Character Study on Blastus

Character Study on Blastus

Acts 12: And Herod was highly displeased with them of Tyre and Sidon: but they came with one accord to him, and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace; because their country was nourished by the king's country.

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Easton's Bible Dictionary - Blastus
Chamberlain to king Herod Agrippa I. (Acts 12:20 ). Such persons generally had great influence with their masters.

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Blastus
Herod Agrippa I's chamberlain; mediator between him and the people of Tyre and Sidon, who made him their friend (Acts 12:20).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Blastus
(blass' tuhss) Personal name meaning, “sprout.” Official under Herod Agrippa I (A.D. 37-44). Won over by citizens of Tyre and Sidon, he tried to help them make peace with Herod. Herod's ensuing speech let him assume the role of God over the people, resulting in God striking him dead (Acts 12:20-23 ).



Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Blastus
BLASTUS . A chamberlain of Agrippa I., through whose intervention the people of Tyre and Sidon secured a hearing at Cæsarea ( Acts 12:20 ).

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Blastus
Chamberlain of Herod Agrippa I: Acts 12:20 .

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Blastus
That buds or brings forth
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Blastus
Blastus, a chamberlain of Herod Agrippa I., is mentioned in Acts 12:20 in connexion with an embassy which the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon sent to Herod at Caesarea in order to obtain terms of peace. The ambassadors obtained an audience of the prince through the influence of Blastus, who no doubt had been liberally bribed for his services. The incident of the embassy is not mentioned by Josephus nor is the name of Blastus, and this omission has been regarded by some (e.g. Krenkel) as throwing doubt on St. Luke’s narrative, while others regard the incident as a proof of St. Luke’s independence, or as an intentional supplement to the account of the Jewish historian.

W. F. Boyd.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Blastus
A chamberlain of Herod Agrippa, bribed to favor the men of Tyre and Sidon, Acts 12:20 .

Sentence search

Blastus - Blastus, a chamberlain of Herod Agrippa I. The ambassadors obtained an audience of the prince through the influence of Blastus, who no doubt had been liberally bribed for his services. The incident of the embassy is not mentioned by Josephus nor is the name of Blastus, and this omission has been regarded by some (e
Blastus - Blastus
Chamberlain - On the other hand Blastus was chamberlain (epi tou koitonos tou basileos ) in a different sense, namely, over the king's bedchamber, a post of honor and intimacy (Acts 12:20)
Chamberlain, - The office held by Blastus, "the king's chamberlain," was entirely different from this
Chamberlain - Blastus, Herod's "chamberlain" (Acts 12:20 ), was his personal attendant or valet-de-chambre
Chamberlain - The importance of the position is indicated by the fact that the people of Tyre and Sidon sought the favor of Herod Agrippa through the mediation of Blastus, Acts 12:20
Chamberlain - Blastus, "the king's chamberlain," mentioned in Acts 12:20
Chamberlain - The only person clearly designated as such in the NT is Blastus, ὁ ἐπὶ τοῦ κοιτῶνος τοῦ βασιλέως (sc
Chamberlain - In NT at Acts 12:20 it is said that the people of Tyre and Sidon sought the favour of Herod Agrippa through the mediation of Blastus ‘the king’s chamberlain,’ showing that the office was one of considerable influence
Theodotus of Byzantium - He comes immediately after Blastus, whom we otherwise know to have caused schism in Victor's time by endeavouring to introduce the Quartodeciman usage in Rome
Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons - 20), which seems to have referred to the same subject, was entitled περὶ σχίσματος and addressed to Blastus, head of the Roman Quartodecimans. ... If Eusebius is right in making the deposition of the Roman presbyter Blastus contemporaneous with that of Florinus, the epistle addressed to the former by Irenaeus and entitled περὶ σχίσματος (Eus. Blastus was, according to Eusebius, the head of the Roman Montanists ( H. 251); it is therefore quite credible that Blastus, as a Montanist, may have conformed to Quartodeciman practice, and, as a member of the Roman presbytery, may have sought to introduce it into Rome. But if Blastus be the one referred to in another Syriac fragment (Fragm. Victor's responding to any attempt on Blastus's part to create a schism in the Roman church by introducing the Asiatic custom, with deposition from the presbyteral office. These ecclesiastical troubles moved the man of peace, Irenaeus, to send letters of remonstrance to both Blastus and bp. 24) that Irenaeus wrote on the same subject to several persons, it is possible that this Alexandrian may have been another than Blastus
Eleutherus, Bishop of Rome - Florinus and Blastus also, two degraded presbyters of Rome, broached during the episcopate of Eleutherus certain heresies, of which nothing is known except what may be gathered from the titles of certain lost treatises written against them by Irenaeus (Eus
Friends Friendship - Paul in an hour of peril at Ephesus, Acts 27:3 friends of the same Apostle at Sidon; Acts 12:20 reveals Blastus in the character of ‘a friend at court
House - Thus the ‘bed-chamber’ (κοιτών, Acts 12:20) of which Blastus was guardian would be unusual except in a great house such as that of Herod
Herod - The authorities of Tyre and Sidon offended him, "but came with one accord and, having made Blastus the king's chamberlain their friend, desired peace because their country" was dependent on the king's country for grain, etc
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - ] who claimed some connexion with Leucius, which Pacian denied; and the natural interpretation of his words seems to be that he regarded Leucius as an orthodox Christian to whom the Montanists tried to attach their origin; but the passage is obscure:... ‘Et primum hi plurimis utuntur auctoribus; nam puto et Graecus Blastus ipsorum est
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - Other Marcionite teachers mentioned are Prepo, an Assyrian, by Hippolytus, Lucanus by Tertullian; Pitho and Blastus (the latter probably erroneously) by Theodoret ( Haer