Exhaustive information for Strongs Number: 1993

Word info for ἐπιστομίζω

Root: ἐπιστομίζω
Strongs Number: 1993
Transliteration: [epistomizo]
Phonetics: ep·ee·stom·id·zo
Etymology: From 1909 and 4750
Parts of Speech: v.
Twot:
Sense: to bridle or stop up the mouth (more info)

Outline of Biblical Usage:


   1 to bridle or stop up the mouth.
   2 metaph.
   to stop the mouth, reduce to silence.
   

Frequency in the Books

Words from the Root of G1993

ἐπιστομίζειν

All words for strongs number G1993 :

Word Occurance
ἐπιστομίζειν 1

How strongs number G1993 is translated (KJV)

English Occurance
to silence 1

Two strong number together

Greek Commentary Content Search

James 3:2 If not [ειου]
Condition of first class with ου — ou (not μη — mē) negativing the verb πταιει — ptaiei word In speech. The teacher uses his tongue constantly and so is in particular peril on this score.The same (ουτος — houtos). “This one” (not ο αυτος — ho autos the same).A perfect man “A perfect husband” also, for ανηρ — anēr is husband as well as man in distinction from woman The wife is at liberty to test her husband by this rule of the tongue.To bridle the whole body also (χαλιναγωγησαι και ολον το σωμα — chalinagōgēsai kai holon to sōma). See note on James 1:26 for this rare verb applied to the tongue (γλωσσαν — glōssan). Here the same metaphor is used and shown to apply to the whole body as horses are led by the mouth. The man follows his own mouth whether he controls the bridle therein (James 1:26) or someone else holds the reins. James apparently means that the man who bridles his tongue does not stumble in speech and is able also to control his whole body with all its passions. See Titus 1:11 about stopping people‘s mouths (επιστομιζω — epistomizō). [source]
James 3:2 A perfect man [τελειος ανηρ]
“A perfect husband” also, for ανηρ — anēr is husband as well as man in distinction from woman The wife is at liberty to test her husband by this rule of the tongue.To bridle the whole body also (χαλιναγωγησαι και ολον το σωμα — chalinagōgēsai kai holon to sōma). See note on James 1:26 for this rare verb applied to the tongue (γλωσσαν — glōssan). Here the same metaphor is used and shown to apply to the whole body as horses are led by the mouth. The man follows his own mouth whether he controls the bridle therein (James 1:26) or someone else holds the reins. James apparently means that the man who bridles his tongue does not stumble in speech and is able also to control his whole body with all its passions. See Titus 1:11 about stopping people‘s mouths (επιστομιζω — epistomizō). [source]
James 3:2 To bridle the whole body also [χαλιναγωγησαι και ολον το σωμα]
See note on James 1:26 for this rare verb applied to the tongue Here the same metaphor is used and shown to apply to the whole body as horses are led by the mouth. The man follows his own mouth whether he controls the bridle therein (James 1:26) or someone else holds the reins. James apparently means that the man who bridles his tongue does not stumble in speech and is able also to control his whole body with all its passions. See Titus 1:11 about stopping people‘s mouths (επιστομιζω — epistomizō). [source]

1 Verses with G1993

Titus 1:11
Literal: whom it is necessary to silence who whole households overthrow teaching things that [they] not ought base gain for [the] sake of
KJV: Whose  must  be stopped,  who  subvert  whole  houses,  teaching  things which  they ought  not,  filthy  lucre's  sake. 

Old Testament
Gen Exo Lev Num Deut
Josh Judg Rth 1 Sam 2 Sam
1 Kgs 2 Kgs 1 Chron 2 Chron Ezra
Neh Esth Job Psa Prov
Eccles Song Isa Jer Lam
Ezek Dan Hos Joel Amos
Obad Jnh Micah Nah Hab
Zeph Haggai Zech Mal
New Testament (1)
Matt Mrk Luk John Act
Rom 1 Cor 2 Cor Gal Ephes
Phil Col 1 Thess 2 Thess 1 Tim
2 Tim Titus (1) Philem Hebrews James
1 Pet 2 Pet 1 John 2 John 3 John
Jude Rev