Character Study on Apelles

Character Study on Apelles

Romans 16: Salute Apelles approved in Christ. Salute them which are of Aristobulus' household.

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Easton's Bible Dictionary - Apelles
A Christian at Rome whom Paul salutes (Romans 16:10 ), and styles "approved in Christ."
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Apelles
Exclusion; separation
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Apelles
A Christian saluted in Romans 16:10 as "approved in Christ." A common Jewish name, probably not, as Origen thought, Apollos. Said to have been afterward bishop of Smyrna.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Apelles
APELLES . The name of a Christian who is greeted by St. Paul in Romans 16:10 , and who is described as the ‘approved in Christ.’ It was the name borne by a distinguished tragic actor, and by members of the household.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Apelles, Saint
Martyr. Bishop of Smyrna. Paul greeted him as "approved in Christ" (Romans 16).
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Apelles
(Ἀπελλῆς, a Greek name possibly contracted from Apollodorus, and apparently common among Jews of the Dispersion [1]).-Apelles, saluted by St. Paul in Romans 16:10, is called ‘the approved in Christ’ (τὸν δόκιμον ἐν Χριστῷ). The phrase may indicate that he had been specially tested and tried by affliction or persecution, or that he was a Christian who had gained the approbation of the Church, sufficiently perhaps to be called to the ministry (cf. 1 Timothy 3:10). Nothing is known of Apelles beyond this reference
Assuming the Roman destination of these salutations, he was probably a Jewish convert residing in Rome as a member of the Imperial household. As the salutation which follows is that to ‘the household of Aristobulus,’ it has been suggested that Apelles’ Christian activity may have lain in that direction. If Aristobulus (q.v. [2] ) was the grandson of Herod, Apelles would no doubt find in his ‘household’ many members of his own race. The name Apelles is known to have belonged to the Imperial household. It was borne by a famous tragic actor in the time of the Emperor Caius (see Lightfoot, Philippians4, 1878, p. 174).
T. B. Allworthy.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Apelles
(uh pehl' lehss) A Christian in Rome whom Paul saluted as “approved in Christ” (Romans 16:10 ), which may mean he had been tested by persecution and proved faithful.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Apelles
A Christian of Rome saluted by Paul as 'approved in Christ.' Rom. 16:10.

Sentence search

Apelles - , that, as modern Jews take a Gentile name which closely resembles their Hebrew name, so in ancient times a Jew called Abel might choose the name Apelles]'>[1]). -Apelles, saluted by St. Nothing is known of Apelles beyond this reference...
Assuming the Roman destination of these salutations, he was probably a Jewish convert residing in Rome as a member of the Imperial household. As the salutation which follows is that to ‘the household of Aristobulus,’ it has been suggested that Apelles’ Christian activity may have lain in that direction. ]'>[2] ) was the grandson of Herod, Apelles would no doubt find in his ‘household’ many members of his own race. The name Apelles is known to have belonged to the Imperial household
Apelles - Apelles
Apelleans - So called from Apelles, in the second century
Rhodo, a Christian Writer - In it he tells of the sects into which the Marcionites split up after Marcion's death, and gives an interesting account of an oral controversy held by him with the Marcionite Apelles, then an old man
Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi - " Other well-known paintings are "The Calumny of Apelles," "Pallas and the Centaur," "Saint Augustine," and "The Last Communion of Saint Jerome
Sandro Botticelli - " Other well-known paintings are "The Calumny of Apelles," "Pallas and the Centaur," "Saint Augustine," and "The Last Communion of Saint Jerome
Lucanus (1) - They may have been so called in contradistinction to the Marcionites of the school of Apelles, who approached more nearly to the orthodox
Eusebius Emesenus, Bishop of Emesa - Theodoret also speaks of works of his against Apelles ( Haer
Temptation, Trial - Apelles is ‘the approved in Christ’ (Romans 16:10)
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - 13) that after his death his followers broke up into sects, among the leaders of which he names Apelles, who only acknowledged one first principle; Potitus and Basilicus, who counted two; and Syneros, who counted three ( Ref. In all these systems the good Being was acknowledged to be superior to the others, so it was not a violent change to assume that from this principle the others were derived; and Apelles and his school drew near the orthodox and taught that there was but one self-originated principle. See DOCETISM for an account of Marcion's doctrine on this subject and that of his disciple Apelles who on this point as on others approached more nearly to the orthodox
Romans, the Epistle to the - A considerable number saluted in Romans 16 were Jew-Christians: Mary, Aquila, Priscilla, Andronicus and Junia, Paul's kinsmen, Herodion, Apelles, Aristobulus (of the Herodian family)
Docetism - Marcion's disciple Apelles so far modified his master's doctrine that he was willing to own that Jesus had a solid body, but denied that there had been a birth in which He had assumed it (Tert
the Unmerciful Servant - You would have been like Apelles the painter who never passed a day without drawing at least one line and filling it in
Jesus Christ - Marcion, Apelles, Valentinus, and many other heretics, denied Christ's humanity, as some have done since
Gospels (Uncanonical) - After quoting Luke’s preface, he applies its language to Gospels ‘like that according to the Egyptians, and according to Thomas, and according to Matthias, and according to Bartholomew, also the Gospel of the Twelve Apostles, and of Basilides, and of Apelles, as well as others which it would take a very long time to enumerate
Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
( d ) The Gospel of Apelles