Character Study on Claudia

Character Study on Claudia

2 Timothy 4: Do thy diligence to come before winter. Eubulus greeteth thee, and Pudens, and Linus, and Claudia, and all the brethren.

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Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Claudia
CLAUDIA . A Roman Christian, perhaps wife of Pudens and mother of Linus ( 2 Timothy 4:21 ); but Lightfoot ( Clement , i. 76) shows that this is improbable. The two former names are found in a sepulchral inscription near Rome, and a Claudia was wife of Aulus Pudens, friend of Martial. If these are identified, Claudia was a British lady of high birth; but this is very unlikely.

A. J. Maclean.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Claudia
Mentioned (2 Timothy 4:21) with Pudens, whose wife she afterward became (Martial, 4:13; 11:54); he was a Roman knight; she was a Briton, surnamed Rufina. Tacitus (Agricola, 14) mentions that territory in S.E. Britain was given to a British king, Cogilunus, for his fidelity to Rome A.D. 52, while Claudius was emperor. In 1772 a marble was dug up at Chichester (now in the gardens at Goodwood) mentioning Cogidunus, with the surname Claudius from his patron the emperor's name. Pudens is also mentioned, Cogidunus' son-in-law. Cogidunus' daughter would be Claudia, probably sent to Rome for education, as a pledge of her father's fidelity.

There she was put under the patronage of Pomponia, wife of Aulus Plautius, conqueror of Britain. Pomponia was accused of foreign superstitions A.D. 57 (Tacitus, Annals, 3:32), probably Christianity. Claudia probably learned Christianity from Pomponia, and took from her the surname of the Pomponian clan, Rufina; so we find Rufus, a Christian in Romans 16:13. Pudens in Martial, and in the inscription, appears as a pagan. He, or perhaps his friends, through fear, concealed his Christian faith. Tradition represents Timothy, Pudens' son, as taking part in converting the Britons.

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Claudia
A female Christian mentioned in 2 Timothy 4:21 . It is a conjecture having some probability that she was a British maiden, the daughter of king Cogidunus, who was an ally of Rome, and assumed the name of the emperor, his patron, Tiberius Claudius, and that she was the wife of Pudens.

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Claudia
See PUDENS.

Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Claudia
(Κλαυδία)

Claudia was a Christian lady of Rome who was on friendly terms with the Apostle Paul at the date of his second imprisonment, and who, along with Eubulus, Pudens, and Linus (qq.v. [Note: v. quœ vide, which see.] ), sends a greeting to Timothy (2 Timothy 4:21). This is all we know with any certainty regarding her. The name suggests that she belonged to the Imperial household, and various conjectures have been made as to her identity, though there is very little in the nature of certain data. Probably she was a slave, but it is not impossible that she was a member of the gens Claudia. In the Apostolic Constitutions (vii. 46) she is regarded as the mother of Linus (Λίνος ὁ Κλαυδίας). An inscription found on the road between Rome and Ostia (CIL [Note: IL Corpus Inscrip. Latinarum.] vi. 15066) to the memory of the infant child of Claudius Pudens and Claudia Quinctilla has given rise to the conjecture that this was the Claudia of St. Paul and that she was the wife of the Pudens of 2 Timothy 4:21. Another ingenious but most improbable theory identifies Claudia with Claudia Rufina, the wife of Aulns Pudens, the friend of Martial (Epigr. iv. 13, xi. 34), and thus makes her a woman of British race. This Claudia of Martial has again been identified with an imaginary Claudia suggested by a fragmentary inscription found at Chichester in 1722 which seems to record the erection of a temple by a certain Pudens with the approval of Claudius Cogidubnus, who is supposed to be a British king mentioned in Tacitus (Agricola, xiv.) and the father of the Claudia who had adopted the name (cognomen) Rufina from Pomponia the wife of Aulus Plautins, the Roman governor of Britain (a.d. 43-52). E. H. Plumptre in Ellicott’s NT Commentary (ii. 186) confidently asserts the identity of the Claudia of St. Paul with the friend of Martial and the daughter of Cogidubnus. All such identification is, however, extremely precarious. The theory that Claudia is the daughter of the British prince Caractacus who had been brought to Rome with his wife and children is a product of the inventive imagination. Lightfoot (Apostolic Fathers, I. i. 76-79) discusses the whole question of identification, and decides that, apart from the want of evidence, the position of the names of Pudens and Claudia in the text 2 Timothy 4:21 disposes of the possibility of their being husband and wife-a difficulty which Plumptre evades by the supposition that they were married after the Epistle was written. The low moral character of Martial’s friend Pudens can hardly be explained away sufficiently to make him a likely companion of St. Paul (cf. Merivale, St. Paul at Rome, 149).

Literature.-E. H. Plumptre, in Ellicott’s NT Com., 1884, vol. ii. p. 185: ‘Excursus on the later years of St. Paul’s life’; J. B. Lightfoot, Apostolic Fathers, 1890, I. i. 76-79; C. Merivale, St. Paul at Rome, 1877, p. 149; T. Lewin, Life and Epistles of St. Paul3, 1875, ii. 397; articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Encyclopaedia Biblica ; Conybeare-Howson, Life and Epistles of St. Paul, new ed., 1877, ii. 582, 594.

W. F. Boyd.

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Claudia
Claudius
Holman Bible Dictionary - Claudia
(clayyoo' dih uh) Woman who sent greetings to Timothy (2 Timothy 4:21 ).



American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Claudia
A Christian woman, probably a convert of Paul at Rome 2 Timothy 4:21 .

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Sentence search

Pudens - (Πούδης)... Pudens was a Christian of Rome who along with Eubulus, Claudia, and Linus sends greetings to Timothy (2 Timothy 4:21). He is supposed by many to have been the husband of the Claudia of the same verse and has been identified with the Pudens of Martial’s Epigrams, whose wife also bore the name Claudia (Epigr. _ Claudia
Eubulus - Associated with Pudens and Claudia. (See PUDENS; Claudia
Claudia - Claudia . The two former names are found in a sepulchral inscription near Rome, and a Claudia was wife of Aulus Pudens, friend of Martial. If these are identified, Claudia was a British lady of high birth; but this is very unlikely
Pudens - Paul as sending greetings from Rome to Timothy ( 2 Timothy 4:21 : ‘Pudens and Linus and Claudia’). Claudia
Claudia - (Κλαυδία)... Claudia was a Christian lady of Rome who was on friendly terms with the Apostle Paul at the date of his second imprisonment, and who, along with Eubulus, Pudens, and Linus (qq. Probably she was a slave, but it is not impossible that she was a member of the gens Claudia. 15066) to the memory of the infant child of Claudius Pudens and Claudia Quinctilla has given rise to the conjecture that this was the Claudia of St. Another ingenious but most improbable theory identifies Claudia with Claudia Rufina, the wife of Aulns Pudens, the friend of Martial (Epigr. This Claudia of Martial has again been identified with an imaginary Claudia suggested by a fragmentary inscription found at Chichester in 1722 which seems to record the erection of a temple by a certain Pudens with the approval of Claudius Cogidubnus, who is supposed to be a British king mentioned in Tacitus (Agricola, xiv. ) and the father of the Claudia who had adopted the name (cognomen) Rufina from Pomponia the wife of Aulus Plautins, the Roman governor of Britain (a. 186) confidently asserts the identity of the Claudia of St. The theory that Claudia is the daughter of the British prince Caractacus who had been brought to Rome with his wife and children is a product of the inventive imagination. 76-79) discusses the whole question of identification, and decides that, apart from the want of evidence, the position of the names of Pudens and Claudia in the text 2 Timothy 4:21 disposes of the possibility of their being husband and wife-a difficulty which Plumptre evades by the supposition that they were married after the Epistle was written
Pudens - (See Claudia
Pudens - (See Claudia
Pudens - Perhaps the husband of Claudia mentioned in 2 Timothy 4:21
Eubulus - Paul and Timothy, Eubulus was present with the Apostle in Rome during his last imprisonment, and along with Claudia, Pudens, and Linus sent greetings to Timothy (2 Timothy 4:21)
Claudia - Cogidunus' daughter would be Claudia, probably sent to Rome for education, as a pledge of her father's fidelity. Claudia probably learned Christianity from Pomponia, and took from her the surname of the Pomponian clan, Rufina; so we find Rufus, a Christian in Romans 16:13
Ancyra, Seven Martyrs of - Among the earliest victims were the seven virgins, Tecusa, Alexandra, Faina, Claudia, Euphrasia, Matrona, Julitta
Constantius i, Flavius Valerius, Emperor - 305, 306, father of Constantine the Great, son of Eutropius, of a noble Dardanian family, by Claudia, daughter of Crispus, brother of the emperors Claudius II
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - The access however of Onesiphorus, Linus, Pudens, and Claudia to him proves he was not in the Mamertine or Tullianum prison, with Peter, as tradition represents; but under military custody, of a severer kind than at his first imprisonment (2 Timothy 1:16-18; 2 Timothy 2:9; 2 Timothy 4:6-8; 2 Timothy 4:16-17). Onesiphorus, undeterred by danger, sought out and visited him; Linus also, the future bishop of Rome, Pudens a senator's son and Claudia the British princess, and Tychicus before he was sent to Ephesus. (See LINUS; PUDENS; Claudia Possibly Tychicus was bearer of the epistle as of epistles to Ephesians (Ephesians 6:21-22) and Colossians (Colossians 4:7-8), since "to thee" in 2 Timothy 4:12 is not needed for this view if Timothy was at the time not at Ephesus itself
Timothy - " Among his friends who send greetings to him were the Roman noble, Pudens, the British princess Claudia, and the bishop of Rome, Linus. (See PUDENS; Claudia; LINUS
Pilate, Pontius - But at this moment his wife (Claudia Procula) sent a message to him imploring him to have nothing to do with the "just person
Pilate - )... He had a fear of offending the Jews, who already had grounds of accusation against him, and of giving color to a charge of lukewarmness to Caesar's kingship, and on the other hand a conviction of Jesus' innocence (for the Jewish council, Pilate knew well, would never regard as criminal an attempt to free Judas from Roman dominion), and a mysterious awe of the Holy Sufferer and His majestic mien and words, strengthened by his wife's (Claudia Procula, a proselyte of the gate: Evang
Augustus - Servilius Isauricus, but he broke off this engagement, and for political reasons married Claudia, step-daughter of Mark Antony, in her extreme youth
Tiberius - The Emperor Tiberius belonged to the family of the Claudii Nerones, a branch of the patrician gens Claudia which separated from the original family about the middle of the 3rd cent. Thus it came about that the Claudian house supplied so many of the early Emperors