Character Study on Ben-hadad

Character Study on Ben-hadad

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Easton's Bible Dictionary - Ben-hadad



The king of Syria whom Asa, king of Judah, employed to invade Israel (1 Kings 15:18 ).



Son of the preceding, also king of Syria. He was long engaged in war against Israel. He was murdered probably by Hazael, by whom he was succeeded (2 Kings 8:7-15 ), after a reign of some thirty years.



King of Damascus, and successor of his father Hazael on the throne of Syria (2 Kings 13:3,4 ). His misfortunes in war are noticed by (Amos 1:4 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Ben-hadad
("son" i.e. "worshipper" of Hadad"), the Syrian sun-god. A name common to three kings of Damascus. Hadad-ezer ("Hadad helps") is a similar Syrian name. David, having conquered him, put garrisons in Syria of Damascus; Rezon retook Damascus, and reigned there "an adversary to Israel all the days of Solomon" (1 Kings 11:23). Ben-Hadad I grandson of Rezon (probably), as king in Damascus, which had absorbed by that time the petty kingdoms around, helped Baasha against (See ASA king of Judah. But the latter, by a present of "all the silver and gold left in the treasures of the Lord's house and of the king's house," tempted Ben-Hadad to "break his league with Baasha" (1 Kings 15:18-19). He therefore "smote Ijon, Dan, Abel-beth-Maachah, Cinneroth, with all Naphtali" in the northern kingdom, namely, that of the ten tribes under Baasha, thus enabling Asa to take away the stones of Ramah, which Baasha had built to prevent any repairing from the northern to the southern kingdom, Judah.

Ben-Hadad II, son of Ben-Hadad I; 32 vassal kings accompanied him in his first siege of Samaria (1 Kings 20:1) (See AHAB.) After Ahab's death, Moab having revolted from Ahaziah and Jehoram, successive kings of Israel (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 1:6-7), Ben-Hadad took advantage of Israel's consequent weakness, and after having been baffled several times by Elisha besieged Samaria a second time so straitly that mothers gave their own sons to be eaten, a horror similar to what occurred in later times in Titus' siege of Jerusalem. A sudden panic, owing to a divinely sent noise, caused the Syrians to flee from their camp, and leave its rich contents to be spoiled, under the impression that Israel had hired the Hittite and Egyptian kings. The consequent plenty had been foretold by Elisha.

Shortly after Ben-Hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael with large presents to consult Elisha who was in Damascus (2 Kings 8:7-15). The prophet replied, "Thou mayest certainly recover," i.e. the disease is not mortal; "howbeit the Lord hath showed me that he shall surely die." Hazael's latent cruelty and ambition were awakened by what ought to have awakened remorse, Elisha's tears at the horrors which the prophet foresaw he would perpetrate. His murder of Ben-Hadad with a wet cloth (the wetting solidifying the cloth, and making it impervious to air) was consonant to his subsequent bloodthirstiness. Hazael is evidently the subject of 2 Kings 8:15; the introduction of his name at the end does not disprove this: it is introduced to emphasize Hazael's succession to the throne, in contrast to Ben-Hadad's decease. Many fancy the wet cloth was put on to cool the fevered face, and by Ben-Hadad himself, and that death naturally resulted from the sudden chill. (?) So ended with Ben-Hadad, after reigning about 30 years, the dynasty founded by Rezon.

Ben-Hadad III, Hazael's son and successor. Jehovah, moved by Jehoahaz' repentance of his previous wickedness, and by his beseeching prayers, and by the oppression suffered by his people from Hazael, "who had made them like the dust by threshing," gave Israel a savior from Ben-Hadad in Joash his son's days. Joash, visiting Elisha on his deathbed, by his direction shot arrows eastward, the pledge of the Lord's deliverance from Syria. But instead of smiting the ground repeatedly he only smote thrice from want of faith; so, instead of destroying the Syrians as he might have done, he only was to smite them thrice, which he did in Aphek (2 Kings 13:14-19) in the Esdraelon plain, where Ahab had defeated Ben-Hadad I (1 Kings 20:26); compare Amos 1:3-4, which foretells Ben-Hadad's overthrow. Jeroboam II completed Israel's deliverance, according to Jonah's prophecy (2 Kings 14:25).

Holman Bible Dictionary - Ben-hadad
(behn-hay' dad) Personal name or royal title meaning, “son of (the god) Hadad.” Biblical references to Israel's interaction with Damascus and other city-states in Syria show the power of the kings of Damascus. The kings either bore a title, “ben-hadad,” son of the God, much like Israel's kings seem to have been called “son of God” at their coronation (Psalm 2:7 ) and as emperors of Rome were called caesars, or Ben-hadad was the personal name of several kings. Biblical and Near Eastern records reveal the following Ben-hadads.

1. Answered call for help from King Asa of Judah (917-876 B.C.) to deliver Judah from Baasha, king of Israel (908-886 B.C.) Ben-hadad then conquered territory from Israel (1 Kings 15:16-20 ). 2 . Set up memorial to Melkart, god of Tyre, near Aleppo after 900 B.C. 3. Proudly ravaged Israel, besieged Samaria, and demanded impossible tribute. King Ahab of Israel (874-853 B.C.) gathered army and acted on word of prophet to defeat drunken Ben-hadad (1 Kings 20:1-20 ). Another prophetic word led Ahab to victory when Ben-hadad attacked Israel at Aphek (1 Kings 20:22-30 ). Then Ben-hadad got covenant agreement with Ahab, bringing prophetic judgment on Ahab (1 Kings 20:31-43 ). 4 . Hadad-ezer who joined Ahab and other Syrian kings fighting Shalmaneser III of Assyria at Qarqar in 853 B.C. 5. Sought to capture Elisha for telling his plans to king of Israel, but through God's miracle had his troops blinded and led captive to Samaria (2 Kings 6:8-23 ). When this Ben-hadad besieged Samaria again, God through Elisha caused him to think Hittites and Egyptians were attacking him. He lifted the siege and retreated home (2 Kings 6:24-7:16 ). As Elisha predicted, Hazael, a Syrian officer, killed Ben-hadad (2 Kings 8:7-15 ). 6 . Led a league of kings against Zakir, king of Hamath, after 800 B.C. and was defeated. 7. Son of Hazael who fought Jehoash, king of Israel (2 Kings 13:3 , 2 Kings 13:24-25 ).

Quite possibly, some of these actions were done by the same Ben-hadad. Sufficient records are not available to be sure. See Damascus ; Syria .



Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ben-hadad
BEN-HADAD . The name of three kings of Damascus in the 9th cent. b.c.

1. Benhadad I ., the son of Tab-rimmon of Damascus. At the instance of Asa of Judah he intervened against Baasha of Israel, and took from him valuable territory on his northern border. For this service Benhadad received from Asa costly treasures from the Temple and royal palace ( 1 Kings 15:17-20 ).

2. Benhadad II ., son of the preceding, was an able general and statesman. He was at the head of a league of western princes who successfully opposed the attempts of Shalmaneser II. of Assyria to conquer southern Syria. At the battle of Karkar in b.c. 854 he had Ahab of Israel as one of his chief allies. In his time war with Israel was the rule, he being usually successful. But Ahab was more fortunate in the campaigns of 856 and 855, which were followed by a treaty of peace with concessions to Israel ( 1 Kings 20:1-43 ). On the resumption of hostilities in the third year thereafter, Benhadad was victorious ( 1 Kings 22:1-53 ). He was assassinated by the usurper Hazael about b.c. 843 ( 2 Kings 8:15 ).

3. Benhadad III ., son of Hazael, probably the same as the Man’ of the Assyrian inscriptions. Under him Damascus lost his father’s conquests in Palestine ( 2 Kings 13:24 f.), and he also suffered heavily from the Assyrians.

J. F. McCurdy.

American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ben-hadad
1. A king of Dama scene Syria, hired by Asa king of Judah to make war upon Baasha king of Israel, 1 Kings 15:18-22 . He ravaged a large part of Naphtali.

2. Son and successor of the preceding. In two successive years he raised large armies, and made war upon Ahab king of Israel. He was utterly routed by the aid of Jehovah, God of the hills and the plains also, 1 Kings 20:1-43 . Ahab spared him, contrary to the command of God and gave him conditions of peace. These do not seem to have been fulfilled, for three years after, Ahab renewed the war and was slain, 1 Kings 22:1-53 After about nine years, Ben-hadad again invaded Israel, and the prophet Elisha was instrumental in frustrating his plans, 2 Kings 6:8-23 . But once more renewing the war, he laid siege to Samaria, and reduced it to extremities by famine. God sent a sudden panic upon his army by night, and they fled precipitately, 2 Kings 6:17 7:6 Proverbs 28:1 . Shortly before his death, Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to ask the prophet Elisha, then at Damascus, what the issue would be. The prophet answered that the disease was not mortal, and yet he would surely die; a paradox which Hazael soon after solved by stifling his master in bed, 2 Kings 8:7-15

3. Son of the Hazael just named. His father had greatly afflicted and oppressed Israel; but he lost all that his father had gained, being thrice defeated by king Jehoash, 2 Kings 13:1-25 .

Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ben-hadad
Three Syrian kings in the Bible story had the name Ben-hadad. The first cooperated with Judah’s king Asa in attacking Israel’s king Baasha (1 Kings 15:16-22). The second fought with the Israelite kings Ahab and Joram (or Jehoram). (1 Kings 20:1-34; 2 Kings 6:24-33; 2 Kings 7), but was later assassinated by Hazael, one of his generals (2 Kings 8:8-15). The third, who was Hazael’s son and successor, began with some victories over Israel, but later lost to Israel repeatedly (2 Kings 13:3; 2 Kings 13:24-25; Amos 1:4). For further details see SYRIA.

Sentence search

Ben-Hadad - The kings either bore a title, “Ben-hadad,” son of the God, much like Israel's kings seem to have been called “son of God” at their coronation (Psalm 2:7 ) and as emperors of Rome were called caesars, or Ben-hadad was the personal name of several kings. Biblical and Near Eastern records reveal the following Ben-hadads. ) Ben-hadad then conquered territory from Israel (1 Kings 15:16-20 ). ) gathered army and acted on word of prophet to defeat drunken Ben-hadad (1 Kings 20:1-20 ). Another prophetic word led Ahab to victory when Ben-hadad attacked Israel at Aphek (1 Kings 20:22-30 ). Then Ben-hadad got covenant agreement with Ahab, bringing prophetic judgment on Ahab (1 Kings 20:31-43 ). When this Ben-hadad besieged Samaria again, God through Elisha caused him to think Hittites and Egyptians were attacking him. As Elisha predicted, Hazael, a Syrian officer, killed Ben-hadad (2 Kings 8:7-15 ). ... Quite possibly, some of these actions were done by the same Ben-hadad
Tabrimon - Father of Ben-hadad 1, king of Syria
Ben-ha'Dad - Ben-hadad II. Soon after Ben-hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael to consult Elisha as to the issue of his malady. On the day after Hazael's return Ben-hadad was murdered, probably by some of his own servants. (2 Kings 8:7-15 ) Ben-hadad's death was about B. Ben-hadad III. (2 Kings 13:17,25 ) The date of Ben-hadad III is B
Hezion - Vision, the father of Tabrimon, and grandfather of Ben-hadad, king of Syria (1 Kings 15:18 )
Ben-Hadad - Ben-hadad I grandson of Rezon (probably), as king in Damascus, which had absorbed by that time the petty kingdoms around, helped Baasha against (See ASA king of Judah. But the latter, by a present of "all the silver and gold left in the treasures of the Lord's house and of the king's house," tempted Ben-hadad to "break his league with Baasha" (1 Kings 15:18-19). ... Ben-hadad II, son of Ben-hadad I; 32 vassal kings accompanied him in his first siege of Samaria (1 Kings 20:1) (See AHAB. ) After Ahab's death, Moab having revolted from Ahaziah and Jehoram, successive kings of Israel (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 1:6-7), Ben-hadad took advantage of Israel's consequent weakness, and after having been baffled several times by Elisha besieged Samaria a second time so straitly that mothers gave their own sons to be eaten, a horror similar to what occurred in later times in Titus' siege of Jerusalem. ... Shortly after Ben-hadad fell sick, and sent Hazael with large presents to consult Elisha who was in Damascus (2 Kings 8:7-15). His murder of Ben-hadad with a wet cloth (the wetting solidifying the cloth, and making it impervious to air) was consonant to his subsequent bloodthirstiness. Hazael is evidently the subject of 2 Kings 8:15; the introduction of his name at the end does not disprove this: it is introduced to emphasize Hazael's succession to the throne, in contrast to Ben-hadad's decease. Many fancy the wet cloth was put on to cool the fevered face, and by Ben-hadad himself, and that death naturally resulted from the sudden chill. (?) So ended with Ben-hadad, after reigning about 30 years, the dynasty founded by Rezon. ... Ben-hadad III, Hazael's son and successor. Jehovah, moved by Jehoahaz' repentance of his previous wickedness, and by his beseeching prayers, and by the oppression suffered by his people from Hazael, "who had made them like the dust by threshing," gave Israel a savior from Ben-hadad in Joash his son's days. But instead of smiting the ground repeatedly he only smote thrice from want of faith; so, instead of destroying the Syrians as he might have done, he only was to smite them thrice, which he did in Aphek (2 Kings 13:14-19) in the Esdraelon plain, where Ahab had defeated Ben-hadad I (1 Kings 20:26); compare Amos 1:3-4, which foretells Ben-hadad's overthrow
Tab'Rimon - good is Rimmon , the Syrian god) the father of Ben-hadad I
Tabri(m)Mon - ” Father of king Ben-hadad of Damascus (1 Kings 15:18 )
he'Zion - (vision ), a king of Aram (Syria), father of Tabrimon and grandfather of Ben-hadad I
Ijon - A ruin, a city of Naphtali, captured by Ben-hadad of Syria at the instance of Asa (1 Kings 15:20 ), and afterwards by Tiglath-pileser of Assyria (2 Kings 15:29 ) in the reign of Pekah; now el-Khiam
Hazael - When Elisha visited Damascus, and Ben-hadad, who was sick, had sent Hazael, a trusted servant, to inquire whether he should recover, Elisha intimated his approaching sovereignty. The next day, however, Ben-hadad died, apparently by Hazael's hand, though some question this; and Hazael succeeded as king; and his reign, with the exception of the time when he was called on to defend himself against the Assyrian power, was occupied with continual wars upon Israel and even against Judah. He was succeeded by his son, Ben-hadad II
Abel (of) Beth-Maacah - Where Sheba took refuge from Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:14-18 ); it was captured by Ben-hadad ( 1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser ( 2 Kings 15:29 ); corresponding to the modern Abil , west of Tell el-Kadi , and north of Lake Huleh
Abel-Beth-Maachah - It was at tacked by Joab, 2 Samuel 20:14-15 : by Ben-hadad, 1 Kings 15:20; and by Tiglath-Pileser, 2 Kings 15:29
Micaiah - Three years after the great battle with Ben-hadad (20:29-34), Ahab proposed to Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, that they should go up against Ramoth-Gilead to do battle again with Ben-hadad
i'Jon - It was taken and plundered by the captains of Ben-hadad, ( 1 Kings 15:20 ; 2 Chronicles 16:4 ) and a second time by Tiglath-pileser
Naaman - The highly esteemed general of Ben-hadad, king of Damascene Syria in the time of Joram king of Israel. With respect to his attending Ben-hadad while in the temple of Rimmon, the prophet gave him no precise rule; discerning, we may suppose, a growing fear and love of God which would preserve him from all even outward homage to the idol
a'Hab - Ahab undertook three campaigns against Ben-hadad II. In the first Ben-hadad laid siege to Samaria, but was repulsed with great loss. (1 Kings 20:1-21 ) Next year Ben-hadad again invaded Israel by way of Aphek, on the east of Jordan; yet Ahab's victory was so complete that Ben-hadad himself fell into his hands, but was released contrary to God's will, (1 Kings 20:22-34 ) on condition of restoring the cities of Israel, and admitting Hebrew commissioners into Damascus
Ahab - He undertook three campaigns against Ben-hadad II. In the first two, which were defensive, he gained a complete victory over Ben-hadad, who fell into his hands, and was afterwards released on the condition of his restoring all the cities of Israel he then held, and granting certain other concessions to Ahab. After three years of peace, for some cause Ahab renewed war (1Kings 22:3) with Ben-hadad by assaulting the city of Ramoth-gilead, although the prophet Micaiah warned him that he would not succeed, and that the 400 false prophets who encouraged him were only leading him to his ruin
Hazael - When an officer of Ben-hadad, he was sent to Elisha (who was visiting Damascus) to know whether Ben-hadad should recover of his sickness. From time to time God gave His people relief, but they turned not from their evil ways, and the oppression was renewed with varying success by Hazael's son, Ben-hadad III
Benhadad - Ahab called him 'brother,' and spared his life, for which he was rebuked by a prophet: God had devoted Ben-hadad to death and Ahab's life should go for his life. Afterwards when Ben-hadad was sick he sent Hazael to Elisha, who had come to Damascus, to know whether he would recover. Because of Israel's sin, God delivered them into the hands of this king; but eventually Ben-hadad was defeated three times and the cities of Israel were recovered
Hezion - ” Grandfather of King Ben-hadad of Damascus (1 Kings 15:18 )
Samaria - We gather from 1 Kings 20:34 that Ben-hadad i. Ben-hadad ii. The city was again besieged in his time by Ben-hadad ii
Hazael - ) by murdering Ben-hadad ii. (Hazael’s successor was probably Ben-hadad iii. The next mention of him describes how Ben-hadad, Hazael’s predecessor, who is ill, sends Hazael to Elisha, to inquire whether he will recover ( 2 Kings 8:7 ff
Hazael - Whom God beholds, an officer of Ben-hadad II. 886-840), and was succeeded on the throne by his son Ben-hadad (2 Kings 13:22-25 ), who on several occasions was defeated by Jehoash, the king of Israel, and compelled to restore all the land of Israel his father had taken
Haz'a-el - He appears to have been previously a person in a high position at the court of Ben-hadad, and was sent by his master to Elisha to inquire if he would recover from the malady under which he was suffering. Elisha's answer led to the murder of Ben-hadad by his ambitious servant, who forthwith mounted the throne
Dove (2) - In the siege of Samaria by Ben-hadad, a fourth part of a cab of dove's dung was sold for five shekels
Abel-Beth-Maachah or Abel-Beth-Maacah - Ben-hadad, king of Syria, answered the call for help of Asa, king of Judah (913-873), and conquered Abel-beth-Maachah from Baasha, king of Israel (1 Kings 15:20 )
Ijon - ” Place in northern Israel captured by King Ben-hadad of Damascus as a result of his agreement with King Asa of Judah (910-869 B
Ben-Hadad - Three Syrian kings in the Bible story had the name Ben-hadad
Ben-Hadad - These do not seem to have been fulfilled, for three years after, Ahab renewed the war and was slain, 1 Kings 22:1-53 After about nine years, Ben-hadad again invaded Israel, and the prophet Elisha was instrumental in frustrating his plans, 2 Kings 6:8-23 . Shortly before his death, Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to ask the prophet Elisha, then at Damascus, what the issue would be
Damascus - Ben-hadad strengthened Damascus to the point that Asa, king of Judah (910-869), paid him tribute to attack Baasha, king of Israel, and relieve pressure on Judah (1 Kings 15:16-23 ). ... 1 Kings 20:1 also features Ben-hadad of Damascus, giving reason to believe that Ben-hadad (literally, “son of Hadad”) was a royal title in Syria, identifying the king of Damascus as a worshiper of the god Hadad, another name for Baal. Elisha helped deliver Samaria when Ben-hadad besieged it (2 Kings 6-7 ). Shalmaneser III of Assyria (858-824) claimed to have defeated both Ben-hadad and Hazael. His son Ben-hadad maintained Damascus' strength (2 Kings 13:3-25 ). Amos the prophet condemned Damascus and its kings Hazael and Ben-hadad (Amos 1:3-5 )
ba'Asha - He was defeated by the unexpected alliance of Asa with Ben-hadad I
Help - ... Help or aid comes from a variety of sources: Thirty-two kings “helped” Ben-hadad (1 Kings 20:6); one city “helps” another (Josh
Samaria - Ben-hadad, king of Syria, besieged Samaria in the reign of Ahab, but by the intervention of God it was not taken. In the days of Jehoram it was again besieged by Ben-hadad, and the famine became so great that they were on the point of capitulating when some lepers brought word that the enemy had fled, and abundance of provision was to be found in the camp
Chinnereth - The city apparently gave its name to the Sea and to the surrounding region with its several bays, thus explaining the plural form in 1 Kings 15:20 , which tells of Ben-hadad of Syria defeating the area in answer to the request of King Asa of Judah
na'Aman - " (Luke 4:27 ) Naaman was commander-in-chief of the army of Syria, and was nearest to the person of the king, Ben-hadad II. Whatever the particular exploit referred to was, it had given Naaman a great position at the court of Ben-hadad
ra'Moth-Gil'Ead - (1 Kings 4:13 ) During the invasion related in (1 Kings 15:20 ) or some subsequent incursion, this important place had seized by Ben-hadad I
Damascus - ... A few years later Ben-hadad was induced by Judah to attack Baasha king of Israel, when all the land of Naphtali was smitten. besieged Samaria; but God wrought for their deliverance, and Ben-hadad was taken prisoner; but Ahab called him 'brother' and released him, for which he was rebuked by a prophet. 890 Hazael murdered Ben-hadad and became king of Syria; and we read that Jehovah began to cut Israel short and He used Hazael as His instrument. Ben-hadad III
Hanani - ) for paying tribute to King Ben-hadad of Damascus rather than relying on God (2 Chronicles 16:7 )
Devour - I will send a fire into the house of Hazael, which shall devour the palaces of Ben-hadad
Province -
In the Old Testament this word appears in connection with the wars between Ahab and Ben-hadad
Naaman - Naaman was commander-in-chief of the army of Syria, and was nearest to the person of the king, Ben-hadad II
Hazael - While an officer of Ben-hadad, king of Syria, Hazael was sent to Elisha the prophet to inquire about the king's health (2 Kings 8:7-15 )
Ben-Hadad - Ben-hadad
jo'Ash - with 2 Kings 12:1 ; 13:10 When he succeeded to the crown the kingdom was in a deplorable state from the devastations of Hazael and Ben-hadad, kings of Syria. Accordingly Joash did defeat Ben-hadad three times on the field of battle, and recovered from him the cities which Hazael had taken from Jehoahaz
Famine And Drought - The siege of cities also resulted in famine, such as the siege of Samaria by Ben-hadad (2 Kings 6:24-25 ) and the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:2-3 ). See Ben-hadad ; Jerusalem ; Nebuchadnezzar ; Samaria; Water
Sons of the Prophets - ... The single reference outside the Elisha cycle to the sons of the prophets is to someone identified as “a certain man of the sons of the prophets” who condemned Ahab's release of Ben-hadad (1 Kings 20:35-42 )
Damascus - ) the king of Judah invoked the aid of Ben-hadad, king of Syria, whose royal city was Damascus, against his Israelite enemy. By gifts he persuaded him to break the truce already existing between Ben-hadad and Israel, and to join partnership with Judah. Accordingly Ben-hadad proceeded to harass Baasha on his northern borders, and so induced him to desist from his plan of erecting border fortifications between the two Hebrew kingdoms. Hostilities continued between Syria and Israel till the days of Ahab: Ahab’s sparing of Ben-hadad after the battle of Aphek and his making a truce with him, were the cause of a prophetic denunciation ( 1 Kings 20:42 )
Ahab - About six years later, Ben-hadad, king of Syria, invaded Israel with a great army, but was ignominiously defeated; and still more disastrously the year after, when Ahab took him captive, but soon released him, and thus incurred the displeasure of God
Joram or Jehoram - Not long after he was involved in war with Ben-hadad king of Syria, and Hazael his successor; and in this time occurred the miraculous deliverance of Samaria from siege and famine, and also various miracles of Elisha, including the healing of Naaman
Syria - When Baasha of Israel built a fort at Ramah threatening Jerusalem, Asa of Judah enticed the king of Damascus, “Ben-hadad the son of Tabrimmon, the son of Hezion,” to break his league with Israel and come to Judah's aid (1 Kings 15:18-19 ). Ben-hadad responded by conquering a number of cities and territory in the north of Israel (1 Kings 15:20 ). The genealogy given in this passage has been confirmed by a stele, found near Aleppo, dedicated to the god Melqart by Ben-hadad
Hamath - King Irhuleni of Hamath joined a coalition including Ben-hadad II of Damascus and Ahab of Israel which successfully thwarted the advance of Shalmaneser II of Assyria into northern Syria
Naphtali - When Baasha, king of Israel, attacked Judah, Asa sent gold and silver to Ben-hadad, king of Syria, for help
Ahab - In two wars with Syria, this prince was successful, but he improperly spared Ben-hadad, the Syrian king
Hadad - It appears in Ben-hadad, son, i
Servant, Service - ... Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (1 Samuel 17:58 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Ahab - ... Ahab was successful in two major campaigns against the Syrian king, Ben-hadad, but was mortally wounded in the third
Damascus - Its history at this period is to be found in the accounts given of Naaman, Ben-hadad, Hazael, and Rezin
Elisha - "The bands of Syria came no more into the land of Israel;" that is, the marauding bands that laid plots to seize the king; for immediately we read that Ben-hadad king of Syria came with a great army and besieged Samaria. ... The prophet went to Damascus, and Ben-hadad, being sick, sent Hazael to inquire if he should recover
Dan - It was captured by Ben-hadad ( 1 Kings 15:20 )
Strength - This is also the emphasis in 1 Kings 15:20: “Ben-hadad … sent the captains of the hosts which he had [NASB, “commanders of his armies”] against the cities of Israel
Covenant - ... Ben-hadad, king of Damascus in Syria, promised to return captured cities to Israel and to provide Israel with markets for its products in Damascus if the king of Israel would make a peace treaty or political alliance with him (1 Kings 20:31-35 ). Earlier, Asa, king of Judah, had used the Temple treasury to pay tribute to Ben-hadad of Damascus to entice Ben-hadad to break his vassal treaty with Baasha, king of Israel, and enter into a similar treaty with Judah (1 Kings 15:19 ; 2 Chronicles 16:3 )
Angel - , we read that Ben-hadad sent messengers with the terms of surrender: “He sent messengers to Ahab king of Israel into the city, and said unto him, Thus saith Benhadad …” (1 Kings 20:2)
Dan - This city was soon taken by Ben-hadad of Aram and then recaptured by Jeroboam II in the eighth century B
Covenant - ... Ahab defeated the Syrians: “So he made a covenant with [Ben-hadad], and sent him away” (1 Kings 20:34)
Assyria, History And Religion of - , at Qarqar in north Syria, Shalmaneser fought a coalition of twelve kings including Hadad-ezer (Ben-hadad, 1Kings 20:26,1 Kings 20:34 ) of Aram-Damascus and Ahab of Israel. ) entered Damascus, taking extensive tribute from Ben-hadad III
Elisha - Ben-hadad, suffering from a severe ailment, hears of his presence in his capital, and sends Hazael to the man of God to inquire concerning the issue
Gather - In 1 Kings 20:1, qâbats carries this sense in addition to overtones of “concentrating” an entire army against a particular point: “And Ben-hadad the king of Syria gathered all his host together: and there were thirty and two kings with him, and horses, and chariots: and he went up and besieged Samaria, and warred against it
Commerce - The economic and political importance of these trading communities is seen in Solomon's construction of storehouse cities in Hamath (2 Chronicles 8:4 and in Ahab's negotiations with Ben-hadad of Syria for the establishment of “market areas in Damascus” ( 1 Kings 20:34 NIV)
Transportation And Travel - Ben-hadad, the king of Syria, sent “forty camel-loads” of goods to Elisha in an attempt to learn if he would recover from an illness
Galilee (2) - It was ravaged by Ben-hadad (1 Kings 15:20), probably won back by Ahab, taken again by the Aramaeans under Hazael (2 Kings 12:18; 2 Kings 13:22), and recovered by Jeroboam ii
Temple of Jerusalem - King Asa plundered his own Temple treasuries to buy a military ally, Ben-hadad of Syria against Baasha, king of North Israel (1 Kings 15:18-19 ), though he had previously repaired the Temple altar and carried out limited worship reforms (2 Chronicles 15:8-18 )