of the Temple in A.D. 70.



Hitchcock's Bible Names - Gamaliel
Recompense of God; camel of God
Chabad Knowledge Base - Shimeon ben Gamaliel
(d. 70 CE) Mishnaic sage, Nassi of the Sanhedrin during the years immediately preceding the of the Holy Temple. He died during the siege of Jerusalem, and was succeeded by Johanan ben Zakkai.

Chabad Knowledge Base - Shimon ben Gamaliel
(d. 70 CE) Mishnaic sage, Nassi of the Sanhedrin during the years immediately preceding the of the Holy Temple. He died during the siege of Jerusalem, and was succeeded by Johanan ben Zakkai.

Chabad Knowledge Base - Simeon ben Gamaliel ii, rabbi
(d. 70 CE) Mishnaic sage, Nassi of the Sanhedrin during the years immediately preceding the of the Holy Temple. He died during the siege of Jerusalem, and was succeeded by Johanan ben Zakkai.

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gamaliel
GAMALIEL. 1 . The son of Pedahzur, and ‘prince of the children of Manasseh’ ( Numbers 1:10 ; Numbers 2:20 , etc.). 2. Gamaliel i ., the grandson of Hillel, was a Pharisee, and regarded as one of the most distinguished doctors of the Law of his age. He was a member of the Sanhedrin during the years of our Lord’s ministry. His views were tolerant and large-hearted; he emphasized the humaner side of the Law, relaxing somewhat the rigour of Sabbatical observance, regulating the customs of divorce so as the more to protect helpless woman, and inculcating kindness on the part of Jews towards surrounding heathen. The advice given by him to the chief priests ( Acts 5:34-40 ) in reference to their dealing with the Apostles shows similar tolerance and wisdom. At his feet St. Paul was brought up ( Acts 22:3 ).

The Clementine Recognitions absurdly state that by the advice of the Apostles he remained among the Jews as a secret believer in Christ. The Mishna deplores that ‘with the death of Gamaliel i. the reverence for Divine Law ceased, and the observance of purity and piety became extinct.’

Charles T. P. Grierson.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Gamaliel
(נַּמְלִיאֵל, Γαμαλιήλ, ‘reward of God’)

1. Son of Simon and grandson of Hillel, a ‘pharisee, a doctor of the law, had in honour of all the people,’ and a member of the Sanhedrin, who intervened in the trial of St. Peter and the other apostles (Acts 5:33-39). He is also represented by the Apostle Paul as his early teacher (Acts 22:3). Gamaliel was a representative of a broader and more liberal school among the Pharisees, the school of Hillel as opposed to that of Shammai. He was interested in Greek literature and encouraged his students to study it. His teaching tended towards a broader and more spiritual interpretation of the Mosaic Law, and encouraged the Jews to friendly intercourse with foreigners, allowing poor strangers equal rights along with Jew’s to the gleanings of the corn, while he exerted himself for the relief of wives from the abuses of the law of divorce and for the protection of widows from the greed of children (Giṭṭin 32, 34). He was held in such esteem that it is related in the Mishna (Sota ix. 15), ‘with the death of Gamaliel the reverence for the law ceased and purity and abstinence died away.’

Gamaliel’s attitude towards the apostles has been variously estimated. His advice to let them alone is supported by the reason ‘if this counsel or work be of men, it will come to naught: but if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God’ (Acts 5:38-39). Some see in this the mark of a humane, tolerant, generous, liberal-minded man (C. D. Ginsburg in Kitto’s Bibl. Cycl., s.v. ‘Gamaliel i.’); others regard it as the statement of a time-server without definite convictions, and incline to compare him unfavourably not only with the apostles, but with his colleagues in the council, who were consistent and convinced traditionalists. Perhaps the view of Milligan (in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 106) is the most satisfactory. He is of the opinion that Gamaliel’s conduct is to be attributed rather to a ‘prudential dread of violent measures than to a spirit of systematic tolerance.’ The persecuting zeal of his pupil Saul of Tarsus does not seem to indicate that universal tolerance was part of the systematic teaching of Gamaliel, though a pupil may depart from the views he has been taught.

The influence which Gamaliel on this occasion exercised in the Sanhedrin has been explained by the acceptance of a Rabbinic tradition to the effect that he was president of the Sanhedrin; but not until after the destruction of Jerusalem, when the priesthood had lost its importance, do we find a Rabbi occupying this position (cf. A. Edersheim, History of the Jewish Nation, 1896, Appendix iii., p. 522ff.; also Schürer, GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4 ii. 257, 431). The influence of Gamaliel is better accounted for by the predominating influence of the Pharisaic party, which was represented in the Sanhedrin (Acts 23:6; Jos. Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii. xvii. 3, Vita, 38, 39), and also by the personal influence of the man himself. The importance of this latter factor is borne out by unanimous Rabbinic tradition and is attested by the fact that Gamaliel was the first among the seven teachers who received the title Rabban-a higher form of Rabbi, which in the form Rabboni is applied to the risen Jesus by Mary Magdalene (John 20:16). Another incident bearing upon his commanding position in the Sanhedrin is related in the Mishna (Edajoth vii. 7). The council bad recognized the need for appointing a leap-year, but, as Gamaliel was absent, resolved that their decision should take effect only if it received the subsequent sanction of their leading man.

The tradition that Gamaliel was a secret Christian and was baptized by St. Peter and St. Paul is purely legendary (cf. A. Neander, Hist. of the Planting and Training of the Christian Church, ed. Bohn, i. [1880] 46ff.). He died c. [Note: . circa, about.] a.d. 57-58.

The historical events referred to in the speech ascribed to Gamaliel in Acts 5:36 ff. have given rise to much discussion. According to St. Luke’s narrative, he speaks of a rising under Theudas as taking place before the rising of Judas of Galilee (a.d. 6). Josephus (Ant. xx. v. 1) refers to a rising under a certain Theudas which was put down by the procurator Cuspius Fadus (circa, about a.d. 46). Is the Theudas of St. Luke identical with the Theudas of Josephus? Has one or other historian erred as to his facts, or were there two risings under two men of the same name, one in a.d. 6 and the other in 46? Or are we to suppose that the whole speech of Gamaliel in Acts is unhistorical? For further discussion of these questions see article Theudas.

2. Gamaliel ii., grandson of the former and the third teacher to receive the title Rabban, the most outstanding Jewish scholar at the end of the 1st century. He presided over the court of Jabne, recognized as the highest Jewish authority of the day. He is often confused with 1 (Schürer, GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4 ii. 35).

3. Gamaliel iii., son of R. Juda-ha-Nâsi (Aboth ii. 2), the fifth scholar to receive the title Rabban. He is credited with having expressly recommended the combining of the study of the Law with manual labour or business activity (Schürer, GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4 ii. 379).

4. The last Ethnarch or Patriarch of the Jews, deposed by the Emperor Theodosian II. in the year 415 (Schürer, GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4 iii. 121).

Literature.-G. Milligan, in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. [1889] 106; C. D. Ginsburg, in Kitto’s Cyclopaedia of Biblical Literature3, ii. [1864] 60-61; E. Schürer, GJV [Note: JV Geschichte des jüdischen Volkes (Schürer).] 4, 1901-11; R. J. Knowling, Expositor’s Greek Testament , ‘Acts,’ 1900, p. 156.

W. F. Boyd.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Gamaliel
1. Numbers 1:10; Numbers 2:20; Numbers 7:54-59; Numbers 10:23.

2. A Pharisee and eminent doctor of the law, who advised the council wisely to let the apostles alone (Acts 5:34, etc.), "for if this counsel or work be of men it will come to nought; but if it be of God ye cannot overthrow it, lest haply ye be found even to fight against God." He was Paul's teacher, "at whose feet he was brought up and taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers" (Acts 22:3). The Jews celebrated him as "the glory of the law," the first designated Rabban "our master."

Son of rabbi Simeon, and grandson of Hillel; president of the Sanhedrin under Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius; he died 18 years before the fall of Jerusalem. His counsel as to the apostles was not from any leaning to Christianity, but from opposition to Sadduceeism in a case where the resurrection was the point at issue, and from seeing the folly of unreasoning bigotry (Acts 23:6-9). Saul his pupil was a leading persecutor when Stephen opposed Pharisaism; and probably Gamaliel would not altogether disapprove of his zeal in such a cause, though his own tendency was to leave the claims of Christianity to be tested by time.

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gamaliel
(Hebrew: reward of God)

A Pharisee, celebrated doctor of the Law, and teacher of Saint Paul. He counseled the Sanhedrin to put Saint Peter and the Apostles to death. According to early ecclesiastical tradition, he finally became a Christian.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gamaliel
1. Son of Pedahzur and prince of the tribe of Manasseh. Numbers 1:10 ; Numbers 2:20 ; Numbers 7:54,59 ; Numbers 10:23 .

2. Renowned doctor of the law, and member of the Sanhedrim, under whom Paul was educated. He gave the wise advice in the council that if the work of the apostles was of God it was useless to resist it; and if not, it would come to naught of itself. The Jews say he died a Pharisee, but ecclesiastical tradition records that he became a Christian. Acts 5:34 ; Acts 22:3 .

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gamaliel
Gamaliel (ga-mâ'li-el), recompense of God. 1. Son of Pedahzur; prince or captain of the tribe of Manasseh at the census at Sinai, Numbers 1:10; Numbers 2:20; Numbers 7:54; Numbers 7:59, and at starting on the inarch through the wilderness. Numbers 10:23. (b.c. 1490.) 2. A Pharisee and celebrated doctor of the law, who gave prudent worldly advice in the Sanhedrin respecting the treatment of the followers of Jesus of Nazareth. Acts 5:34 ff. (a.d. 29.) He was Paul's teacher. Acts 22:3. He is generally Identified with Gamaliel, the grandson of Hillel, who is referred to as authority in the Jewish Mishna.

The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Gamaliel
Paul's teacher of the law. His name is probably derived from Gamal, gift; and I-el, my God.

Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Gamaliel
a celebrated rabbi, and doctor of the Jewish law, under whose tuition the great Apostle of the Gentiles was brought up, Acts 22:3 . Barnabas and Stephen are also supposed to have been among the number of his pupils. Soon after the day of pentecost, when the Jewish sanhedrim began to be alarmed at the progress the Gospel was making in Jerusalem, and consequently wished to put to death the Apostles, in the hope of checking its farther progress, they were apprehended and brought before the national council, of which Gamaliel seems to have been a leading member. It is very probable that many zealots among them would have despatched the affair in a very summary manner, but their impetuosity was checked by the cool and prudent advice of Gamaliel; for, having requested the Apostles to withdraw for a while, he represented to the sanhedrim that, if the Apostles were no better than impostors, their fallacy would quickly be discovered; but on the other hand, if what they were engaged in was from God, it was vain for them to attempt to frustrate it, since it was the height of folly to contend with the Almighty. The assembly saw the wisdom of his counsel, and very prudently changed the sentence, upon which they were originally bent against the Apostles' lives, into that of corporal punishment.

2. It may here also be remarked, that the sanhedrim could not themselves believe that tale which they had diligently circulated among the people, that the disciples had stolen away the body of Jesus, and then pretended that he had arisen from the dead. If the Jewish council had thought this, it would have been very absurd in Gamaliel to exhort them to wait to see whether "the counsel and work" was of God, that is, whether the Apostles related a fact when they preached the resurrection, and grounded the divine authority of their religion upon that fact. Gamaliel's advice was wholly based upon the admission, that an extraordinary, and to them an inexplicable, event had happened.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gamaliel
A celebrated Pharisee in the generation after Christ, a doctor of the law, and member of the Sanhedrin. He possessed great influence among the Jews, and is said by some to have presided over the Sanhedrin during the reigns of Tiberius, Cains, and Claudius. The Talmundists say that he was the son of Rabbi Simeon, and grandson of Hillel, the celebrated teacher of the law, and that upon his death the glory of the law departed. His noble intervention before the Sanhedrin saved the apostles from an ignominious death, and shows that he was gifted with great wisdom and tolerance, if not strongly inclined towards the gospel, Acts 5:33-40 . The apostle Paul thought it a high honor to have been one of his pupils, Acts 22:3 , and no doubt received from him not only a zealous enthusiasm for the Jewish law, but many lessons of candor, impartiality, and liberality. His high renown, however, among the Jewish rabbins of later ages, seems inconsistent with the tradition that he embraced Christianity.

Sentence search

Pedahzur - Father of Gamaliel, of the tribe of Manasseh
Pedahzur - Rock of redemption, the father of Gamaliel and prince of Manasseh at the time of the Exodus (Numbers 1:10 ; 2:20 )
Pedahzur - ” Father of Gamaliel (Numbers 1:10 ; Numbers 2:20 ; Numbers 7:54 ,Numbers 7:54,7:59 ; Numbers 10:23 )
Theudas - An insurrectionary chieftain mentioned by Gamaliel
Theudas - Thanksgiving, referred to by Gamaliel in his speech before the council at Jerusalem (Acts 5:36 )
Gamaliel - If the work of the apostles were a purely human work, Gamaliel said, it would come to nothing anyway. According to Acts 22:3 , this Gamaliel had been Paul's teacher. He was the grandson of the Gamaliel mentioned in the Book of Acts
Gamaliel - Gamaliel (ga-mâ'li-el), recompense of God. He is generally Identified with Gamaliel, the grandson of Hillel, who is referred to as authority in the Jewish Mishna
Theudas - He was mentioned by Gamaliel before the Sanhedrim as an instance that what is not of God comes to nothing
Pedahzur - The father of Gamaliel
Gamaliel - Gamaliel. Gamaliel i . The Mishna deplores that ‘with the death of Gamaliel i
Gamaliel - Gamaliel was a representative of a broader and more liberal school among the Pharisees, the school of Hillel as opposed to that of Shammai. 15), ‘with the death of Gamaliel the reverence for the law ceased and purity and abstinence died away. ’... Gamaliel’s attitude towards the apostles has been variously estimated. ‘Gamaliel i. He is of the opinion that Gamaliel’s conduct is to be attributed rather to a ‘prudential dread of violent measures than to a spirit of systematic tolerance. ’ The persecuting zeal of his pupil Saul of Tarsus does not seem to indicate that universal tolerance was part of the systematic teaching of Gamaliel, though a pupil may depart from the views he has been taught. ... The influence which Gamaliel on this occasion exercised in the Sanhedrin has been explained by the acceptance of a Rabbinic tradition to the effect that he was president of the Sanhedrin; but not until after the destruction of Jerusalem, when the priesthood had lost its importance, do we find a Rabbi occupying this position (cf. The influence of Gamaliel is better accounted for by the predominating influence of the Pharisaic party, which was represented in the Sanhedrin (Acts 23:6; Jos. The importance of this latter factor is borne out by unanimous Rabbinic tradition and is attested by the fact that Gamaliel was the first among the seven teachers who received the title Rabban-a higher form of Rabbi, which in the form Rabboni is applied to the risen Jesus by Mary Magdalene (John 20:16). The council bad recognized the need for appointing a leap-year, but, as Gamaliel was absent, resolved that their decision should take effect only if it received the subsequent sanction of their leading man. ... The tradition that Gamaliel was a secret Christian and was baptized by St. ... The historical events referred to in the speech ascribed to Gamaliel in Acts 5:36 ff. 6 and the other in 46? Or are we to suppose that the whole speech of Gamaliel in Acts is unhistorical? For further discussion of these questions see article Theudas. Gamaliel ii. Gamaliel iii
Reputation - KJV term for high public esteem or regard applied to: Gamaliel (Acts 5:34 ); Jerusalem apostles (Galatians 2:2 ); Epaphroditus (Philippians 2:29 )
Eleazar - At the age of 18, he was appointed as head of the academy in Yavneh, replacing Rabban Gamaliel II as Nassi. Rabban Gamaliel was soon reinstated, and he and Rabbi Eleazar served jointly
Eliezer ben hyrcanus, rabbi - � Married the daughter of the Nassi, Rabbi Simeon ben Gamaliel I, established an academy in Lod, and authored the Midrashic work, Pirkei D'Rabbi Eliezer
Theudas - An insurgent, Jew, mentioned by Gamaliel, A
Gamaliel - Soon after the day of pentecost, when the Jewish sanhedrim began to be alarmed at the progress the Gospel was making in Jerusalem, and consequently wished to put to death the Apostles, in the hope of checking its farther progress, they were apprehended and brought before the national council, of which Gamaliel seems to have been a leading member. It is very probable that many zealots among them would have despatched the affair in a very summary manner, but their impetuosity was checked by the cool and prudent advice of Gamaliel; for, having requested the Apostles to withdraw for a while, he represented to the sanhedrim that, if the Apostles were no better than impostors, their fallacy would quickly be discovered; but on the other hand, if what they were engaged in was from God, it was vain for them to attempt to frustrate it, since it was the height of folly to contend with the Almighty. If the Jewish council had thought this, it would have been very absurd in Gamaliel to exhort them to wait to see whether "the counsel and work" was of God, that is, whether the Apostles related a fact when they preached the resurrection, and grounded the divine authority of their religion upon that fact. Gamaliel's advice was wholly based upon the admission, that an extraordinary, and to them an inexplicable, event had happened
ju'Das of Galilee, - 759), referred to by Gamaliel in his speech before the Sanhedrin
Theudas - The insurgent mentioned by Gamaliel as having led 400 men, boasting himself to be somebody of importance. ten years later than Gamaliel's speech. Thus, Theudas would be his name, long borne, and so best known to Gamaliel and the Sanhedrin at Jerusalem; Simon the name wherewith he set up as king, and so given by Josephus writing for Romans
Martyrs - They are: Rabban Simeon ben Gamaliel II, Rabbi Ishmael ben Elisha, Rabbi Akiba, Rabbi Hananiah ben Teradion, Rabbi Hutzpit the Interpreter, Rabbi Eleazar ben Samua, Rabbi Hananiah ben Hakinai, Rabbi Yeshevav the Scribe, Rabbi Judah ben Damah, and Rabbi Judah ben Bava
Ten martyrs - They are: Rabban Simeon ben Gamaliel II, Rabbi Ishmael ben Elisha, Rabbi Akiba, Rabbi Hananiah ben Teradion, Rabbi Hutzpit the Interpreter, Rabbi Eleazar ben Samua, Rabbi Hananiah ben Hakinai, Rabbi Yeshevav the Scribe, Rabbi Judah ben Damah, and Rabbi Judah ben Bava
Gama'Liel - He is generally identified with the very celebrated Jewish doctor Gamaliel, grandson of Hillel, and who is referred to as authority in the Jewish Mishna
Jabneel - The burial place of Gamaliel, according to Jewish tradition
Gamaliel - When the apostles were brought before the council, charged with preaching the resurrection of Jesus, as a zealous Pharisee Gamaliel councelled moderation and calmness
Scribes - The most celebrated of the scribes were Aillel, Schammai, and Gamaliel the teacher of Saint Paul the Apostle
Rabbi - ... Rabbim of schools sat upon places raised above their pupils; hence Paul declares; that his was brought up at the feet of Gamaliel
Doctor - There stood up one in the council, a Pharisee, named Gamaliel, a doctor of the law
Theudas - Mentioned by Gamaliel ( Acts 5:36 ) as the leader of an unsuccessful rebellion of 400 men. 1) speaks of a Theudas who misled the people and gave himself out for a prophet, at least ten years after Gamaliel’s speech; and also a little afterwards (§ 2) speaks of the sons of Judas the Galilæao, the instigator of a rebellion in the time of Quirinius. Luke ( Acts 5:37 ) speaks successively of Theudas and Judas, and it is alleged that he erroneously put their names into Gamaliel’s mouth owing to a misreading of Josephus
Gamaliel - Saul his pupil was a leading persecutor when Stephen opposed Pharisaism; and probably Gamaliel would not altogether disapprove of his zeal in such a cause, though his own tendency was to leave the claims of Christianity to be tested by time
Lawyer - Some would doubtless devote themselves more to one branch of activity than to another; but a 'lawyer' might also be a 'doctor,' and the case of Gamaliel shows that a 'doctor' might also be a member of the Sanhedrin, Acts 5:34 " (Eaton, in Hastings' Bib Dic
Simeon - Some have conjectured, that Simeon, who received Jesus Christ into his arms, was the same as Simeon the Just, the son of Hillel, and master of Gamaliel, whose disciple St
Pharisees - We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathæa, and Paul
Pharisees - Probably such men as Gamaliel, Nicodemus, and Saul were men of a different stamp, though all needed the regenerating power of grace to give them what they professed to seek
Reputation - Acts 5:34 speaks of Gamaliel as a νομοδιδάσκαλος τίμιος παντὶ τῶ̣ λαῶ̣
Chrysippus, Guardian of the Holy Cross - 171) records his having read in a writing of Chrysippus a statement relating to the baptism of Gamaliel and Nicodemus by SS
Schools - " The Talmud states that in Bechar there were 400 schools, having each 400 teachers, with 400 children each and that there were 4000 pupils in the house of Rabban Simeon Ben-Gamaliel
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects

Elizabeth, worshipper of God

Gabriel, strong man of God

Gamaliel, God recompenses

Heli, Jehovah is high

Jesus, Jehovah saves

John, gift of God

Matthias, gift of Jehovah

Michael, who is like God?

Nathanael, gift of God

Timothy, honoring God

Zachary, Jehovah remembers

Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly

Asyncritus, incomparable

Bernice, victorious

Clement (Latin), kind

Eunice, victorious

Pudens, modest

Timon (Hebrew), honorable

Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror

Anna, grace

Caiphas, oppressor

Judas, praise

Malchus, ruler

Manahen, comforter

Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea

Philip, lover of horses

Prochorus, leader of a chorus

Salome, peace

Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father

Joseph, whom the Lord adds

Mnason, he who remembers

Onesiphorus, bringer of profit

Philologus, lover of words

Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer

Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle

Susanna, lily

Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth

Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo

Apollyon

Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter

Epaphroditus, beautiful

Hermes

Hermogenes

Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects

Elizabeth, worshipper of God

Gabriel, strong man of God

Gamaliel, God recompenses

Heli, Jehovah is high

Jesus, Jehovah saves

John, gift of God

Matthias, gift of Jehovah

Michael, who is like God?

Nathanael, gift of God

Timothy, honoring God

Zachary, Jehovah remembers

Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly

Asyncritus, incomparable

Bernice, victorious

Clement (Latin), kind

Eunice, victorious

Pudens, modest

Timon (Hebrew), honorable

Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror

Anna, grace

Caiphas, oppressor

Judas, praise

Malchus, ruler

Manahen, comforter

Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea

Philip, lover of horses

Prochorus, leader of a chorus

Salome, peace

Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father

Joseph, whom the Lord adds

Mnason, he who remembers

Onesiphorus, bringer of profit

Philologus, lover of words

Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer

Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle

Susanna, lily

Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth

Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo

Apollyon

Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter

Epaphroditus, beautiful

Hermes

Hermogenes

Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Scribes - Thus Gamaliel advised the Sanhedrin, when the apostles were before them charged with "teaching in this name," to "refrain from these men and let them alone" (Acts 5:34-39 ; comp 23:9)
Grave-Clothes - This frequently led, however, to such unnecessary expense in the way of luxurious wrappings, that by way of protest Rabbi Gamaliel left directions that he was to be buried in simple linen garments, while his grandson limited the number of grave-clothes to one dress (see Edersheim, Sketches of Jewish Social Life, p
Trades - So with Gamaliel, a contemporary of our Lord
Stephen - He is always put at the head of the seven deacons; and it is believed he had studied at the feet of Gamaliel
Scribes - he had forced his way into that aristocratic body, the Sanhedrin (Gamaliel in Acts 5:1-42 ; Nicodemus in John 3:1-36 ; John 7:1-53 ). Such also was the Gamaliel at whose feet St
Philosophy - If the Shammai and Hillel of the Talmud are the same with the learned men mentioned in Josephus, namely, Sameas and Pollio, who flourished thirty-four years before Christ, then Shammai, or Sameas is undoubtedly the same with the Simeon who is mentioned, Luke 2:25-35 ; and his son Gamaliel, so celebrated in the Talmud, is the same with the Gamaliel mentioned, Acts 5:34 ; Acts 22:3 . Gamaliel was one of the number
Sim'Eon - 13, and whose son Gamaliel was the Pharisee at whose feet St
Bath, Bathing - an anecdote of Gamaliel ii
Theudas - In Acts 5:36 Gamaliel counsels moderation in the treatment of the Christians, citing Theudas’s career as evidence that a movement which is not of God will come to naught of itself. Josephus places him nearly forty years after Judas, and thus subsequent to the time of Gamaliel, while Acts makes Theudas precede Judas
Sanhedrin - Zakkai, Hillel’s great disciple, the new Sanhedrin was soon afterwards organized at Jabneh (Jamnia), of an entirely scholastic character, consisting only of teachers of the Law; and the form the new Sanhedrin assumed under his successor Gamaliel II. 15a, Hillel’s successor as Nâsî was his son Simon, and he was followed by his son Gamaliel I. 1), of Gamaliel 1. Gamaliel (Jos. It is, therefore, impossible to escape the conclusion that the conditions existing under Gamaliel II. Sheṭaḥ, Hillel, and Gamaliel I. It is not as president, but as the patriarch, that Gamaliel i. When Gamaliel II
Sanhedrin - The wise counsel of Gamaliel caused the council to release the apostles with a beating and a warning (Acts 5:34-42 )
Scribe - (1) Gamaliel, a scribe and the teacher of St. Paul was on his trial, the Pharisaic scribes repeated Gamaliel’s advice (Acts 23:9)
Mischna - According to Prideaux's account, they passed from Jeremiah to Baruch, from him to Ezra, and from Ezra to the men of the great synagogue, the last of whom was Simon the Just, who delivered them to Antigonus of Cocho: and from him they came down in regular succession to Simeon, who took our Saviour in his arms; to Gamaliel, at whose feet Paul was educated; and last of all, to Rabbi Judah the Holy, who committed them to writing in the Mischina
Feet - Paul can say literally that he was ‘brought up at the feet of Gamaliel’ (Acts 22:3)
Mishna - From him they came down in regular succession to Simeon, who took our Saviour in his arms; to Gamaliel, at whose feet St
Education - Yet it recognized that conduct was the true test of character; in the words of Simeon, the son of Gamaliel, that ‘not learning but doing is the chief thing. The pupils sat on the floor at the teacher’s feet, as did Saul at the feet of Gamaliel ( Acts 22:3 ). It was a grandson of the former, Gamaliel I
Paul as a Student - " Now Gamaliel would be almost sure to be one of those astonished doctors; and what more likely than that he had taken his best scholar up to the temple to explain the passover to him that day? And did not the young carpenter from Nazareth, and the young weaver from Tarsus, exchange glances of sympathy and shake hands of love that day at the gate of the temple? I, for one, will believe that they did. Perhaps the very finest mind that had been born among men since the beginning of the world entered on the study of Old Testament theology when Saul of Tarsus sat down at Gamaliel's feet. With what a hunger for his books, and with what heavenward vows and oaths of work, young Saul would set out from Tarsus to Jerusalem! Our own best students come up to our divinity seats with thrilling and thanksgiving hearts, and it is only they who have such hearts who can at all enter into Saul's mind and heart and imagination as he descended Olivet and entered Jerusalem and saw his name set down at last on Gamaliel's roll of the sons of the prophets. Gamaliel would have no trouble with Saul, unless it was to supply him with books, and to answer his questions. 'In all my experience I never had a scholar like Saul of Tarsus,' Gamaliel would often afterwards say. " And young Saul of Tarsus would be just another David Elistone in Gamaliel's school. What in the world does he mean? Strange to say, and it is something for us all to think well about, he declares to us on every autobiographic page of his, that all the time he sat at Gamaliel's feet, and for many disastrous years after that, he was in the most absolute and woe-working ignorance of the law of God. For, was it not the law of God that Gamaliel had opened his school to teach? What in the world, I ask again, can Paul mean? Have you any idea what the apostle means when he says, with such life-long shame, and such life-long remorse, that all his Jerusalem and Gamaliel days he was blind and dead in his ignorance of the law of God? It may, perhaps, help us to an understanding of what he means, if we try to mount up and to stand beside him on the far-shining heights of his exalted apostleship, and then look back from thence on his student and Pharisee days in Jerusalem
Barnabas - He was brought up with Paul at the feet of Gamaliel
Manasseh - The tribe of Manasseh came out of Egypt in number thirty-two thousand two hundred men, upward of twenty years old, under the conduct of Gamaliel, son of Pedahzur, Numbers 2:20-21
Name, Names - When we read such a list as this: Hillel, Simon, Gamaliel, Simon, Gamaliel, Simon, Judah, Gamaliel, Judah , we get the impression that the grandfather’s name was more often adopted than the father’s (cf
Paul - At a suitable age he was sent to Jerusalem to complete his education in the school of Gamaliel, the most distinguished and right-minded of the Rabbis of that age. He had profited by the instructions of Gamaliel, and became learned in the law; yielding himself to the strictest discipline of the sect of the Pharisees, he had become a fierce defender of Judaism and a bitter enemy of Christianity, Acts 8:3 26:9-11
Judas - 6, and who, according to Gamaliel, was very successful for a time, but was ultimately completely defeated
Foot - Paul was brought up at the feet of Gamaliel
Paul - But he was early sent to Jerusalem, where he was trained under the famous Gamaliel
Aloe - Gamaliel, eighty pounds of opobalsamum were used
Simeon - The notion that this Simeon is to be Identified with a Rabbi who was the son of Hillel and the father of Gamaliel i
Phar'Isees, - We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathea and Paul
Simeon - ... He is mentioned so vaguely, "a man in Jerusalem," that Lightfoot's view is hardly correct that he was president of the Sanhedrin and father of Gamaliel (Acts 5:34-40) who took so mild a view of Christianity, and that because of his religious opinions Simeon is not mentioned in the Mishna. 13; at the feet of his son Gamaliel Paul was brought up
Rab - Paul is said to have studied at the feet of Rabbi Gamaliel, Acts 22:3
Paul - " Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Sinaiticus manuscripts read "and" before "at Jerusalem") was at Jerusalem "at the feet of Gamaliel, taught according to the perfect manner of the law of the fathers" (Acts 22:3). (See Gamaliel. Gamaliel had counseled toleration (Acts 5:34-39); but his teaching of strict pharisaic legalism produced in Saul's ardent spirit persecuting zeal against opponents, "concerning zeal persecuting the church" (Philippians 3:6)
Paul - His teacher was the prominent rabbi, Gamaliel (Acts 22:3; Acts 23:6; Acts 26:5)
Education in Bible Times - Saul of Tarsus received such advanced theological training “at the feet of Gamaliel” in Jerusalem (Acts 22:3 )
Caesar - The tumult, with its accompanying bloodshed, must have been of no slight moment, when a quarter of a century thereafter Gamaliel could effectually use it in restraining the Council from slaying the Apostles
Census - That mentioned by Gamaliel, however, was a valuation as well as an enumeration, and it was called ‘the taxing’ with some reason
Sanhedrim - Gamaliel, the son and successor of Simeon, seems to have been also of a candid disposition and character
Scribes - Paul's expression that he was "brought up at the feet of Gamaliel,"... Acts 22:3
Learning - A generation later Hillel was succeeded by his perhaps more liberal grandson, Gamaliel, to whose classroom St
Paul - He was a disciple of Gamaliel and a strict Pharisee
Proselytes - Simon ben Gamaliel said: "when a pagan comes to enter the covenant we ought to stretch out, our hand to him and bring him under the wings of God" (Jost, Judenth
Burial - In the Talmud it is said, that no less than eighty pounds of spices were consumed at the funeral of rabbi Gamaliel the elder
Scribes - His grandson and successor, Gamaliel, was over his school during Christ's ministry and the early part of the Acts. Simeon, Gamaliel's son, was so but for a short time; possibly the Simeon of Luke 2:25, of the lineage of David, therefore disposed to look for Messiah in the Child of that house
Christ in Jewish Literature - Gamaliel (grandson of the Gamaliel of Acts) had dealings with Christians. Gamaliel passed to his grandson R
Apostles - Gamaliel, a member of the Sanhedrin, managed to gain freedom for the apostles, but they still suffered a beating (Acts 5:33-40 )
Name - form of מַתִּתְיָה (‘gift of Jahweh’); Γαμαλιήλ (Gamaliel), [Note: " translation="">Acts 5:34
Proselyte - Gamaliel, R
Nationality - Paul, son of Benjamin and pupil of Gamaliel as he was, drew out to the full logical issue the universal implication of the gospel
Pharisees - Hillel and Shammai were leaders of two schools of the Pharisees, differing on slight points; the Mishna refers to both (living before Christ) and to Hillel's grandson, Paul's' teacher, Gamaliel
Education (2) - Paul’s expression, ‘educated at the feet of Gamaliel’ (Acts 22:3)
Samaria, Samaritans - Rabban Gamaliel, quite in keeping with the liberal spirit he always shows (cf. To this we may add the remarkable confession of Rabban Simeon, the son of Gamaliel, who says: ‘Every command which the Cuthaeans keep they observe more strictly than the Israelites’ (Bab
Education - However this may be, schools were placed upon a satisfactory and permanent footing by Joshua bên-Gamaliel, who is said to have been high priest from a. Jesus Himself was the carpenter (Mark 6:3), and Saul of Tarsus, the scholar of Gamaliel, was a tent-maker (Acts 18:3)
Pharisees (2) - The Jewish saints in the NT, the parents of the Baptist and of our Lord, Simeon, Anna, and others, Hillel too, and Gamaliel and Jochanan ben Sakkai, were noble types of Pharisaic Jews. Gamaliel said: ‘Get thyself a teacher that thou mayest be free from doubt’ (Aboth i
Targums - In the tractate Abodah zara , 11 a , we are told that this Onkelos was the pupil of Rabbi Gamaliel the Elder, who lived in the second half of the 1st cent
Apostle - Gamaliel interposed, by his prudent and moderate counsel; and his speech had so good an effect upon the sanhedrim, that, instead of putting Peter and John to death, they scourged them, renewed their charge and threats, and then dismissed them
Paul the Apostle - He studied under the ranking rabbi of the era, Gamaliel
Political Conditions - This was the enrolment referred to by Gamaliel (Acts 5:37); and on religious as well as patriotic grounds, as seeming to involve even a competition with Jehovah for the tithes, the result was dismay on the part of the leaders of the people, and an actual revolt, headed by Judas of Gamala, who thereby founded the fanatical party of the Zealots or Cananaeans (Matthew 10:4)
Talmud - Gamaliel says until the coming of the dawn. Gamaliel’s view compared with that of another Rabbi, together with a question which remains unanswered
Paul - Here he became a pupil of the celebrated rabbi Gamaliel, and here he spent many years in an elaborate study of the Scriptures and of the many questions concerning them with which the rabbis exercised themselves
Paul - ... Paul eventually went to Jerusalem to study under the famous rabbi, Gamaliel
Sanhedrin (2) - Gamaliel was president according to the Mishna, but in Acts 5:34 he appears simply as Φαρισαιος ὀνοματι Γαμαλιήλ
Metaphor - ‘A Hebrew of the Hebrews’ who had sat at the feet of Gamaliel, a student who had absorbed much of the intellectual culture of the Greek world of his day, and a citizen of the Roman Empire, it is not surprising that all the sides of his personality have left their mark on his language
Old Testament - ... The Apostle to the Gentiles was a Pharisee ‘of the straitest sect,’ brought up at the feet of Gamaliel, and thus imbued not merely with a deep reverence and love for the Scriptures, but also with the Rabbinic method of expounding them, in entire independence of their historical setting and significance, as a store-house of separate ‘oracles,’ the manifold sense of which (literal, allegorical, rational, and mystical) was to be deduced by the interpreter’s own insight, logical acumen, or fancy, according to the rules laid down by representative Rabbis
Proverbs - Gamaliel, who advocated the study of the hokhmath Javanith
Hebrews - Paul was well acquainted with that language, for he was brought up at Jerusalem, and "at the feet of Gamaliel;" and when he had visited that city, he had addressed the Jewish multitude, who were excited against him, in their native tongue, Acts 22:1-2
Boyhood - Schürer concludes that schools were general in the time of Christ; and thinks that the tradition is by no means incredible that Joshua, the son of Gamaliel (1st cent
Paul the Apostle - ), but chiefly at Jerusalem under the Pharisee Gamaliel ( Acts 22:3 ; Acts 26:4 ; cf. ... The result of this education, in spite of Gamaliel’s liberality of thought, was to make St
Eucharist - But it must be remembered that he was educated in Jerusalem at the feet of Gamaliel
Paul - Paul laid the foundation of those literary attainments, for which he was so eminent in the future part of his life, at his native city of Tarsus; and he afterward studied the law of Moses, and the traditions of the elders, at Jerusalem, under Gamaliel, a celebrated rabbi, Acts 22:4
Paul - He learned, he says, at the feet of Gamaliel
Paul (2) - When he sat at the feet of Gamaliel, he must have heard problems discussed like the faith of Abraham, to which we have already referred, or the origin of evil desire in connexion with the Fall of man